HOPE For All, Inc.

Offering life's essential's today... to give HOPE for a self-sufficient tomorrow

aka He Opens Paths to Everyone Inc., HOPE For All   |   Glen Burnie, MD   |  www.hopeforall.us

Mission

HOPE For All is a Christian ministry whose mission is to provide basic human necessities (i.e. furniture, housewares, clothing and personal items) to families and individuals without sufficient economic resources. We are a public 501(C)(3) who serves residents in Anne Arundel County and parts of Baltimore City. We seek to bolster the dignity of disadvantaged families and adults by providing for their basic human needs. Great efforts are taken to promote responsibility, not dependency. We strive not to diminish the incentive of individuals and families to provide for themselves and find meaningful work.

Notes from the nonprofit

We are the only AACO nonprofit who purchases, provides, and delivers all basic goods (i.e. beds, furniture, housewares, clothing, linens, hygiene/cleaning items) at non-monetary cost to 300+ households (1,000+ adults/children) living in poverty through our unique annual Turning Houses into Homes Program. We work closely with 30+ government offices, nonprofits, and schools, who refer families (about 70% of clients) and adults transitioning from homelessness, shelters, displacement, recovery, crisis, and who are often living in substandard (mostly empty, dark) public housing. We serve all people in need and do not discriminate based on race, ethnicity, gender, age, creed, etc. Our annual programs give 50,000+ goods (reusable and new) to 2,000+ people in need; about 57% or more are children. As one of the largest AACO recyclers, we ensure donated reusable goods are redistributed to people in need instead of adding waste to our landfill. During COVID-19, we served 9,059 people.

Ruling year info

2006

Executive Director

Mrs. Constance Cooper

Main address

P.O. Box 1548

Glen Burnie, MD 21060 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

He Opens Paths to Everyone Inc.

EIN

20-1768641

NTEE code info

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There are an increasing number of individuals, especially children/students, living in poverty in our community who are without beds, household items, clothing, furniture and other critical necessities to establish healthy homes and lives. This gap in resources makes it difficult to attain the goal of being a self-sufficient member of society. Too many adults and children are sleeping and eating on floors and without utensils necessary to cook their own meals. Students are without sufficient clean clothing, basic shoes, etc., resulting in low self esteem and high absenteeism. HOPE For All serves all AACO people in need--single parents, families in crisis (i.e. displaced due to fires/floods, struggling to care for very sick children/family members), grandparents raising grandchildren, veterans, adults with physical/mental disabilities, adults in recovery, seniors, and additional people in need-- by giving basic clothing and/or basic goods to establish healthy homes and lives.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Turning Houses Into Homes

Uniquely serving 300+ households in need annually in Anne Arundel County (AACO) and bordering areas of Baltimore by purchasing, providing, and delivering beds, basic furniture, housewares, clothing, etc., at non-monetary cost to families/adults transitioning from homelessness, shelters, etc., into mostly public housing and/or living in poverty without these goods.

Over 30 agencies, nonprofits, and schools refer clients who need these essentials to establish healthy homes/lives. There is no other nonprofit serving AACO in this entirety.

Clients include: Families and adults who are homeless, in crisis, and living with poverty. This includes: single moms, parents, adults w/disabilities; grandparents raising grandchildren; veterans; senior; adults in recovery; adult students, etc.

We serve all people in need. Areas served include Glen Burnie, Annapolis, Severn, Pasadena, Linthicum, Jessup, Ft. Meade, Brooklyn, Brooklyn Park, Curtis Bay and all AACO.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Health
Age groups
Family relationships
Economically disadvantaged people

For some families, outfitting their children for school is beyond their financial reach. Through our Head to Toe program, we give Anne Arundel County Public School children well-fitting shoes and essential clothing. If a child is missing clothes for any number of reasons, we fill the need and get it to them as fast as possible. HOPE works directly with school counselors, pupil personnel workers (PPWs), social workers, and staff who refer students and their families.

HOPE For All was founded by educators who saw firsthand that students lacking in basic needs do not have an equal opportunity for success. New undergarments, basic athletic shoes, clothing for all seasons, and warm winter coats allow children to attend school, ready to learn. An integral part of our mission is our call to serve children.

We also give additional basic clothing to people in need within our community. We work with churches, the AACO public school system, and the Judy Center to host these events.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Emergency clothing is given to individuals in crisis, people living in homelessness or coming off the street with addiction, children placed in emergency housing, or individuals moving into shelters. Referring AACO partners ask us to provide clothing to these individuals. These agencies and nonprofits include: Mental Health Agency/Crisis Response, Department of Health, Department of Social Services, nonprofits, prison ministries, recovery houses, etc. Reusable quality clothing and new undergarments are given.

This program serves all Anne Arundel County (AACO) and areas bordering Baltimore City (Curtis Bay, Brooklyn).

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

Our Turning Houses into Homes Program gives Baskets of HOPE to client households. This includes a laundry basket with detergents, soaps, personal/hygiene essentials, shampoos/conditioners, cleaning supplies, nightlights, paper products, etc. This nurtures self-dignity and ensures adults and children/students can take care of themselves and clean their homes to establish healthy living environments.

Coronavirus Relief Fund Program
With COVID-19 health concerns and many AACO families/adults needing hygiene/cleaning items, this program was established thru CARES funding. Since July 2020, we purchased/gave 2,500 commodity boxes (cleaning supplies/paper products) and 3,800 kits (hygiene items/masks) to food pantries and prison ministries. For students attending school on-line, we purchased and delivered 50 student desks. We purchased 1,544 coats and 504 sweatshirts/pants, which were distributed by us and food pantries to give to people in need. This program has been extended.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Incarcerated people
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Health

Where we work

Awards

Co-Winner Nonprofit of the Year 2016

Anne Arundel Housing Coalition

Executive Citation by County Executive 2017

AACO Chamber of Commerce

Certificate of Recognition 2016

A.A. County Board of Education

Partner of the Year 2016

Anne Arundel Community College

Service above Self: Operations Manager & Board Member 2018

Rotary Service Award

Excellence in Education Award: Business Partner 2017

AACO Board of Education

Outstanding Nonprofit of the Year 2020

Community Foundation of Anne Arundel County (CFAAC)

15th Anniversary Deleg. Citation 2019

AACO

Winner of Best Charity Nonprofit 2021

Capital Gazette

Affiliations & memberships

Member of Maryland Nonprofits (ongoing member) 2021

Number of low-income families housed in affordable, well-maintained units as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Families

Related Program

Turning Houses Into Homes

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

# of households referred by 26+ community partners. We purchase, prepare, and deliver beds/furniture, housewares, clothing, linens, & all basic goods at non-monetary cost to set up healthy homes.

Number of beds given and delivered to adults and children/students in need

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Families

Related Program

Turning Houses Into Homes

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We purchase, give & deliver beds--twin, full, bunk, crib, etc.--to households. This is our most expensive inventory purchase; we ongoingly negotiate with several vendors to stretch funding.

Average number of dollars per person served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Families

Related Program

Turning Houses Into Homes

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total value of goods divided by the number of clients (adults and children/students) served each year through this program.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Seniors

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In the second half of our FY20 year (beginning in February/March 2020 due to COVID-19 health precautions) there was a reduction in the number of volunteers serving for several months.

Total Cost for Basic Goods Purchased (Not available in Donated Inventory or Needing to be New)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Families, Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Beds, basic furniture (i.e. dressers, sofas, kitchen tables/chairs), clothing (i.e. undergarments, basic athletic shoes), household items/linens, cleaning/hygiene items.

#People who have transitioned/established healthy homes after homelessness, shelters, displacement, etc.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Families

Related Program

Turning Houses Into Homes

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Clients: About 70% are families, over 50% are children/students. Additional Clients: seniors, veterans, grandparent raising grandchildren, adults w/disabilities, adults in recovery, etc.

#Students & family members given basic clothing thru Head to Toe (HTT) Referrals sent by AACO School Staff

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth, Families

Related Program

Head to Toe

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

AACO Pupil Personnel Workers (PPWs), social workers/counselors, and staff refer students/family members who need this clothing. We help all AACO schools. Program was piloted/ established 2015-2016.

#Adults & children/students given basic emergency clothing by Next Step

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Children and youth

Related Program

Next Step Clothing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2019, this program was established. We receive referrals from nonprofits, Government offices, Crisis Response, etc., asking us to give basic clothing to adults and families in crisis.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

HOPE For All's primary goal is to provide all basic goods to families/adults and households in need during the year, who are living in poverty and unable to afford these essentials. We are passionate about ensuring each adult and child has what they need to live in healthy/furnished homes and nurture healthy lives. We serve all people in need regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, age, creed, etc. We work not to compete with but to support and work with all community partners to serve our communities. Our goals are to build healthy families so more people can be self sufficient in households of their own, nurture better standards of living by one-on-one caring and making it possible for more students to become successful through reduced absenteeism and improved self esteem. Together they will be able to move forward into a new job and/or attend school in order to build a stronger future and community.

We sort and inventory reusable and purchased basic goods in our warehouse for distribution. These include:

• Furniture: Complete beds (i.e. mattresses, box springs, frames, bunks, cribs), kitchen tables/chairs, sofas, love seats, upholstered chairs, dressers, night stands/tables, lamps, etc.
• Clothing: Shoes, pants, shirts, spring/winter jackets/coats, undergarments (i.e. socks, t-shirts, underwear), basic athletic shoes, every day items, etc.
• Household: Pots/pans, dishes, flatwear, kitchen utensils, small appliances (i.e. coffee pots, microwaves), bedding, linens, nightlights, etc.
• Students: Desks and tables so students have a place to do homework.
• Hygiene/Toiletry items, Cleaning Supplies, Paper Products, etc.

During the year, we continue to balance the number of basic goods needed by our clients with our available donated inventory. Our staff/volunteers receive, sort, evaluate, and process thousands of client goods ensuring they are of decent quality that we would accept for ourselves. Self-dignity through the gift-of-goods is essential. We believe this nurtures many families/adults to believe in themselves, feel safe/secure, and have hope for their futures.

In redistributing many reusable goods to families/adults in need, we help to reduce the waste being added to our county landfill.

However, with the ongoing high need, we must still purchase basic goods not available in this inventory and/or needing to be new. This includes beds, basic furniture, household items, linens, clothing, etc. Beds and furniture represent about 85% of our purchasing budget and 15% is for clothing, household items, and linens, which are cost $100,000 or more to purchase during the year. During COVID-19, our programs continued to provide clothing and/or basic goods to people in need.

During the year, we work with 30+ community partners (Government agencies, nonprofits/shelters, county schools) who refer families/adults and/or households in need.

HOPE For All develops strategic partnerships with government agencies, community partners, nonprofits, churches, and all Anne Arundel County Public Schools in order to identify clients in need, draw support, increase volunteerism and minimize redundancies in services. A continual focus is raising funds and recruiting volunteers to carry out the program effectively.

Our Turning Houses into Homes Program uniquely provides and delivers basic goods--beds, basic furniture, household items, clothing and other necessities--at no cost to family and/or individual households in need. Community partners are core, as they meet with and qualify clients and refer households in need who are unable to afford basic goods as they are earning incomes well below the federal poverty line and/or living wage requirements. This especially helps areas of extreme poverty which includes many families/adults transitioning into or living in AACO public housing and Brooklyn, Brooklyn Park, and Curtis Bay where many households are on the border of AACO and Baltimore City. The major areas of high (critical) need are: Glen Burnie, Annapolis, Pasadena, Severn/Hanover, plus other geographic AACO areas of need.

Through our Head to Toe Program, referrals are received from Anne Arundel County school counselors, pupil personnel workers (PPWs), social workers, and staff, who identify students and their families who are needing clothing, basic athletic shoes, and school supplies. We serve all AACO schools.

Our Next Step Clothing Program receives emergency clothing referrals from Mental Health Agency/Crisis Response, Department of Health, Department of Social Services, nonprofits, prison ministries, recovery houses, etc. These caseworkers identify adults and families in crisis who are needing essential clothing and undergarments. It is not uncommon for these individuals to be referred to our Turning Houses into Homes Program as they transition from crisis to housing.

During the year, we also give basic hygiene/cleaning items to families and adults through our programs, so they can establish healthy lives and homes.

HOPE For All has a strong diverse board that consists of both business, education, and community leaders that are involved in strategic planning, advocacy, and hands-on mission activities. We have a knowledgeable and dedicated staff who has been serving for many years. We have strong community supporters that donate time, money, and needed items. We have progressed from working out of a basement to a highly efficient and organized operation in a 14,000 square foot rented warehouse where community donations are received, processed, and stored.

RESOURCES

Our resources include a 16' box truck, a van, and a trailer for pickups and deliveries, 9 staff (F-T/P-T), 120+ volunteers (serving about 12,000+ hours annually), an active Board of Directors, and a 14,000 square-foot warehouse. Through these resources, we process community donated goods (i.e. clothing, household items, furniture, linens, toys, infant items), pick up large donations (i.e. furniture), purchase additional basic goods (i.e. beds, furniture, clothing, basic athletic shoes, linens, toiletries, household supplies), and provide donated goods--we do not need--to other nonprofits.

Our community partners are essential. We nurture and keep in frequent contact with our referring partners who include government offices, nonprofits, schools, churches, etc. These community partners identify families, individuals, and students in need. Our partners include but are not limited to:

All AACO Public Schools: includes Birth to Five, Ferndale Early Ed. Ctr.

Government Agencies/Offices:
• Dept. of Social Services (AACO, Maryland State)
• AACO Crisis Response
• AACO Partnership of Children, Youth & Families
• AACO Healthy Start
• AACO Dept. of Aging & Disabilities
• AACO Dept. of Health
• AACO Mental Health Agency
• AACO Police Department
• Veteran's Affairs
• Housing Commissions: AACO (HCAAC) & Annapolis (HACA)

Nonprofits:
• AACO Medical Center
• Arundel House of Hope
• Arundel Lodge
• Benevolent Baskets
• Blessed Tech Ministries
• City of Annapolis Housing Authority
• Community Residences
• Damascus House
• Gabriel Network
• The Well
• Judy Centers (Bell Grove, Georgetown East)
• Light House Shelter
• Maryland Reentry Resource Center
• Mary's Center
• MCVET
• People Encouraging People
• Professional Development Group Rehabilitation Services
• Sarah’s House
• Service Coordination
• Thrive Behavioral Services
• We Care and Friends
• Churches of various denominations.

During the year, we redistribute thousands of reusable donated goods back into the community to help clients in need. We also pass on donated (used) goods--we do not need for our clients--to other nonprofits to help their clients in need.

We continue to develop strategic partnerships with retailers/businesses by negotiating discounted purchase costs for beds, furniture, and basic goods.

In 2004, our nonprofit began serving 13 families in need by providing clothing and household goods while working out of our founder's home. Since 2004, we have given basic goods and clothing to over 27,000 people in need, due to the growing number of people needing these essentials each year.

In FY21 (July 2020 - June 2021) and with COVID-19, our programs gave basic goods to adults and children/students in need as follows:

Turning Houses into Homes: Purchased, prepared, and delivered 392 beds, basic furniture, clothing, household items, etc., to 392 households (849 adults/children) at non-monetary cost to them.

Head to Toe Program (piloted/established in 2015-2016): Gave basic clothing to 117 students/family members. This was a decrease from previous years due to COVID-19.

Next Step Clothing Program: Gave emergency clothing to 345 adults/children in crisis.

Coronavirus Relief Program (New): Gave cleaning supplies/paper products, hygiene essentials/masks, student desks, and clothing to 7,748 people in need.

From March 2020 and during COVID-19, HOPE For All continued to serve households in need so adults/children did not have to live in mostly empty, poorly lit housing after homelessness or crisis. From March-June 2020, we provided and delivered beds, furniture, clothing, household items, linens, and basic goods to 117 households benefiting 333 adults and children/students through our Turning Houses into Homes Program. In total, during FY20 (July 2019-June 2020), we served 382 households (1,100 adults/children). We kept ordering beds, had beds shipped or we picked up beds locally, operated with less staff/volunteers who were also quarantining and processing client goods in our warehouse, picked up donated furniture from households (garages/driveways) for clients, etc. It was not easy: our staff diligently worked inside/outside of our warehouse.

We have grown from an all volunteer non-funded organization with a vision to serve as a unique thriving resource for the community. In 2016, we had 3 staff and now have triple the staff (F-T and P-T) to help provide basic goods to the increasing number of families/adults needing goods each year. In 2019, our Executive Director (Leo Zerhusen, founder and volunteer for many years) stepped down and we hired a full-time Executive Director. (Leo still enjoys assisting in the office/warehouse.)

It is an ongoing balance of resources and funding to serve more households/people needing basic goods each year. We are working on increasing our capacity to serve. We need to add additional racking, plastic bins and shall be updating our manual inventory system to bar coding, to meet the costs of growth.

Based on our 2020 990 (FY21 year), our expenses represent 83% program, 8% administrative, and 9% fundraising. About 40% of our income/expenses are gifts-in-kind goods.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    All families, students, and adults in need within AACO and in areas bordering AACO/Baltimore City (Curtis Bay, Brooklyn). Through our programs, we ensure people living in poverty, who are referred to us by our community partners, are able to be given basic clothing and/or basic goods to establish healthy lives and homes. The clients we serve come from dire crisis. Not only are they living with poverty, many are homeless and in transition. In providing the gift of goods through our programs, we directly support these families/adults to move forward, nurture self-dignity, bring improved physical and mental health, and build self-confidence. With this unique form of health care and economic assistance, they become empowered to move towards self-sufficiency.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Client Stories,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To identify client obstacles & successes.,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We recently updated our post follow-up survey questions. In interviewing past clients, we are able to reconnect with them and also use this information for outcomes. We reviewed this form and our in-take forms with a professional who is very familiar with data collection and measuring outcomes. We are also using Salesforce, QuickBooks, and Microsoft Office applications to enter and track client data, goods given/values, demographics, geographics, specific program data, etc. Our goal is to have access to more data, to create various reports for comparisons and to identify growth, and update our funders.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners, Newsletters, Social Media,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

HOPE For All, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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HOPE For All, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 11/17/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Charles Wagner, Jr.

Arundel Federal Savings Bank

Term: 2019 -


Board co-chair

Ms. Cathleen Doyle

Anne Arundel Community College

Term: 2020 -

Lisa Knell

Technical Support Technician II, AACPS

Terry Gilleland

MD State Director of Adult Education

Sandra Hartzell

Engineer, RK&K

Donna Robinson

Retired Paraeducator AACPS, Community Outreach Volunteer

Michael Gallina

Exec. VP/CFO/Treasurer, Carroll CommunityBank

Leo Zerhusen

Founder/Ambassador, Advisor only (Non-voting)

Constance Cooper

Advisor only (Non-Voting)

Linda Swenson

Retired Educator/Supervisor, Towson University, World Languages

Matthew Evans

CEO, MWE Partnership

Kevin Loftis

Chief Information Officer, Johns Hopkins University Press

Cathleen Doyle

Director, Sarbanes Center, Anne Arundel Community College

Charles Wagner

VP/Manager of Residential Lending, Arundel Federal Savings Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/9/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/20/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.