Health—General & Rehabilitative

Project Camp, Inc.

Inspire Empower Enhance

aka The Center for Courageous Kids   |   Scottsville, KY   |  www.courageouskids.org

Mission

Instilling inspiration and empowerment while enhancing the lives of children with serious illnesses.

Ruling year info

2005

President/CEO and Executive Director

Joanie O'Bryan

Main address

1501 Burnley Rd

Scottsville, KY 42164 USA

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EIN

20-1789905

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Patient Services - Entertainment, Recreation (E86)

Recreational and Sporting Camps (Day, Overnight, etc.) (N20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There is a current need for children living with a chronic illness or disability, to have the opportunity to experience “normalcy" through interaction with peers who share the same health conditions. These children are often challenged by a culture of dependency and isolation which negatively impacts achievement of growth and developmental milestones. The camp experience helps marginalize the impact of these influences and improve a child's ability to withstand future life challenges. The quality of life for these children depends not only on their medical treatment but also on the successful management of the child's psychological care. Each child not only has the opportunity to enjoy a typical outdoor lifestyle, in an inclusive environment, but experience daily contact with other children who share similar life challenges.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Summer Camp

The Center for Courageous Kids (CCK) provides a camp experience for seriously ill children who typically would not be able to attend other camps due to their illness or because of liability issues. The ages of children served for summer camp are 7 to 16. CCK serves many illness groups including, asthma, cancer, cerebral palsy, diabetes, heart disease, blood disorders, muscular dystrophy, osteogenesis imperfecta, sickle cell, spina bifida, spinal muscular atrophy, and transplants.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Budget
$174,592

The Center for Courageous Kids (CCK) Family Retreats provide respite, recreation and support programs for seriously ill children and their families. For the parents, siblings and caregivers of our campers, the Family Retreats provides the opportunity to see their child or sibling enjoying activities and camaraderie they would otherwise not have access to, while also finding networks of support. Family Retreats serve children ages 5 - 17.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Budget
$40,920

Where we work

Accreditations

American Camping Association (ACA) - Accreditation 2015

American Camping Association (ACA) - Accreditation 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of total participants who quality of life was improved as a result of their camp experience?

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who received life learning experiences and improved self-esteem as a result of their camp experience?

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Our goal is that children with medical needs who participate in our camp experience will leave with renewed self-esteem and the knowledge to become more productive citizens. Specific goals include: A. Children learn to self-regulate their health condition and participate in management of medications, care procedures (i.e. catheterization, feeding tubes, central catheter), use of adaptive equipment (i.e. wheelchairs, walkers, braces, splints) and activities of daily living (bodily transfers, bathing, toileting). B. Children are educated about their health condition through participation in the camp experience and are able to articulate the challenges of their condition. These children will participate in experiential education which means they will take time after each activity and/or experience to discuss what they learned and how it can be used to make an impact in their lives after camp. C. Children demonstrate an increase in self-esteem by engaging with peers with similar health challenges, communicating effectively with peers and adults, and participating in self-care measures that were previously performed by family members and/or care providers. D. Children with chronic disease, disability, and life-threatening illnesses achieve a higher quality of life as evidenced by their ability to transfer knowledge and skills (i.e. care procedures, use of adaptive equipment, performing activities of daily living) from the camp experience to the home environment that can be applied throughout the year in maintaining their health status. CCK is also focused on providing the children we serve with additional education and skill sets they can use in their daily lives after returning home from camp. In an effort to accomplish this we developed Self-Care/Self-Advocacy Workshops and Track Programs for our summer camps. The Self-Care/Self-Advocacy Workshops provide additional education for the children tailored to their specific illness or condition as well as stresses the importance of self-advocating so they can communicate their needs to others. Each Workshop is designed where the information is presented in a fun and non-intrusive manner. Our Track Programs allow the camper to spend an allotted amount of time each day of camp in their chosen area (archery, cooking, equestrian, nature, art or music, cinematography) to learn additional skill sets. Each day they will learn a new skill and at the conclusion of the week of camp they will receive recognition for the completion of their designated Track Program. The various Track Programs will provide alternative interests for these children upon returning home from camp. As a result of their participation, they will gain confidence, independence and the ability to pursue the activity as a hobby or even future career path if they so choose.

While we ensure that our campers are having fun swimming, fishing, and riding horses, we are also dedicated to creating an environment that fosters opportunities for making excellent choices, creating and sustaining healthy relationships with peers, building personal confidence to work through challenges and achieve personal goals. We believe that children learn best when they have a unique mix of fun and life experiences. These are the kind of “life learning experiences" that you can expect the child to reach at camp: • Decision Making: Choosing between many options over the course of their stay • Team Work: Being a teammate and working with others towards common goals • Expanding Horizons: New activities and interacting with people of different backgrounds • Creative Expression: Opportunities to perform in front of groups • Individualism: Opportunities to express their opinions • Serving: Learning to share resources with fellow campers and compromising • Confidence and Self-Esteem: Practicing “supervised" independence • Leadership Skills: Opportunities to lead within their lodges • Experiencing Success: Competing in a healthy environment Camp Programs include: archery, equestrian program, pool, gym, rock climbing wall, woodshop, music therapy, nature and conservation, art therapy, crafts, theater, kid's kitchen, bowling alley, fishing, and boating.

The Center for Courageous Kids is a year-round medical camp that makes the medically infeasible, feasible and financially impossible, possible. While most other medical camp programs are forced to use rental facilities, The Center for Courageous Kids has the ability to manage and structure everything with the seriously ill child in mind. CCK is a turn-key facility providing full-time, medical camping professionals who organize intentional programming for multiple illness groups throughout the entire year.<br/><br/>Our medical and program staffs are highly trained pediatric professionals with expertise in medicine and therapeutic programs for our “courageous kids" and are able to conduct continuing care (i.e. chemo, dialysis, transfusions, etc.) on site. We have an onsite medical center and full time medical team, who make it possible to care for the populations that we serve. Our Medical Center is equipped with a pediatric exam room, trauma room, pharmacy, infusion suite, therapy room, and patient rooms. At our facility we are capable of caring for children requiring therapies such as medications, physical therapy, respiratory support, dialysis, infusion therapy for hemophiliacs, and chemotherapy.

Our Camp Programs are deemed successful if campers served demonstrate an increased knowledge of physical care needs, develop a network of peers to provide support and encouragement, or participate in personal and preventative care measures, (i.e. healthy nutrition, physical activity, invasive care measures, and skin assessment) that they can manage independently. Parental feedback regarding the long-term effects is helpful in identifying the true impact of care and services provided at CCK (i.e. child is able to spend the night with their best friend and do their own procedures). Our hope is to improve the overall quality of life for every child who attends CCK. <br/><br/>The Center for Courageous Kids has a variety of methods to evaluate our outcomes after each camp. To evaluate our program, we will look at what time and money has been invested, what services are being provided, and who is being reached. Through the review of annual reports, program documents, medical logs, the program budget and cash flow we can evaluate these areas. We consistently request feedback from families, volunteers, summer staff, campers, and year-round staff. <br/><br/>The next phase of the evaluation analyzes how camper attendance has changed. The Center for Courageous Kids will review camper statistics reports to monitor how many new children with disabilities are being reached over the course of each camp season and to determine where the majority of the camper population resides. <br/><br/>The Center for Courageous Kids will also analyze changes in camper's social skills and levels of independence. We will review medical logs, program documents, counselor evaluations and input from both campers and parents. In addition to changes in the seriously ill child, our plan is to also monitor the number of parents and siblings taking part in networks of support as a result of their camp experience.

Since opening in 2008, The Center for Courageous Kids (CCK) has served over 35,990 campers with 109 different diagnoses from 45 states and 13 countries, free of charge. CCK has been able to increase the programs and activities being offered to these seriously ill children and their families. The Center for Courageous Kids has increased its partnerships with hospitals, clinics, and illness specific organizations to increase camper referrals and medical volunteers. Efforts are on-going to increase awareness of our Camp on a national level. We are continuously building relationships with foundations, corporations, individuals, civic groups and health partners to increase revenues and not become dependent on any one source for funding. In addition, we are establishing new special events, improving upon existing events, and have created an annual giving program.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), paper surveys, focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person).

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: our staff, our board.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: we don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback.

Financials

Project Camp, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Project Camp, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 7/13/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Shawn Perry

The JPR Group of Baird Private Wealth Management

Term: 2020 - 2021

Brian Clemmons

South Central Bank

Joanie O'Bryan

The Center for Courageous Kids

Shawn Perry

The JPR Group of Baird Private Wealth Management

Audria Denker

Galen College of Nursing

Mike Sherrod

Tristar Greenview Hospital

Elizabeth McKinney

English Lucas Priest & Owsley, LLP

Dr. Richard Goldstein

Yale New Haven Health System

Jordan Clarke

Charles M. Moore Insurance Agency, Inc.

Dr. Mark McDonald

Norton Children's Hospital

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/13/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Keywords

child, illness, camp, youth, medical