The HALO Foundation

Love Heals

aka The HALO Foundation: Helping Art Liberate Orphans   |   Kansas City, MO   |  www.haloworldwide.org

Mission

HALO believes every child should have the support of a family. We provide housing, healing and education to thousands of homeless and at-risk children. HALO began in Kansas City, MO by HALO Founder Rebecca Welsh, and has served as the foundation of a family for children who need it most since 2005. Our mission is to help one more child spend one less day alone.

Ruling year info

2005

Founder and CEO

Rebecca Welsh

COO

Nicole Gerken

Main address

1600 Genessee St., Ste 200

Kansas City, MO 64102 USA

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EIN

20-1794209

NTEE code info

Youth Centers, Clubs, (includes Boys/Girls Clubs)- Multipurpose (O20)

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our mission is to help one more child spend one less day alone. We believe every child should have the support of a family. HALO provides housing, healing and education to homeless and at-risk children.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

HALO Kansas City Learning Center

HALO serves about 700 children in Kansas City, Mo. at its HALO Learning Center. Youth participate in therapeutic art and life skill programs, remote learning support, tutoring, professional development, scholarships and individual services in the areas of housing and mental health referrals. Free programs and services are offered year-round in partnership with numerous Kansas City organizations and shelters, multiple times a week, with a future focused curriculum to equip our youth with life skills to promote healing and help them learn independently in a safe environment. For the cost of $200 per youth, HALO can continue to provide and improve upon our program supplies, safe facilities and qualified staffing and additional resources.

HALO delivers free programming and services in partnership with numerous agencies and organizations in the Kansas City metro, including reStart Inc., Fairfax Learning Center, Cornerstones of Care, Newhouse, Salvation Army Children’s Shelter and Kansas City Public Schools.

The target population served in the HALO Learning Center are homeless and at-risk youth, as young as 5 years of age, into their early twenties, without a determined cut-off age of services. HALO Learning Center demographics are as follows:
50% Female
50% Male
50% Black/African American
30% White
20% Not Specified
Additionally, we have a growing population of teens who are unsheltered, oftentimes couch surfing across the Greater Kansas City metro. Counties include: Jackson County, Wyandotte County, and Clay County

In 2020, HALO served 754 youth over 182 programs. On average, HALO meets and serves 20-25 new youth per month, and 50 youth total per month. Due to the highly transitional nature of some of the youth’s situations and shelter timelines, HALO strives to make the largest impact in the shortest amount of time, and puts a strong focus on youth retention.

Since opening in 2010, the HALO Learning Center in KC has served over 5,000 homeless and at-risk youth. More than 6,000 young people in Greater Kansas City are homeless at any given time. (https://www.kctv5.com/news/homelessness-is-new-reality-for-thousands-of-kansas-city-area/article_28379daf-0a05-5c0d-9fe3-7ae4fae2555f.html)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adolescents

The HALO Girls Home is a Transitional Living Program (TLP). This is an 18 month-long program that provides free housing for pregnant, parenting, and non-parenting youth ages 16-21 years old who are in homeless or high-risk situations. The goal of the HALO Girls Home is to help youth exit “crisis mode,” set long-term goals for themselves, and learn to live independently. 

This program provides children of parenting teens a safe and stable living environment and assistance in securing daycare. Youth who are accepted into the program are required to be enrolled in school and seek and obtain part-time employment while they are in school. Youth who have graduated from high school must either obtain full-time employment or start college classes.

Youth are required to participate in life-skills workshops, which are aimed at teaching them how to live independently. Parenting youth are required to take weekly parenting classes. HALO staff work with youth on 5 main focus areas: Daily Living, Self Care, Relationships and Communication, Housing and Money Management, and Career and Education. Each youth meets weekly with HALO Staff to work on their goals and assess their progress throughout the program.

2020 Highlights:
37 Girls and Their Dependents Served
262 Recreational Activities Offered
117 Weekly Goals Meetings Facilitated
145 Goals Set by Residents Reached
66 Daily Life Skill Program Days
30 Girls Employed
31 High School Graduates will 11 choosing to enroll in University or Trade Schools

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children and youth

HALO supports youth homes and programs in Uganda, Kenya, Mexico and India. This includes providing food, water, shelter, clothing, education, therapeutic art, caretakers, and vocational training or college for youth in the greatest need.

India Program Description:
HALO supports 45 children at the Ashirvad Orphanage in Tuni, India. Many of the children residing at Ashirvad have not been able to stay with family due to severe poverty, illness, and/or the death of a parent or guardian. Many of the youth at this home lost family members from the 2004 tsunami that ravaged the nearby coast. HALO has been providing food, water, clothing, shelter, caretakers, therapeutic art and education to these children since 2006. In addition to providing basic needs, HALO has granted several scholarships to eligible youth from Ashirvad to attend vocation training or University over the years. Several youth have graduated and have entered the community as a contributing member, now able to provide care for themselves and their families. in 2020, HALO provided seven scholarships to the youth of Ashirvad.

Kenya Program Description:
HALO began working in Kenya in 2007 and currently supports two homes in the Nanyuki area. The Timau Home is located in the mountains of Kenya and houses 28-30 boys. The boys have become brothers while living in the home and consider HALO their family. The nearby Baraka Home houses 28-32 youth who have also become like brothers and sisters. Prior to HALO, thirteen youth from the Baraka Home were sleeping on the floor of mud huts until HALO was able to provide full support of the home. Many of the youth living in these homes have lost parents to the AIDS epidemic, and have been effected by extreme poverty.

HALO meets the basic needs of youth in the Timau and Baraka Homes including food, water, clothing, shelter, caretakers, education and art programming. In addition to meeting the basic needs of these youth HALO provides vocational or University scholarships to eligible youth. Vocational training or University provides youth in the HALO Kenya homes the tools they need to become contributing members of their communities.

Mexico Program Description:
Lily of the Valley was the first HALO-supported orphanage, and has had a relationship with this home since 2004. HALO provides the children of this home with tuition for education, school uniforms, art therapy and other needs. This orphanage houses anywhere from 65 to 110 children from the streets of Tijuana each year, with a focus on youth who have been victims of sexual abuse. Once youth are eligible, HALO provides scholarships to the youth of Lily of the Valley to attend vocational training or University.

Additional Research Sites Description:
HALO continually conducts research on current HALO sites and potential future sites for programming. We conduct research in areas based on need and in conjunction with partner or potential partner organizations. In the past, HALO has worked in and conducted extensive research in Central America, specifically Nicaragua and Guatemala. HALO also conducts extensive research in East Africa and plans to develop programming in these areas when growth opportunities arise. In 2018, HALO served 60 children in Mexico, 45 children in India, 43 children in Kenya and 353 children in Uganda.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children and youth

As a part of HALO's overarching goal of holistic development, The HALO Learning Center Uganda provides a collaborative space for HALO Ugandan youth to gather, learn, teach, grow and flourish. As Uganda continues to develop and advance as a country, HALO youth are increasingly experiencing issues similar to those of American inner city youth. Through our domestic Learning Center programming in the US, we have seen the difference that after school programming can make for a child and expanded this opportunity Internationally. The Learning Center Uganda serves as a space for youth to explore their passions and become engaged in safe and fun activities beyond the traditional classroom. Classes and workshops offered include health, professional development, computer training, art, dance, culinary arts, sewing and cosmetology. The Learning Center Uganda also provides opportunities for individualized tutoring, counseling and the opportunity for youth to enroll in an on-site cosmetology certification program. The HALO Learning Center Uganda has become an essential component to our programming and a place where HALO Uganda youth can thrive. In 2020, HALO served 1,384 youth at the Center.

Learn more at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMnKbvq9JnE

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children and youth

The HALO Jefferson City Boys program is a safe place of healing and hope and puts at-risk and homeless teen boys on a path to a positive future. Through tutoring, connecting with male role models, life skill development, healthy relationship building, and recreational activities, these boys have the potential to do great things in our community.

This program takes place in a home surrounded by 6 acres of land and connects male teens to resources year-round, provides a home cooked meal and is open during the after-school hours of Monday-Thursday 3 p.m. – 9 p.m. and hosts Summer activities.

To date, this program has served over 20 youth in need.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Men and boys

Where we work

Awards

Innovator 2017

ArtsKC Fund

Local Hero 2018

Ingram's

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Men and boys, Adolescents

Related Program

HALO Kansas City Learning Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

HALO empowers youth to become contributing members of their communities. Our goal is to break the cycle of youth homelessness and poverty.

HALO has a comprehensive strategic plan that all team members report on monthly via our HALO Scorecard.

Strategies are centered around Housing, Healing, Education initiatives. Please reference the Breaking the Cycle chart attached.

The key to HALO's success is not duplicating efforts and partnering with existing organizations that best fit our mission.
What HALO does well is taking programs and adapting them to any situation. Whether it is for a youth emergency shelter, an international home or a classroom, HALO's programming breaks down the barriers to allow the youth to dream about their future.

Over 82% of HALO hours are volunteer. HALO empowers over 200 volunteers worldwide to accomplish our mission.

HALO has served over 8,000 youth by providing housing, healing, education services.

Financials

The HALO Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The HALO Foundation

Board of directors
as of 5/24/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Eddie Welsh

COO at Capital Materials

Term: 2015 -

Vanessa Connell

CPA and Community Activist

Suzanne Alewine

CEO & Principal Parnter at Community Asset Builders

Greg Lam

Copilevitz & Canter

Bryan Albers

Community Activist

Kelli Jones

Senior Advisor, CPA and Certified Financial Planner at Moneta Group LLC.

Leandra Hulett

Group Vice President at Target

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/24/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/24/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.