NEW DIRECTIONS OF HORRY COUNTY

Hope Starts Here

Myrtle Beach, SC   |  http://www.helpnewdirections.org

Mission

New Directions’ mission is to help people recover from the crises of homelessness, poverty, and addiction by providing basic needs, connections to resources, and community support.

Ruling year info

2006

Chief Executive Officer

Kathy Jenkins

Main address

PO Box 2922

Myrtle Beach, SC 29578 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-1831970

NTEE code info

(Human Service Organizations) (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We work to address the issues of homelessness, poverty, and addiction. In recent years, these issues have increasingly entered the forefront of national conversation. On any given day, over half a million Americans are homeless. Locally, in Horry County, SC, there are 796 homeless individuals. 600 of those are unsheltered. In 2019, more than 70,000 persons in the US died from overdoses - 168 of those individuals lived in Horry and Georgetown counties and in 2020, overdoses increased by an estimated 30-40%. More than 12% of Horry County residents live below the poverty line, putting more than 42,000 at risk of devastating financial crises like homelessness. We address these issues by providing shelter, basic needs, services, case management, peer support, and connections to resources to empower individuals and families to secure a positive solution to their crisis.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Pathways For Men, Women, and Families with Children

Through Pathways, our signature program, we help people recover from the crises of homelessness, poverty, and addiction in three phases - Beginnings, Journey, and Departure. Clients and staff work together to set goals for recovery, jobs, benefits, and housing, and are held accountable to achieve those goals. At each phase, those in crisis take steps to achieve their best life possible by overcoming barriers and connecting to resources, with the support of an empowering community.

Population(s) Served

Through Essentials, we help those in crisis through a bed, meals, showers, and basic needs regardless of sobriety, addiction, or barriers. Clients in Essentials receive shelter on a first come, first served basis each night.

Essentials Emergency Stay is currently only available at our Men’s Shelter on a limited first come, first served basis each night. Services are prioritized for local residents and availability is subject to change due to the spread of the Coronavirus.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Substance abusers
Extremely poor people
Low-income people
Adults
Homeless people
Substance abusers
Extremely poor people
Low-income people
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of bed nights (nights spent in shelter)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, People with disabilities, Substance abusers, Veterans, Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals who reunited with family or other support systems

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Victims of crime and abuse, Families

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals who secured permanent housing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Adults, Families, Economically disadvantaged people, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals who connected with long-term recovery

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Substance abusers, Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The overarching goal of New Directions is to end homelessness, poverty, and addiction in the Grand Strand area and beyond. However, ending these crises is more than just a broad vision or effort. We work to see it happen every day, one life, one story at a time.

Working towards this ultimate goal, our other contributing goals are to:
1. Decrease the number of unsheltered homeless by increasing the availability of shelter.
2. Decrease the number of homeless episodes in our community by providing shelter and through programs designed to end homelessness.
3. Identify and address the underlying issues and barriers of those in crisis and connect them with the resources needed to end their crisis.
4. Increase both individual and collective self-sufficiency within the populations of both those at-risk of experiencing and/or currently experiencing homelessness, poverty, and addiction.
5. Fulfill the role of the crisis response to homelessness and addiction as the primary provider of shelter and peer support services to both Horry and Georgetown County.
6. Help those in crisis secure a positive solution through permanent housing, reuniting with family, or long-term recovery.

Our strategy to ending homelessness, poverty, and addiction is to help people move from crisis, to connection, to community. When life takes an unexpected turn, we stand ready to meet the most immediate and vital needs of those in crisis including shelter, meals, laundry & showers, basic needs, transportation home, and more. But beyond a safe place for those in need to lie down, rest, and regroup, we connect our clients with resources through case management and peer support, giving them the tools they need to change their circumstances. We help our clients through advocacy, goal-setting, life-coaching, reinstated legal documents, childcare placement and school enrollment, resume writing, job search assistance, training programs, disability and benefits navigation, personal growth, financial planning, and placement in detox and recovery communities.

By recognizing that each person has a different path towards taking a new direction in life - securing housing, reuniting with family, or placement in long-term recovery - our team works diligently to identify and help clients overcome barriers that may prevent them from achieving their goals.

We believe that although homelessness, poverty, and addiction are problems often caused by individual circumstances, their solutions are only found in community. And thanks to strong relationships with our partners, our clients benefit from a supportive, empowering community, filled with people and agencies dedicated to their success helping connect them with housing, mental health counseling, medical care, transportation, legal assistance, family services, and long-term recovery.

We value each person placed in our care and strive to instill the greatest gift - Hope. Hope that inspires us to move forward. Hope that carries us through difficult times. Hope that overcomes difficult circumstances. By providing basic needs, connections to resources, and the support of an empowering community, those in crisis know that at New Directions, Hope Starts Here.

Since 2013, New Directions has led the collaborative effort to assist the homeless in Horry County, SC and since 2016 we have led the effort to connect individuals with recovery solutions in both Horry and Georgetown Counties. Each year we provide approximately 60,000 nights of shelter to those in crisis and over 55,000 meals. Our staff has over 70 years combined experience in case management, nonprofit administration, and social services. In addition to a depth of experience to provide excellent service to our clients, New Directions partners with more than 90 agencies who provide services and resources to our clients. We focus on what we do well- providing basic needs, case management, peer support, and programs - and instead of duplicating services, we refer clients to agencies for services they may specialize in, such as physical and mental care, counseling, job training, life skills, legal issues, and more. Thanks to our partnerships, clients have access to an abundance of resources, all without duplication of effort.

As homelessness, poverty, and addiction has become growing issues in American society, we stand ready to assist those in need by providing shelter, a meal, basic necessities, and more, all for just $15 per person, per night. New Directions never closes, providing services 24 / 7 / 365, while saving our community over $15 MM per year.

New Directions was established in 2013 as a collaborative effort to better assist homeless, men, women, and families in our community. This effort was begun by consolidating three independent local shelters into one organization: Street Reach Ministries, a shelter for single men and women (est. 1994), LifeLine, a shelter for women and children who are victims of domestic violence (est. 2013), and the Center for Women and Children. These shelters were reorganized and reopened under the umbrella of New Directions and became New Directions for Men, New Directions for Women, and New Directions Snug Harbor Transitional Housing respectively. A fourth shelter, Myrtle Beach Haven, was opened in 2008, and became incorporated into New Directions in August 2015 as New Directions for Families.

Shortly after reorganizing these shelters under the New Directions umbrella, the organization implemented a comprehensive program that would go beyond the fundamentals of providing shelter, meals, and basic needs, but would tackle homelessness head on. Back To Work, Back To Life was established as New Directions’ signature program to identify and address underlying issues and causes of homelessness; addiction, mental health issues, legal issues, physical health issues, transportation, displacement, and more.

In 2016, we began adding program partnerships and initiatives to directly address the top barriers our clients face in their journey out of homelessness. In partnership with the City of Myrtle Beach, we added a Peer Support Program. In 2018, Coastal Carolina University Sociology began the Rolling Forward Project to provide free bike transportation at our shelters. Homeless Court, a voluntary diversion program through the City of Myrtle Beach Municipal Court, began, holding its first session in March 2019. In 2020, our Peer Support Program (now known as ARO) to provide peer support and recovery outreach to both Horry and Georgetown Counties.

In early 2021, as the result of an expanded peer support program, we began to pivot our programming to include onsite recovery solutions. We realized that we served more than just those experiencing homelessness, but also, those experiencing poverty and addiction. The Pathways program was created to provide the core focus of Back To Work, Back To Life – addressing underlying barriers of homelessness, poverty, and addiction by connecting individuals with resources – with the 12 Step Facilitation Method recovery model. This revamped program helps teach our clients “how to live again” while addressing issues and helping them develop a toolkit of resources for life beyond the shelter.

From Fiscal Years 2014 – 2020, New Directions served over 6,928 Men, Women, and Children, 392 Families through 423,768 nights of shelter and over 440,000 meals. During that time, 3,065 Individuals, 374 Families secured a positive solution to homelessness through permanent housing, reuniting with family, or placement in long-term recovery.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve anyone along the Grand Strand experiencing homelessness, poverty, and addiction and as a result, our clients represent all races, ethnicities, genders, family make-ups, backgrounds, disabilities, cultures, beliefs, and lifestyles. Understanding that many of our clients have not had the advantages of education, family, financial stability, or job opportunities, we advance individual and collective equity by helping them develop a toolkit of skills, resources and connections, empowering them to overcome previous disadvantages and current barriers.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Over the past year, we have piloted low-barrier, emergency overnight stays in a designated section of our Men's Shelter. This was in response to the desire of a portion of our current shelter - overnight shelter without having to participate in a structured program. 24 beds in current Men's Shelter were converted from program beds to an emergency beds, available first come, first served nightly. By making this change to accommodate the basic needs of clients who might be shelter-averse or service-resistant, this program, known as Essentials, has become a wonderful outreach to community homeless, providing a touchpoint for other resources and services, and increased awareness, readiness, and openness to our Pathways Program.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Feedback from those we serve gives our clients a stake in the future of the direction of our organization - our programming, services, and on-site resources. Client feedback over the years has helped contribute to needs analyses - helping us determine missing resources and shift/increase our capacity to meet those needs - including introducing new programs for mental health, legal issues, transportation, IDs, and addiction recovery. Although we are not able to accommodate every need, we strive to foster a culture of listening, always keeping attune to the voices of those we serve As a result, our clients are very open to dialogue about unmet needs, our programming, and our structure.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

NEW DIRECTIONS OF HORRY COUNTY
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

NEW DIRECTIONS OF HORRY COUNTY

Board of directors
as of 06/27/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Charles Jordan

Pearce Law Group

Tom Hudgins

Retired - Ernst & Young

Mary Jo Rogers

South Atlantic Bank

Alison Roark

South Atlantic Bank

Frank Hereda

Remax Southern Shores

Gregory Thompson

Coastal Carolina University

Zeb Thomas

Nelson Mullins

Liz Callaway

WTKN - The Liz Callaway Show

Trevor Greene

Sitetech Systems

Kerry Jardine

Pearce Law Group

Erica Guyton

Angela Pharr

Spectrum

Martha Sledge

Attorney - Retired

Patric Siniscalchi

Avis International - Retired

Bill Leedom

Charles Knuckles

Author; Certified Addiction Counselor & Mental Health Counselor

Amy Barrett

Myrtle Beach Downtown Alliance

John Pedersen

City of Myrtle Beach - Retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/27/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/27/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.