GreenHouse17

Nurturing lives harmed by intimate partner abuse.

Lexington, KY   |  GreenHouse17.org

Mission

GreenHouse17 is an advocacy agency committed to ending intimate partner abuse and its impact on families and our community. Just as a greenhouse protects and nurtures plants in harsh weather, we nurture lives harmed by intimate partner abuse. Serving 17 central Kentucky counties.

Ruling year info

2005

Principal Officer

Darlene Thomas

Main address

PO Box 55190

Lexington, KY 40555 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Bluegrass Domestic Violence Program

EIN

20-1965942

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our mission is to end intimate partner abuse and its impact on the community. Research and practice have proven the dynamics of intimate partner abuse often escalates when individuals are unable to access advocacy and services to establish safety. Risks are mitigated when victims access healing and self-sufficiency services, but survivors of intimate partner abuse in Kentucky must navigate complex socio-economic obstacles that complicate access to services. Poverty is among the most prevalent of these obstacles. Barriers in rural communities further threaten and complicate the healing journey for survivors. Common obstacles include lack of anonymity, shortages of healthcare providers, minimal or lack of health insurance, decreased access to community resources, and lack of transportation systems. In addition to these barriers, survivors in rural communities are confronted with a lack of affordable housing.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Shelter Services

GreenHouse 17 provides safe emergency shelter to families and individuals fleeing their homes due to intimate partner violence.  Our shelter property is located on 40 acres in eastern Fayette County.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

GreenHouse17 provides legal, medical, and housing services throughout our 17-county service area. We also provide individual and group counseling and credit repair courses to support stability after abuse. In addition to these services offered to survivors in the community, we provide educational training programs for students, professionals, and community groups.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our farm program provides survivors of intimate partner abuse with nature-based healing options on the 40-acre property that surrounds our emergency shelter, while also growing fresh vegetables for meal preparation in the shelter. When the adverse health effects related to intimate partner abuse are considered-- physical injuries, arthritis, chronic pain, and digestive issues to name a few--the importance of this goal is underscored. Survivors who choose to participate in the farm stipend project develop job skills and micro-enterprise experience.Generate revenue from the sales of produce, flowers, and products from the farm to support our core services. Our vision is for the farm to become a self-sustaining enterprise that generates profits to sustain our organization's operation expenses.

Population(s) Served
Adults

GreenHouse17 operates a 24 hour confidential crisis line.  Our crisis line received over 10,000 informational, service based and crisis calls in the past year.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Programming services children whose parents and families have a history of intimate partner abuse, child abuse or neglect, sexual assault, stalking, substance abuse, or other issues. Services commit to support safety, healing, and stability of children and custodial parent through monitored visitation and safe exchanges with non-custodial parent. And honors the importance of the parent-child relationship to the security and healthy development of children.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Parents

Where we work

Accreditations

Kentucky Coalition Against Domestic Violence 2021

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

Mary Byron Project Celebrating Solutions Award 2013

Kentucky Nonprofit Network Innovative Nonprofit Award 2013

Center for Nonprofit Excellence Pyramid Award for Innovation 2013

Kentucky Housing Corporation Innovation: Homelessness Award 2014

Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Environmental Award 2014

Number of nights of safe housing provided to families of domestic violence

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Shelter Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients who report a greater sense of purpose and improved overall wellness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of people who are safer because of services provided.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

GreenHouse17 programs and services respond to the needs of intimate partner abuse victims and encourage safety, healing, and self-sufficiency as they rebuild their lives as survivors. And in turn this creates a safer, healthier, and more prosperous community.

Our programming model is designed to meet basic needs, identify healing goals, and provide support and resources to improve the likelihood of achieving these goals, despite barriers. For some survivors, especially those with strong support systems and access to resources, safety and crisis stabilization can be achieved in only a few weeks. For others, especially those individuals and families who have experienced long-term abuse inclusive of physical, emotional, and financial violence, more time and assistance is needed to achieve these goals.

Our specially trained crisis counselors are available to help people harmed by intimate partner abuse any time of the day, every day of the year.

The agency's main facility is situated on a beautiful 40-acre property in rural Fayette County. From this location and three other offices throughout central Kentucky, GreenHouse17 provides comprehensive, wrap-around crisis intervention and stabilization services based in the trauma-informed care model.  

This means the agency honors that everyone responds to and heals from trauma in different ways. Specifically, trauma-informed care acknowledges need to be respected, informed, connected, and hopeful; connection between trauma and trauma symptoms, including substance abuse, depression, anxiety; and the value of collaborative approaches that empower survivors.

After immediate crisis and safety needs have been assessed and addressed, the following programming begins. The Welcoming Phase of our program introduces victims to our services while continuing to address basic needs such as safety, food, clothing, and medicine. Safety planning continues and legal protection options are explored during this initial phase.

The Healing Phase of programming focuses on individual and group support to understand the dynamics of abuse and address the physical, emotional, and financial consequences of abuse. Each day three support groups are facilitated at the agency's emergency shelter, and weekly support groups are provided throughout the agency's service area.

As healing begins, survivors prepare to secure stability, employment, and housing housing. Strategies include financial literacy curriculum that is tailored to the needs of victims, long-term safety planning, budget and credit counseling, participation in an Individual Development Account matched saving program, free tax preparation/EITC access, and housing counseling/placement assistance.

As the individual or family readies to exit shelter, the Launching Phase begins. Advocates help to ease the transition and continue to support survivors as they work to rebuild their lives after violence.

The farm that surrounds our emergency shelter facility provides survivors with nature-based avenues to heal from the physical and emotional trauma of intimate partner abuse; provides a sustainable source of field-to-table fruits, vegetables, legumes, herbs, and berries for meal preparation in the emergency shelter; and empowers survivors with information, resources, and access to self-sufficiency options, including micro-enterprise opportunities, by imparting employable skills related to agricultural production, manufacture of value-added products, and marketing of produce and goods from the farm.

Governance, fiscal oversight, and strategic direction are provided by our organization’s Board of Directors, composed of community leaders from financial, criminal justice, mental health, and social justice sectors. Our Executive Director, Ms. Darlene Thomas, M.S.S.W, is a 27-year advocate for survivors of power-based violence. A three-person Leadership Team and direct service staff who are Certified Domestic Violence Advocates deliver and monitor service provision. 

Our organization is dedicated to participation in community consortia to assure coordinated response to victim needs. Survivors also benefit from referral and coordination partnerships that provide substance addiction counseling; vouchers to obtain clothing and household supplies; emergency and re-constructive dental care for injuries sustained from abuse; safe visitation and monitored exchange services for children exposed to domestic violence; shelter-based and off-site provision of basic health care needs. 

We maintain a diverse fundraising model comprised of annually recurring and newly acquired federal, state, local, and private support to sustain the fiscal health of our organization. Annually recurring federal and state pass through funding received as a member program of the Kentucky Coalition Against Domestic Violence accounts for approximately a third of our annual budget; additional federal and local grant support sources comprises an additional third of our budget. Remaining funding includes varied support from subcontract agreements, private foundations, corporate sponsorship, and individual donors.

The following outcome goals are consistently met or exceeded by the organization:

100% of adults and children residing in emergency shelter report feeling safer than before entering shelter.
95% of adult and child survivors develop plans to maintain safety for themselves and their children in a variety of situations.
80% of adult survivors develop a case plan identifying needs, barriers, and advocacy related to safety and healing needs.
60% of adult survivors fulfill unique self-sufficiency goal, such as enrolling in college courses, developing new work skills, saving money to purchase a car, establishing permanent housing, etc.

Programming that responds to intimate partner violence is often fraught with very real and complex struggles related to the inherent nature of healing from trauma. As established providers of victim services with a comprehensive network of community partnerships, our organization is prepared to respond to these challenges with care, support, and advocacy to encourage survivor success.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Survivors of intimate partner abuse in central Kentucky.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome,

Financials

GreenHouse17
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

GreenHouse17

Board of directors
as of 07/18/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Katherine Love

Kentucky OneHealth

Term: 2018 - 2022

Kathy Love

Kentucky OneHealth

Teri Faragher

Domestic Violence Professional

Susan O'Brien

Financial Industry

Steven Lownds

Centre College

Griffin Johnson

Edward Jones

Jenna Gover

Robinson Hughes & Christopher, PSC

Robin McGuffin

Stites & Harbison, PLLC

Gretchen Bright

Big Ass Fans

Lawrence Weathers

Lexington Police Department

Finn LeChrista

Kentucky State University

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/11/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/14/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.