PLATINUM2023

Stupid Cancer, Inc.

Get Busy Living.

aka Stupid Cancer   |   New York, NY   |  http://stupidcancer.org

Mission

Stupid Cancer's mission is to empower adolescents and young adults (AYAs) ages 15-39 affected by cancer by ending isolation and building community.

Notes from the nonprofit

Each year, 72,000 young adults (ages 15-39) are diagnosed with cancer in the United States alone. That's one every eight minutes. This neglected group faces age-specific challenges - such as, infertility, loss of identity and independence, lack or loss of insurance, increased isolation, and stalled career development - with limited resources.

Stupid Cancer, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, is the largest charity that makes cancer suck less for those touched by young adult cancer. Founded in 2007 by Matthew Zachary, the innovative, award-winning and evidence-based programs and services of this organization serve as a global bullhorn to propel the young adult cancer movement forward.

Comprehensively addressing young adult cancer through advocacy, research, support, outreach, awareness, mobile health, and social media, Stupid Cancer proudly supports a global network of patients, survivors, caregivers, providers, and advocates.

Ruling year info

2005

Chief Executive Officer

Alison Silberman

Main address

40 Worth Street Suite 808

New York, NY 10013 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Steps For Living

I2Y I'm Too Young For This! Cancer Foundation

EIN

20-2027782

NTEE code info

Cancer (G30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (E01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (O01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Each year, 89,500 adolescents and young adults (AYAs) ages 15-39 are diagnosed with cancer in the United States alone. Not only is cancer the number one cause of death by disease in AYAs, but the cancer incidence in AYAs has increased more than any other age group while survival rates have not improved at the same rate. Compounding this, the AYA community faces unique challenges due to their cancer occurring during a crucial stage of their personal and social development including delayed diagnosis, financial distress exacerbated by nonmedical costs such as student loans and raising children, concerns about fertility preservation and family planning, and even in survivorship, reports poorer health outcomes including higher rates of obesity, anxiety, depression and heart disease. Stupid Cancer addresses these unique, life-changing challenges by providing age-appropriate resources, information and connections so our community can face their survivorship with dignity and Get Busy Living.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CancerCon

CancerCon® is a transformative weekend of education and connection. CancerCon Live provides the opportunity for all AYAs to build connections and community while gaining resources and information critical to their survivorship. By creating the space for our community to come together in person at CancerCon Live we are furthering our mission of ending isolation and responding to a growing need to reconnect. CancerCon is truly a unique experience for the adolescent and young adult cancer community to come together to Get Busy Living.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Adolescents
People with diseases and illnesses

Stupid Cancer Meetups are a space to have fun and connect with your peers that "get it" in a casual
environment. We don't shy away from heavy conversations, but there will definitely be laughs. Whether online or IRL, you will find your people here.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
People with diseases and illnesses
Young adults

Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) affected by cancer can share their experiences and connect with peers
through the power of storytelling at intimate storytelling events or online. You can browse our Story Library to read about your peers’ experiences or contribute your own at one of our intimate Storytelling Open Mic events or on our website

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Young adults

A month-long, topic-based Discussion Series allowing participants to engage in sustained, meaningful conversations with each other in a structured setting, led by trained professionals. We also host webinars as one-time programs that dive deep into big topics in a facilitated setting.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses
Adolescents
Young adults

A strategic initiative to develop an action plan to address the needs of AYAs in historically marginalized groups relating to their experiences during diagnosis, treatment, and/or support. Our aim is to ensure their needs are visible and addressed within Stupid Cancer, the AYA nonprofit space, and the larger
AYA oncology community.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Adolescents
People with diseases and illnesses
Ethnic and racial groups
LGBTQ people

Where we work

Awards

Most Innovative Use Of Social Media 2011

Classy Awards

Game-Changer Award 2010

LIVESTRONG

Best 50 Website Of Year 2007

TIME Magazine

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Across programs & direct communications, we connected with nearly 3300 individuals in the AYA community in 2022.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Social media is one of the ways in which we connect with the community. We have nearly 400K followers across our social media platforms.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Since 2007, Stupid Cancer has brought together thousands of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients, survivors, caregivers, and health professionals through our in-person and online programming. AYAs are an underserved and underrepresented patient population who face additional and unique challenges due to their cancer occurring during a crucial stage of their personal and social development. These patients, who are often unfamiliar with the medical system and may lack health insurance, deal with providers who are less likely to take their concerns seriously or rule out cancer because of their young age.

Our programs are designed to help AYAs “get busy living” by connecting them with the support, peers, and critical resources needed to improve their quality of life after diagnosis. Our educational programs provide an opportunity to learn from experts trained in AYA care about the topics that matter most, like mental health, sex, survivorship, fertility, and more. And at our social programs AYAs can meet and hear from peers to normalize their experiences and cement deep friendships.

By providing information tailored specifically for the needs of the age group and creating safe spaces for people to come together, Stupid Cancer supports a diverse community in ways that are meaningful to the individual. Our programs challenge and encourage attendees to look at their treatment and survivorship through various lenses to find what works best for them. As one community member said, "The doctors saved my life. Stupid Cancer saved my soul."

Working in the United States for over a decade, Stupid Cancer offers a menu of in-person and digital programming designed to build community and connect this population to age appropriate resources so they can GET BUSY LIVING. Since its founding in 2007, Stupid Cancer has succeeded in providing access to the life changing psychosocial support the AYA community needs and deserves. At present, Stupid Cancer has grown into an online community of nearly 400,000 cancer survivors, patients, caregivers, and AYA stakeholders.

Leadership, brand, community reputation and influence.

When we look at the vibrant and growing community of AYA cancer advocates, we see that Stupid Cancer's approach works. By creating spaces for our community to come together while also providing age-approparite information in a confusing and crowded healthcare space, Stupid Cancer has successfully broken through the noise to make cancer suck less. We have a consistent following of nearly 400,000 community members on our social media and regularly see repeat program attendance across our menu of offerings.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

Stupid Cancer, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Stupid Cancer, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 05/04/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

David Richman

Raymond James

Term: 2026 - 2017

Barry Klein

Macquarie Group

Susan Moser

Wilton Re

David Richman

Raymond James

Joshua Rivera

Moffit Cancer Center

Shannon Wyant

Taconic Capital Advisors

Ana Kilambi

Adobe

Lisa Romano

JP Morgan

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/4/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data