Center for Respite Care, Inc.

Restoring Health, Transforming Lives

Cincinnati, OH   |  www.centerforrespitecare.org

Mission

MISSION: Provide quality, holistic medical care to adult homeless people who need a safe place to heal, while assisting in breaking the cycle of homelessness. Founded in 2003 and currently located on the third floor of the St. Anthony Center, a recently formed service hub at Liberty and Republic Streets in Over-the-Rhine, the Center for Respite Care is a 24/7, 20 bed, medical facility serving single adults experiencing homelessness with acute medical needs. They are referred to the Center by local hospitals and other medical facilities. Since inception, just over 1800 people have been recipients of the Center’s services. Together with providing daily medical recovery support for the clients’ acute diagnosis, the Center also engages clients in intensive case-management, addressing barriers to discharging to a secure, appropriate, permanent setting. In the last fiscal year, the case management team achieved 601 community resource connections on the clients’ behalf. These included negotiating issues concerning housing, identification, job training, job placement, and the like, along with community support for chronic health / mental health and substance abuse needs. 78% of those discharged entered permanent housing, treatment or specialty programs, or other stable environments. To learn more about the Center’s mission visit us online www.centerforrespitecare.org.

Notes from the nonprofit

Since the COVID-19 global health crisis, the Center for Respite Care has needed to reduce the client census. As required by our state license, two rooms have been set aside for quarantine if needed. Client time out in the community has been restricted to only medical related activity. Trainings have been given to clients and staff on best practices of social distancing, hand washing and wearing masks, which have been made available to all. The clients are very compliant with the health and safety protocols that have been put in place. It is quite gratifying to see how supportive they are with each other as we go through this crisis together. As a tier one organization, vaccinations for clients and staff were made available beginning January. 100 % of clients opted to receive the vaccine.

Ruling year info

2005

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Laurel D. D Nelson

Main address

PO Box 14130

Cincinnati, OH 45250 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-2544994

NTEE code info

Nursing, Convalescent (Geriatric and Nursing) (E91)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Other Housing, Shelter N.E.C. (L99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Living on the street or in homeless shelters exacerbates existing health problems and causes new ones. Chronic diseases, such as hypertension, asthma, diabetes, mental health problems and other ongoing conditions, are difficult to manage under stressful circumstances and may worsen. Acute problems such as infections, injuries, and pneumonia are difficult to heal when there is no place to rest and recuperate. Moreover, individuals experiencing homelessness with no place to heal properly suffer complications at a very high rate which leads to higher readmission rates to local hospitals. In addition, hospital stays are longer and there are more frequent visits to the emergency room.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

From Medical Recovery to Independence

Medical Recovery: Staff addresses the pressing medical needs of the Center’s clients, including evaluations, limited lab tests, medication administration, nursing care, health education, and the coordination of medical, substance abuse and mental health services. Individuals have access to extended care following surgeries and other major medical procedures. In addition to addressing the medical needs of the individuals, we also provide a bed, three healthy meals each day, showers, laundry facilities, transportation to outside appointments, coaching on meal preparation and activities of daily living, and clothing as needed. At its heart, there is an educational dimension to this process. The goal is to help the client learn about their own acute and often chronic issues, illnesses, or disorders, and how to effectively treat and manage them. This includes understanding symptoms, medications, and the importance of regular and consistent communication with their healthcare providers.

Case Management Services: However, it is not just about their physical recovery. Using an extensive Social Needs Assessment, case management staff work diligently to engage in a collaborative process with the medical team, the client, as well as external agencies as they facilitate, coordinate, and evaluate an ongoing case plan, updated whenever necessary to meet the needs and preferences of the individual. The staff offers connections to community supports and most importantly, housing/permanent placement assistance. The case management piece is critical to bridging the gap between medical recovery and the goal of the client being discharged to a permanent, stable placement, having what they need for self-sufficiency, independence, and a place to call home – a direct tie-back to our mission.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Homeless people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women, Men, Homeless people, Health

Related Program

From Medical Recovery to Independence

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of adults experiencing homelessness and in need of medical recovery.

Number of homeless veterans served in Medical Recovery

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Health, Women, Men

Related Program

From Medical Recovery to Independence

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

As services for veterans experiencing homelessness have increased. The Center has seen a decline in veterans in our census. However, we are always open to providing our services to this population.

Average days in Medical Recovery before medically ready to be discharged

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health, Homeless people

Related Program

From Medical Recovery to Independence

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This measures the Center's occupancy rate. Most homeless adults say in the Center for roughly 49 days.

Percentage homeless adults who are discharged from Medical Recovery into an enviroment that is safe and secure, e.g., private home, shelter, group apartment, single apartment, treatment center, etc.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women, Men, Homeless people, Health

Related Program

From Medical Recovery to Independence

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Center for Respite Care receives referrals from all major area hospitals as well as clinics and shelters that serve the homeless. Our clients work with the Center's medical staff and case managers in the development of their wellness plan and their plan to enable them to enter a safe, stable, and appropriate environment when they are medically ready for discharge. To that end, the Center’s staff maintains relationships with local organizations throughout southeast Ohio and northern Kentucky who are working to end homelessness. The ultimate goal is to have our clients leave the Center with the necessary resources to achieve sustainable independence. The Center is the only agency in the geographic area that provides this service.

Program Goals Fiscal Year 2020-21 April 1, 2020 – March 31, 2021
1) Admit 130 homeless adults to Medical Recovery
2) Admit 6 homeless veterans to Medical Recovery
3) Maintain an average length of stay of 45 days
4) Strive for an occupancy rate of 80%
5) Move 80% of clients to appropriate facilities to assist in their transition to self-sufficiency after recovery.
Measurable Outcomes Fiscal Year 2020-21 April 1, 2020 – March 31, 2021
Measure #1: 65% will not return to homelessness for two years after discharge.
Measure #2: 73% who have completed the program will transition to permanent placement.
Measure #3: 90% are admitted and will complete a Social Needs Assessment within 48 hours.
Each client’s medical plan of care, treatment and progress are documented in individual client charts by physician and nursing staff. Social services, discharge plans and progress are documented in client’s charts by the case manager. Key data is entered into the client management information system (VESTA). This program allows us to track client data in an efficient and effective manner. Client charts undergo quality assurance audits, the results of which are reported to the program committee of the Center’s board of directors. Data is measured against goals and reported monthly. Outcome reports are issued to the Center’s Board of Directors at each meeting. Results are also used in proposals, newsletters, Annual Report, and any media where we can communicate community impact.

The Center is a premier medical respite center in the country with outcomes that far exceed those in other cities. Nearly 80% of the clients who complete our medical recovery program are discharged to a suitable environment that meets their needs – family member, apartment, or another recovery program. The Center is unique in the United States because it focuses on healing the entire person through medical care, case management, and support services. While patients are recovering from illness or injury, the case managers work with them to resolve issues that are keeping them homeless. Since its inception in 2003, over 1,800 homeless adults have called the Center home for a short-term basis. All of this underscores our effectiveness as a medical respite facility – and the only one in our region. The center was awarded the Medical Respite Award for Excellence because of our innovative and collaborative approach to treating individuals who are experiencing homelessness resulting in outstanding outcomes.

In 2016, the Board of Directors finalized a robust strategic plan that placed an emphasis on growing the mission in terms of number of people served and meeting homeless adults where they are – figuratively and literally. To that end, the Center launched a successful funding campaign in 2016 to pay for a strategic relocation from Avondale to the newly formed non-profit hub, St. Anthony Center, in Over-the-Rhine. We joined six other partnering agencies in December of 2017. The relocation brought a successful closing to the Center’s board of trustee’s previous three-year plan. With the guidance of an outside facilitator, the board and senior staff recently completed a new three-year plan, ratified at the board’s May 2019 meeting.

Since the COVID-19 global health crisis, the Center for Respite Care has maintained a lowered client census. As required by our state license, two rooms have been set aside for quarantine if and when needed. Client time out in the community has been restricted to only medical related activity. Trainings have been given to clients and staff on best practices of social distancing, hand washing and wearing masks, which have been made available to all. The clients are very compliant with the health and safety protocols that have been put in place. It is quite gratifying to see how supportive they are with each other as we go through this crisis together. Since closing down the Center to visitors, our volunteers and community partners have continued to provide support with food resources, and helping us secure ongoing wish-list items, including medical related items now in scarce supply – exam gloves, hand sanitizer, masks and the like. The daily response to the crisis strengthens these relationships as we move into the future. As we navigate the pandemic, the Center looks forward to strategically increasing our client census and again receiving volunteers and guests.

Moving into the future, the Center for Respite Care seeks to continue to be a partner in alleviating the overall poverty condition in greater Cincinnati through its services, which at their core are educational in nature. It means nothing for our case managers to find suitable housing for our clients now medically ready for discharge if they do not know how to "live" and function in an environment other than the outdoors, i.e., under a bridge, on the street, or on a park bench. We continue to seek out ways to enhance our Medical Recovery to Independence Program on behalf of our clients through learning and leisure programing and the ongoing expansion of relationships with organizations that can provide resources to our clients as they re-engage with the wider community.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Center for Respite Care, Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Center for Respite Care, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 4/23/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Christopher McClenathen

Cushman Wakefield

Term: 2016 - 2022

Michael Behme, CPA

BKD, LLP

Larry Neuman, JD

Stauss Troy

Damian Billy

Registered Architect

Mark Manley, MD

The Christ Hospital

Brian Antenucci, CFA

Barlett Wealth Management

Claude Blenman

Cisco Systems, Inc

Beverly Bokovitz, DNP, RN, NEA-BC

University of Cincinnati Medical Center

Rachel McKinney

Interact for Health

Ryan Hayes, PhD

University of Cincinnati

Edward Herzig, MD

Retired Physician

Cary Hines, CPA

BKD, LLP

Greg Jarvis

Hamilton County

Diana Klinedinst

Retired

Joseph Pflum, MD

Mercy Health

Martha Schueler

Retired

Christopher Tassone, JD

Frost Brown Todd, LLC

Lori Uphaus

Material Point, LLC

Corey Winfrey, Consumer

Bulbs Plus Batteries

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/16/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data