GOLD2023

HIGHWAY PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PRESERVATION & ENHANCE DIST INC

Working to preserve the Highway Park Community

aka Keep Highway Park Beautiful   |   Lake Placid, FL   |  http://www.hpng.org

Mission

Highway Park Neighborhood Council influences political, economic and social decisions through advocacy, beautification initiatives and educational programs that enhance the quality of life of our residents, senior citizens, veterans, youth and the community at-large.

Notes from the nonprofit

Our grass roots agency serves an unincorporated, marginalized community administered by Highlands County. The non-governmental Board of Directors are invited to serve by the residents and property owners. We have no governmental authority. However, we act as an advisory council on behalf of the community. We provide various programs to improve the community. We are Certified Packagers with USDA 502 Direct Loan housing program for first time low-income home buyers. We host festivals, food distribution & gardens, health fairs, workshops, computer & financial literacy, agribusiness, free computer training, and sponsor the US Hwy 27S Veterans Memorial. We are sustained by fundraisers, grants, sponsors, and donors. Our Wele Youth Leadership Program (9th - 12th grades) promotes leadership, entrepreneurial skills, civic engagement and volunteerism. We host senior citizen, veterans and kids' programs. In 2022, we expanded our 502 Self Help Housing Program to serve all of Highlands County.

Ruling year info

2012

President

Ms. Tiffany Green

Vice President

Sarah Sholtz

Main address

P. O. Box 1678

Lake Placid, FL 33862 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-2728475

NTEE code info

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Environmental Beautification (C50)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our agency seeks to improve our community aesthetically, socially, culturally and economically. Highway Park is a low-income, primarily minority community with few options, negligible economic opportunities, too many dilapidated buildings, little government interest, a low tax base, and many of the problems inherent in such neighborhoods. The agency is providing sound programs & policies (in conjuction with Highlands County government, police, etc.) designed to improve the infrastructure, improve amenities, enhance the physical apprearance of the area through clean-ups and beautification programs, working with Code Enforcement to eliminate blight, hosting a number of educational programs (GED, Financial Literacy, etc.), hosting all community meetings to gain support/buy-in/feedback, etc. The agency is working to restore and preserve this historic community and return it to viability.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Veterans Memorial & Mini-park

First community sponsored Veterans Memorial & mini-park developed in the Highway Park community. This park commemorates the service to our nation's armed forces by all veterans

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Adults

Multi-ethnic, multi-disciplinary festival presenting the cultural diversity and history of the Highway Park Community. The annual program features cultural and artistic expressions (film, music, dance, culinary art, and other folklife performances), provide educational opportunities, children's learning activities, and senior programs. Voice of the Ancestors segment of the presentation include interviews with the elderly in the community who are given an opportunity to preserve the oral history of the area. The festival features traveling museums on African-American history and other entertainment and educational interactions.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Adults

Arts program designed to give our community opportunities to learn about art and to inspire art appreciation with art classes, workshops, festivals, exhibits and youth after school and summer alternatives while providing an avenue for artistic expression for all within the community.

The arts form a catalyst for change. Programs include "Art in Public Places" with sculptures, painting, and other artistic expressions including murals, painting benches, sculptures & more. This program creates a vibrant arts scene to help restore viability to this small community.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Adults

Great American Cleanups are conducted in Spring and Fall of each year. This program is held in conjunction with Keep America Beautiful, Highlands County Waste Management Program, and local volunteers.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

Financial Literacy workshops focused on helping local residents improve credit ratings, qualify for low-rate mortgages, and improve family budget. Six week series hosted bi-annually.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

The Wele Youth program is an entrepreneurial, leadership development and educational program consisting of hands on activities, workshops, and training programs which culminate with planning, marketing, and operating a small business. Through workshops and hands-on management our youth develop business skills. They select and operate the business, learn how to negotiate prices, handle vendors, and invest/reinvest, manage a budget, develop a marketing plan, conduct a competitor analysis, and more. They develop all collateral materials (T-shirts, marketing materials, posters, banners, etc.) and market the business through various media outlets. They determine staffing requirements and learn how to recruit and interview staff. As each Wele participant completes the courses, he/she will become part of the management team to help new participants through the course. This entire program revolves around practical application and on the job training. The goal is to develop leadership capacity and bonding for the youth within the community and surrounding areas. It is a “living curriculum” which goes beyond lecture to practical application.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Adults

To help promote more healthy life styles we provide annual health fairs and free screenings in the community. During the health fairs, health professionals provide information on a variety of health topic especially prevalent in the community such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, congestive heart failure, communicable disease in a program designed to inform the public on health issues of significance to the community. Our free health screenings provide basic health examinations for general health issues and referrals to local health resources as warranted.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Highlander Award - 501c3 of the Year 2022

Highlands County

Affiliations & memberships

Keep America Beautiful 2013

Highlands NAACP Community Service Award 2016

Keep America Beautiful Presidents Circle 2017

Keep America Beautiful Presidents Circle 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of suppliers with whom the SME/Coop/Enterprise has an agreement, contract, or ongoing business relationship as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Semi-Annual Great American Cleanups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Highlands County Sheriff's Department's COP/ADAPT for community safety and children's programs. Highlands County Waste Management for community clean up efforts and Highlands County Code Enforcement

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Wele Youth Leadership Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Economic development workshop, Wele Youth leadership and financial literacy workshops attendance by members of the community

Number of streets cleaned

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Semi-Annual Great American Cleanups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Annual Adopt-A-Street clean up campaign supported by Florida Department of Transportation's annual Keep Our Paradise Litter Free campaign

Number of homeowners/tenants rating their feeling of safety in and around their homes as satisfactory

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Semi-Annual Great American Cleanups

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of people in the community who attend all community meetings and expressed their improved feelings of safety as a direct result of our efforts.

Number of new grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

"Dare to Dream" Arts & Cultural Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Grants received: Florida Department of Transportation, Lake Placid Noon Rotary, Florida Division of Cultural Affairs, Florida Humanities Council, Florida Blue, Keep America Beautiful

Number of press articles published

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Highlands News Sun and Soul City Magazine coverage of multiple events including GAC, opening of Veterans Memorial Mini-park, restoration of historic cemetery, etc.

Number of donations made by board members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

"Dare to Dream" Arts & Cultural Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All board members donate to the agency on an annual basis and support individual programs through financial donations as well.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our overarching goal is to improve the quality of life in Highway Park by providing public parks, public education, healthy living initiatives, encourage business development, rehabilitate homes, and foster grassroots activities to improve the resources of our community. The organization has long term strategic goals and short term goals of 1 - 2 years for projects and initiatives. The organization is striving to have Highway Park included in the Greater Lake Placid Vision which is a 10 year plan for the incorporated portions of Lake Placid and include Future Land Use improvements, new neighborhoods, and new businesses development. Our unincorporated community was excluded from these plans initially which would undermine growth in our community while expanding opportunities outside of the Highway Park Community.
We believe that parks, arts programs, businesses, and a clean, safe community means happy, healthy kids, and a brighter future for all.

The Highway Park Neighborhood Council will achieve its mission by developing sound and comprehensive planning with stratetic and interim goals to ensure optimum impact and efficiency:

a) Effective board development,
b) On-going collaboration with businesses, government, and our community
c) Effective operational plans with measurement criteria, timelines, and measurable outcomes
d) Effective program development and management (consistent with our mission)
e) Fundraising & financial management
f) Membership development
g) Effective communication systems
h) Administrative systems & management
i) Frequent engagement and communication with community stakeholders
j) Sound fiscal management and stewardship
k) Robust programs that engage all
l) Diverse programs welcoming to all

The Highway Park Neighborhood Council is small and the tasks we are undertaking are monumental. However, the expertise and experience of our board of directors and network of volunteers helps propel the organization forward. We have a well-educated and experienced team of volunteers with deep ties to Highway Park. We are guided not only by philanthropy but a strong commitment to the community. This is our hometown and we are vested in its success for future generations.

a) Executive Director Evelyn Colon, holds a Master in Business Administration and over 20 years of management experience.
b) President, Tiffany Green, holds a Master in Community Planning and over 10 years of experience and a military background a
c) Vice President, Sarah Sholtz, is a Registered Nurse and leads the organization's health initiatives
d) Treasurer, Teddy Callahan, is a successful local business owner
e) Other staff and volunteers include teachers, administrators, business owners, and residents.

This award winning agency has positively impacted the economy, social structure and culture of this community in very positive ways. We have developed parks for recreation, a resource center for community use, hosted health fairs and festivals, designed and launched innovative programs for young adults, and so much more. Our Wele Youth Leadership program is in its 2nd year and has shown positive results and growth. We host annual health fairs and cultural events. We have renovated historic buildings and the historic cemetery. We have advocated for amenities (1st sidewalks in this 90+ year-old community, US Hwy 27 beautification in front of our community, picnic areas, etc.) and removed over 92 tons of debris, hosted all community meetings, educational workshops, arts programs and so much more.

Next step is to launch a Farmers Market and community garden to boost the economy and improve the health of local residents.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals, To plan future programs as identified by the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

HIGHWAY PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PRESERVATION & ENHANCE DIST INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

HIGHWAY PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PRESERVATION & ENHANCE DIST INC

Board of directors
as of 05/30/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Tiffany Green

Highway Park Neighborhood Preservation & Enhancement District

Term: 2022 - 2024

Tiffany Green

Affiliation

Sarah Sholtz

Affiliation

Teddy Callahan

Affiliation

Patrice Ayala

Affiliation

Dennis Crenshaw, Sr.

Affiliation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/14/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/03/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.