Capital Region Land Conservancy, Inc.

Protecting the Places and Land You Love

Richmond, VA   |  www.capitalregionland.org

Mission

The Capital Region Land Conservancy is Central Virginia’s only land trust dedicated solely to serving the City of Richmond and Chesterfield, Henrico, Hanover, Goochland, Powhatan, New Kent and Charles City counties. Our mission is is to conserve and protect the natural and historic land and water resources of Virginia’s Capital Region for the benefit of current and future generations.

Ruling year info

2006

Principal Officer

Parker C Agelasto

Main address

P.O. Box 17306

Richmond, VA 23226 USA

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EIN

20-2797635

NTEE code info

Land Resources Conservation (C34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Our Land and Water

Do you often wonder what the Richmond area will look like in 20 years?  Think about how the region has changed over the past 20 years. Will that scenic drive along open meadows or forests look the same?  The counties surrounding the City of Richmond have been rapidly developing, and this growth is often fragmented.  There is currently a crucial need to preserve strategic natural areas in order to ensure continued safe drinking water for the region.
 Our Land and Water is a program to improve and protect water quality in the Richmond area by protecting from development lands which significantly impact water quality. The Capital Region Land Conservancy works to accomplish this goal by educating landowners about land conservation tools, facilitating the creation of conservation easements, particularly in riparian (river and stream bank) areas, and educating the community about the importance of preserving undeveloped land in order to improve and protect the area’s water quality.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Land Trust Accreditation Commission 2019

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

Virginia's United Land Trusts 2006

Virginia Conservation Network 2006

Land Trust Alliance 2006

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of stakeholders/stakeholder groups with whom communication has been achieved and expectations shared

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Our Land and Water

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CRLC communicates mostly with the broader public via email and social media as well as community festivals and events. This metric represents our email subscribers.

Acres of land managed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Our Land and Water

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CRLC (co)holds conservation easements on public and private lands and made its first land acquisition with the purchase of Malvern Hill Farm in 2018.

Number of acres of land protected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Our Land and Water

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CRLC works to educate landowners about the benefits of land conservation and helps facilitate easements with other holders more suited for the particular goals of the owner and property.

Number of national media pieces on the topic

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Our Land and Water

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CRLC's work was mentioned in the Richmond Times-Dispatch and The Washington Post.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

GOAL 1: Strategic lands are preserved and managed to protect their conservation values
1. Identify and prioritize the most important parcels for potential protection
a. Arrange access to GIS-based data to allow analysis and prioritization
b. Develop a strategic conservation plan
c. Identify public parks in region and prioritize them for preservation
d. Identify and protect high value connectors
2. Facilitate or hold conservation easements or fee-title ownership on appropriate lands
3. Steward the conservation values of land protected
4. Consider viable opportunities to hold easements outright and own land in fee

GOAL 2: Have the organizational structure and stable base of financial support to permanently protect lands
1. Strengthen and develop the Board of Directors and Advisory Board
a. Further engage all Board Committees in organizational management
b. Engage in active succession planning for leadership
2. Create a donor-centric internal culture that engages everyone in fundraising activities
3. Update the Fundraising Plan and develop the financial support necessary to achieve our mission
4. Draft an annual Business Plan
5. Initiate a planned giving program and consider an endowment
6. Develop the professional staffing to guide management of the Conservancy
7. Become accredited

GOAL 3: Increase the organization’s relevance to the community and build a conservation ethic
1. Identify and prioritize key audiences and the best tools to reach them
2. Explore playing a key role in development of new community trails and green spaces
3. Participate in public events and activities that reach target audiences
a. Provide opportunities for the public to utilize protected land for educational purposes and access to nature
b. Collaborate with similar conservation and cultural groups to educate the community
4. Provide information targeted to landowners and their advisors
5. Advocate for public policies and programs that support conservation efforts on a selective basis
a. Consider becoming an Land Trust Alliance Advocacy Ambassador
b. Develop personal connections with local, state, and federal legislators and officials
6. Build more name recognition and public enthusiasm in the Conservancy
a. Conduct effective public relations
b. Engage in dialogue with diverse segments of the population to learn about how the Conservancy can best serve their needs
c. Explore involvement in developing a Buy Fresh Buy Local chapter

GOAL 1: Strategic lands are preserved and managed to protect their conservation values
1. Identify and prioritize the most important parcels for potential protection
a. Arrange access to GIS-based data to allow analysis and prioritization
b. Develop a strategic conservation plan
c. Identify public parks in region and prioritize them for preservation
d. Identify and protect high value connectors
2. Facilitate or hold conservation easements or fee-title ownership on appropriate lands
3. Steward the conservation values of land protected
4. Consider viable opportunities to hold easements outright and own land in fee

GOAL 2: Have the organizational structure and stable base of financial support to permanently protect lands
1. Strengthen and develop the Board of Directors and Advisory Board
a. Further engage all Board Committees in organizational management
b. Engage in active succession planning for leadership
2. Create a donor-centric internal culture that engages everyone in fundraising activities
3. Update the Fundraising Plan and develop the financial support necessary to achieve our mission
4. Draft an annual Business Plan
5. Initiate a planned giving program and consider an endowment
6. Develop the professional staffing to guide management of the Conservancy
7. Become accredited

GOAL 3: Increase the organization’s relevance to the community and build a conservation ethic
1. Identify and prioritize key audiences and the best tools to reach them
2. Explore playing a key role in development of new community trails and green spaces
3. Participate in public events and activities that reach target audiences
a. Provide opportunities for the public to utilize protected land for educational purposes and access to nature
b. Collaborate with similar conservation and cultural groups to educate the community
4. Provide information targeted to landowners and their advisors
5. Advocate for public policies and programs that support conservation efforts on a selective basis
a. Consider becoming an Land Trust Alliance Advocacy Ambassador
b. Develop personal connections with local, state, and federal legislators and officials
6. Build more name recognition and public enthusiasm in the Conservancy
a. Conduct effective public relations
b. Engage in dialogue with diverse segments of the population to learn about how the Conservancy can best serve their needs
c. Explore involvement in developing a Buy Fresh Buy Local chapter

Integrity and Excellence
We embrace the highest ethical standards and operate with complete transparency. We strive to earn and maintain the trust of landowners, donors, partners and the general public.

Collaborative Decision-making
We work collaboratively to assist our partners and to help craft conservation solutions that best serve our communities.

Permanent and Voluntary Land Conservation
We are committed to voluntary methods of land conservation, such as conservation easements, that will permanently conserve natural and historic lands throughout Virginia’s Capital Region.

Relevance to Our Community and Sense of Place
We are dedicated to sustaining our region’s healthy communities and strong sense of place.

Responsible Stewardship
We are committed to the long-term monitoring and management of permanently protected lands.

Excellence
We hold ourselves to the highest performance standards and employ the most advanced and innovative practices in the conduct of our work.

Celebrating its 10th Anniversary, the CRLC has facilitated the protection of over 6,800 acres of property and co-holds 9 conservation easements with more than 1,200 acres. These include the 220-acre James River Park in the City of Richmond and over 100 acres in Chesterfield County for the use as the future Atkins Acres Community Park.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Capital Region Land Conservancy, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Capital Region Land Conservancy, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 08/14/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Bill Greenleaf

Virginia Community Capital

Term: 2020 - 2021

Bill Greenleaf

Virginia Community Capital

Tad Thompson

Tuckahoe

Dan Jones

Gallier Meyer Real Estate

Mark Endries

Luck Stone

Philip Reed

McLean-Faulconer, Inc.

Wortie Ferrell

Davenport

Carol Wampler

Retired

Heather Barrar

Friends of the Lower Appomattox River

Brandt Stitzer

Hirschler

Mark Merhige

Preston Bryant

McGuire Woods Consulting

Phil Dawson

Pediatrics Associates of Richmond

Valerie Burton

City of Richmond Parks & Recreation

Sarah Richardson

Retired

Kevin Engel

Engel Family Farms

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/4/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/04/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.