PLATINUM2022

TERANGA RANCH

Educate, Save, Coexist

Sunland, CA   |  http://www.terangaranch.org

Mission

Teranga Ranch is a wildlife education organization that seeks to educate Californians about local wildlife and teach them how to coexist. We go to schools and home owners association meetings. We hold community meetings when there is a perceived wildlife issue, like coyotes. We bring humane hazing devices to pass out and we discuss humane alternatives to poison, traps and guns. We teach community classes about local wildlife, we present workshops and we host Field Trips. We provide opportunities for anyone to get outside and involve themselves with wildlife, nature and Science.

Ruling year info

2006

Executive Director

Ms. Dana Stangel

Main address

PO Box 4222

Sunland, CA 91041 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-3199189

NTEE code info

Citizen Participation (W24)

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The problem is a lack of basic understanding about the local native wildlife that surrounds us daily. It leads to people unnecessarily using poison, traps and exterminators. It leads to people injuring or killing wildlife. It leads to the death of pets who were not protected in their yards or on leashes.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Coyote Education Program

We are surrounded by coyotes and other wildlife. Sometimes they take pets from yards. We do education at Homeowners Associations, Schools, Parks and more to teach people pet safety around wildlife.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

We visit schools and other public institutions to educate the general public about animal conservation, biology, and responsible pet ownership.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

We spend about 45 minutes doing an interpretive presentation about local bats including natural history, physiology and behavior. Then we do a short (1 mile or less) hike to find some and listen to them with our high tech bat detector!

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

Teranga Ranch has a local depredation program. If you find yourself in a position where your chickens (or other small livestock) are being predated by a wild animal, we will investigate the situation, reimburse you (at least in part) for your lost animal, and teach you how to reinforce your coop or build the perfect pen to prevent future attacks

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of paid participants on field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

COVID limited our field trips in 2020 and 2021.

Total number of fields trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of wildlife care situations resolved without animal intake

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Raccoons, rats, peacocks and other native wildlife who were persuaded to leave on their own instead of having exterminator or animal services called.

Total number of free performances given

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Coyote Education Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Free educational events

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Talks, presentations and programs

Number of different periodicals published

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Backyard Wildlife Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Wildlife column in local newspaper

Total number of guided tours given

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Coyote Education Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Educate the public about coexisting with local native wildlife without the use of poisons or traps.
Educate the public about protecting their pets and livestock from wildlife.

Programs and Presentations- we spend a lot of time at meetings (homeowners associations, kiwanis, schools, etc....) discussing coyotes and other backyard wildlife.
Classes- we do all sorts of classes from focusing on one member of the wildlife community to doing a comprehensive look at many of them.
Fieldtrips out to see native wildlife in the wild.

We have a few very dedicated volunteers and a strong passion to educate.

We've educated thousands of people in the Los Angeles area. We've talked about 15 people out of using traps for raccoon issues. We've built reinforced chicken coops in yards. We've built wildlife proof enclosures. We've conducted fieldtrips up the Central Coast, into Kern County and throughout the Los Angeles area.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently

Financials

TERANGA RANCH

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

TERANGA RANCH

Board of directors
as of 10/24/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dana Stangel

No Affiliation

Term: 2005 -

Dana Stangel

No Affiliation

Terry Deasy

No Affiliation

Wendy Walters

No Affiliation

Geri Sue Cox

No Affiliation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/24/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/24/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.