Mental Health, Crisis Intervention

Foundation for Recovery, Inc.

aka ForRecovery.org   |   Las Vegas, NV   |  www.ForRecovery.org

Mission

Foundation for Recovery’s mission is to promote the positive impact of recovery from substance use and co-occurring disorders and enhancing the lives of individuals and families affected by the disease of addiction. Our programs and partnerships open pathways to recovery by removing social barriers and creating opportunities for those seeking and maintaining long-term recovery.

Ruling year info

2006

Executive Director

Mrs. Dona M. Dmitrovic MHS

Main address

4800 Alpine Place, Las Vegas, NV Suite 12

Las Vegas, NV 89107 USA

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EIN

20-3380211

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Alcohol, Drug and Substance Abuse, Dependency Prevention and Treatment (F20)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (G01)

Alcohol, Drug Abuse (Prevention Only) (F21)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Addiction, mental illness, and co-occurring disorders - like other chronic diseases such as heart disease or asthma - are treatable. Stigma linked to these conditions often prevents people from seeking the help they need. Yet, more than 23 million American adults consider themselves to be in recovery from drug and alcohol abuse and their stories show us that recovery is possible. Foundation for Recovery’s mission is to promote the positive impact of recovery from substance use and co-occurring disorders and enhance the lives of individuals and families affected by the disease of addiction. Our programs, services, and partnerships open pathways to recovery by removing social barriers and creating opportunities for those seeking recovery.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Nevada Recovery Resource Directory

The Foundation publishes the Nevada Recovery Resource Directory, which contains a wide range of up-to-date information on support groups, treatment centers, recovery homes, social service agencies, and drug-free leisure and recreational activities. The Resource Directory contains sections in English and Spanish.

Population(s) Served
Adults
General/Unspecified
Budget
$13,000

FFR offers a comprehensive array of evidenced-based peer recovery support services, including one-on-one support, telephone-based support, mutual aid support groups, life skills classes, and sober social activities. The program’s foundation is the value of the lived experience of peers to assist others in achieving and maintaining recovery. Services are designed and delivered by Peer Recovery Support Specialists (PRSS) who are properly trained through a 46-hour curriculum and have two or more years in long-term recovery.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

FFR offers several training modules and the most prominent ones include: 1) Peer Recovery Support Specialist Training (PRSS), a comprehensive, 46-hour training for those with lived experience who want to mentor those seeking long-term recovery from substance use and/or mental health disorders, as well as continuing education classes needed to renew certification after two years. The PRSS Training is the only “in-person” training in Nevada recognized by the Nevada Certification Board (NCB). 2) Recovery Leadership Academy, a series of courses designed to educate, guide, and inspire members of the recovery community to serve in leadership roles. 3) Overdose Prevention Training/Narcan education to the community and family members. Attendees learn how to recognize overdose symptoms and perform rescue breathing and administer Narcan/Naloxone, along with treatment options for opioid users. Life-saving Narcan/Naloxone kits are provided to each participant during training (subject to availability).

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
Adults

"The Rooms" is a facility that offers low-cost meeting space for 12-step fellowships and other support groups. "The Rooms,” located centrally in Las Vegas, are available for meetings 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, 365 days a year. Over 2,300 support group meetings are conducted at our facility annually.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified
People who abuse drugs, alcohol, or other substances

FFR staff is certified as a CRAFT Training Facilitator. The organization also facilitates a Family Support group, a free program for family members and friends who are concerned about someone close to them that has a substance use disorder.

Population(s) Served
Families

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Foundation for Recovery mobilizes resources within and outside of the recovery community to assist Nevadans in achieving sustained recovery from substance use disorders (SUDs) and mental health issues. Peer-based recovery support services, education, and advocacy are the strategies through which the organization’s mission is achieved. Recovery Support Services FFR offers a comprehensive array of evidenced-based peer recovery support services, including one-on-one support, telephone-based support, mutual aid support groups, life skills classes, and sober social activities. The program’s foundation is the value of the lived experience of peers to assist others in achieving and maintaining recovery. Services are designed and delivered by Peer Recovery Support Specialists (PRSS) who are properly trained through a 46-hour curriculum and have two or more years in long-term recovery. Education FFR offers a variety of trainings and the most prominent ones include: 1) Peer Recovery Support Specialist Training (PRSS), a comprehensive, 46-hour training for those with lived experience who want to mentor those seeking long-term recovery from substance use and/or mental health disorders, as well as continuing education classes needed to renew certification after two years. The PRSS Training is the only “in-person” training in Nevada recognized by the Nevada Certification Board (NCB). 2) Recovery Leadership Academy, a series of courses designed to educate, guide, and inspire members of the recovery community to serve in leadership roles. 3) Overdose Prevention Training/Narcan education to the community and family members. Attendees learn how to recognize overdose symptoms and perform rescue breathing and administer Narcan/Naloxone, along with treatment options for opioid users. Life-saving Narcan/Naloxone kits are provided to each participant during training (subject to availability). Advocacy FFR collaborates with state and local policymakers to promote recovery-friendly policies, end discriminatory practices, and eliminate stigma. Additionally, FFR provides the community with practical tools and skills needed to engage in effective stigma reduction efforts. Advocacy-oriented activities are held year-round and include the annual Recovery Rally to increase awareness and understanding of mental and substance use disorders and celebrate the people who recover, which is held in observance of the National Recovery Month. Other activities include the Recovery Advocacy Day and Recovery Town Halls organized in partnership with Recovery Advocacy Project. Foundation for Recovery serves as a bridge between diverse communities of recovery, the addiction treatment community, governmental agencies, the criminal justice system, the larger network of health and human services providers, and the broader recovery support resources of the extended community (e.g., housing, education, and employment).

Foundation for Recovery mobilizes resources within and outside of the recovery community to assist Nevadans in achieving sustained recovery from SUDs and mental health issues. Peer-based recovery support services, education, and advocacy are the strategies through which the organization’s mission is achieved. Recovery Support Services FFR offers a comprehensive array of evidenced-based peer recovery support services, including one-on-one support, telephone-based support, mutual aid support groups, life skills classes, and sober social activities. The program’s foundation is the value of the lived experience of peers to assist others in achieving and maintaining recovery. Services are designed and delivered by Peer Recovery Support Specialists (PRSS) who are properly trained through a 46-hour curriculum and have two or more years in long-term recovery. Education FFR offers a variety of trainings and the most prominent ones include: 1) Peer Recovery Support Specialist Training (PRSS), a comprehensive, 46-hour training for those with lived experience who want to mentor those seeking long-term recovery from SUD, as well as continuing education classes needed to renew certification after two years, including Advocacy, Ethics and Confidentiality, Mental Health First Aid, Self-Care, and much more. The PRSS Training is the only “in-person” training in Nevada recognized by the Nevada Certification Board (NCB). 2) Recovery Leadership Academy, a series of courses designed to educate, guide, and inspire members of the recovery community to serve in leadership roles. 3) Overdose Prevention Training/Narcan education to the community and family members. Attendees learn how to recognize overdose symptoms and perform rescue breathing and administer Narcan/Naloxone, along with treatment options for opioid users. Life-saving Narcan/Naloxone kits are provided to each participant during training (subject to availability). Advocacy FFR provides the community with practical tools and skills to help them engage in effective stigma reduction efforts and collaborates with state and local policymakers to promote recovery-friendly policies, end discriminatory practices, and eliminate stigma. Each September, FFR holds the Recovery Rally in observance of the National Recovery Month to increase awareness and understanding of mental and substance use disorders and celebrate the people who recover. Other activities include the Recovery Advocacy Day and Recovery Town Halls organized in partnership with Recovery Advocacy Project.

Founded in 2005, FFR is a statewide 501(c) 3 Recovery Community Organization headquartered in Las Vegas (southern Nevada) with a satellite office in Sparks/Reno area (northern Nevada). FFR is Nevada's leading statewide peer-run recovery community organization (RCO) founded and led by people in recovery and family members of people in recovery. It is currently supported by 22 full-time and 2 part-time staff members who are people in recovery and/or family members of people in recovery. Staff members are also certified by the Nevada Certification Board. Since its inception, FFR has been the primary provider of peer-led recovery support, peer recovery support training, advocacy, and sober social activities for substance use and co-occurring disorders. FFR’s offers a peer-run Recovery Community Center in Las Vegas; peer recovery support; mutual aid support groups; life skills classes; High School Equivalency (HSE) tutoring and testing; parenting classes; Mental Health First Aid; Suicide Prevention Trainings; Women’s Empowerment Series, training and education; and hosts the annual events such as the Rally for Recovery and Recovery Awards Dinner. All services are available to the public at no cost. Additionally, FFR is certified by Nevada's Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Agency (SAPTA) to provide 0.5 level early intervention services, which include curriculum-based educational experiences. FFR is a member of Faces & Voices of Recovery’s Association of Recovery Community Organizations (ARCO) and is accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Peer Recovery Support Services (CAPRSS).

At the organizational level, FFR routinely collects evaluation data which includes outputs and outcomes. The most common outputs include the number of individuals served, the number of individuals trained, and the number of individuals attending mutual aid support groups, sober social activities, and special events. With regards to outcomes, individuals receiving peer recovery support services are guided to develop his or her individualized Recovery Plan which includes specific Recovery Capital Measures in the SAMHSA's eight domains of wellness. Recovery Plans will be built around each person's Recovery Capital. The initial intake provides a baseline for the current situation and is the starting point of comparison. It also evaluates a person's resources, skills, and strengths as well as barriers that need to be addressed to achieve recovery goals across each of the life's eight dimensions. Subsequent coaching sessions help determine a participant’s change in their attitudes, perceptions, and feelings about themselves and their recovery. Their progress can be documented as reductions in barriers, symptoms, substance use, levels of worry, crisis interventions, etc., and/or as increases in quality of life, coping abilities, medication adherence, social network and support, daily functioning, illness management, self-esteem, rate of employment, having a safe place to live, earnings, etc. Other outcome data is derived from satisfaction surveys. For federally-funded projects, FFR has contracts with external evaluators to conduct evaluations. At the macro-level, the effectiveness of peer-delivered recovery supports was examined by two rigorous systematic reviews and research published between 1995 and 2014. Both concluded that there is a positive impact on participants (Bassuk, Hanson, Greene, Richard & Laudet, 2016; Reif et al, 2014). Taken as a whole, the current body of research suggests that people receiving peer recovery support may experience: increased self-­esteem and confidence, increased sense of control and ability to bring about changes in their lives, raised empowerment scores, an increased sense that treatment is responsive and inclusive of needs, increased sense of hope and inspiration, increased empathy and acceptance, increased engagement in self-care and wellness, and increased social support and social functioning, decreased substance use and depression, reduced hospital admission rates, and longer community tenure. For more information, please refer to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s publications, including "Peer Support" and "Peers Supporting Recovery from Substance Use Disorders."

In 15 years since its inception, FFR has become Nevada’s leading and thriving Recovery Community Organization providing effective services for individuals and families impacted by substance use disorders and/or mental health issues. In 2019, more than 1,000 Nevadans utilized FFR’s direct peer recovery support services and over 29,000 individuals attended support group meetings hosted by The Rooms located in southern Nevada. FFR’s Peer Recovery Support Services Training is recognized by the Nevada Certification Board and it is the only in-person training available in Nevada. With peer recovery support services becoming eligible for billing through Medicaid in Nevada with specific treatment provider types in 2016, FFR continues to meet the growing need for this training across Nevada. More recently, FFR’s two staff members completed an extensive two-day CRAFT Family Support Facilitator Training and were certified as CRAFT Training Facilitators and serve Nevada’s only certified facilitators. Additionally, FFR compiles and publishes the Nevada Resource Directory, the only state resource that focuses on substance abuse and recovery-oriented resources including treatment centers, recovery housing, counselors, social services, support groups, and recovery friendly activities. Thousands of copies of this bilingual publication are distributed annually. Over the years, FFR has significantly expanded its reach to conduct community-wide outreach and provide services where they are needed the most, which include hospital emergency departments, detention centers, jails, behavioral health clinics, and areas frequented by individuals experiencing homelessness. Most recently, FFR has launched a dedicated program to serve the rural and frontier communities in Nevada. FFR’s advocacy efforts celebrated many victories, including the defeat of an assembly bill, AB194, proposed during Nevada’s 79th Legislative Session (2017) that would have created unnecessary barriers for people to receive peer recovery support services; the unanimous passage of the assembly bill, AB367, proposed during Nevada’s 80th Legislative Session (2019) also known as "the anti-stigma bill" which amended language in state law referring to people with SUD using person-centered language rather than “addict” or “alcoholic,” and the passage of SB459 which included the Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act known as NRS435C in 2015 which protects people with limited immunity from prosecution when reporting an overdose to the police, 911, poison control center, medical facility; assisting another person in reporting; caring for a person who is overdosing while waiting for medical assistance, or bringing the overdose victim to a medical facility. With the passage of SB459, Nevada now meets all 10 of the Trust of America’s Health indicators. FFR will leverage its statewide presence with two offices in southern and northern Nevada to effectively engage and serve residents in urban and rural areas.

Financials

Foundation for Recovery, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Foundation for Recovery, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 8/18/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Stuart Smith

Central Recovery Treatment

Hunter Smith

Philanthropist

Stuart Smith

Central Recovery Treatment

Lynn Baumann

No Affiliation

Jack Hovenier

LightWear Indutries

Billy Ryan

Scottsdale Intervention

Elizabeth Fildes

Touro University

Dave Caloiaro

CCSD School Social Worker Program Manager

Don Kuhl

Synergy Sotheby's International Realty

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Keywords

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