SILVER2024

Roaring Fork Valley Horse Council

KeepHorsesOnTrails

aka RFVHC   |   Snowmass, CO   |  http://rfvhorsecouncil.org

Mission

The Mission of the RFVHC is to provide a unified voice for equine related interests by working to preserve access to trails, promoting charitable involvement in equine related experiences and activities, educating the public on equestrian issues, providing connections and resources for the equine community, and supporting the overall well‐being of horses and horsemanship.

Ruling year info

2010

Current President

ms Karin Reid Reid Offield

Vice President

Rheta Fulton

Main address

PO Box 127

Snowmass, CO 81654 USA

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EIN

20-3576588

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (D01)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (Y12)

Equestrian, Riding (N69)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

RFV Covid-19 Hay Bank

The RFVHC, in cooperation with End of the Trail Rescue from Olathe, CO, in 1920-21& 22 established a Covid-19 HayBank program. Hay was made available to those in need at either a discounted rate or at no cost. The primary goal of this program is to keep animals IN THEIR HOMES. When disasters such as this current pandemic occur, animals become unable to be cared for at an exponential rate. If we can assist our fellow community members and their animals through this crisis - we can prevent an increase in starving, neglected and unwanted horses and other large animals, not to mention help people keep their beloved animals with them.

Population(s) Served

The Roaring Fork Valley Horse Council is involved with the BLM and other partners in building a 12 mile horse and hiking only trail, the beautiful Crown Jewel Horse Trail. This spectacular trail will traverse Crown Mountain to the Divide Parking Lot at the top of Prince Creek Road and West Sopris Creek Road. The views are breathtaking, there are looped rides if you prefer a shorter distance and the parking is easy to access, safe and excellent. This trail is not open to bicycles or 4-wheelers.

We are pursuing various avenues for grants, and no matter our source of funding the Horse Council will provide a minimum of $3-5000.00 this year adding to the $4000.00, which we spent last year on trails. We are proud to announce that we worked with partners Rocky Mountain Youth Corps; the RF Outdoor Volunteers; and the Roundup Riders of the Rockies; with additional supporters Pitkin County Open Space and Trails; Bob and Sue Pietrzak; Diana and Howard Vagneur and Western Adventures Inc.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Aspen Fire to coordinate a Large Animal Rescue class taught by experts from the Front Range to help train and equip a valley-wide Large Animal Rescue response team.
This class by both law and fire agencies in response to multiple large animal incidents. They will be training a multi-disciplinary team consisting of not only law, fire and EMS responders but also Veterinarians from the valley.


They offer two courses. The First Course is targeted at the Awareness/Operations level responders on how to operate around large animals to keep the responders and animals safe. The Second Class is a two-day hands-on Technician Level Training attended by
representatives from all law and fire agencies in the valley, the DOW and Forest Service.

There have been large animal calls in Pitkin County recently and to be more prepared as a valley to respond to these incidents whether a horse stuck in an overturned trailer, an elk stuck in a pond, a large animal stuck or an animal injured on a trail.

Population(s) Served

In years past, Glenwood Vet Clinic and Zoetis gave away 40 vaccines, bringing awareness to our valley about the CoreEQ vaccine that inoculates horses against Rabies, Eastern Equine Encephalitis, Western Equine Encephalitis, Tetanus and West Nile Virus. These are all diseases that we do not want in the RFV valley and can be transmitted via vectors or other animals.

The RFVHC asks all our members to reach out to your friends that own horses to tell them about this vaccine need in our valley. of free vaccines.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We asked, and You answered! In 2021 RFV Horse Council sponsored a Trail Survey for Hikers and Horseback Riders, with 25 Questions about Trails & the Equestrian Access to Truck and Trailer Parking in the Roaring Fork Valley. So, in the respondents own words, in 2022 the RFVHC included their advice, their reactions and their hopes providing these comments and solutions for solving the signage and parking problems and the multi-use conflicts. There are 12 Roaring Fork Valley trails covered in these documents. In 2023, the RFVHC Survey Monkey Results and Recommendations will be posted on our website www.rfvhorsecouncil.org/trails

Population(s) Served

With several years of trails grants with the Rocky Mountain Youth Corps, the RFVHC Board of Directors directed use of the RMYC labor with our partners to work at Sutey Ranch removing old homestead barbed wire and creating safer travel for wildlife, horses and hikers enjoying the Sutey trails. This is an ongoing summer project.

In 2021, the RMYC crew removed approximately 1 mile of barbed wire fence totaling approximately 1,000lbs. The wire and about 2/3rds of the t-posts were recycled at Green Zone in Silt. In 2023, comparable work was completed.

Sutey Ranch is managed for Wildlife Habitat year-round and is open to hikers and equestrians from April 15 through November 30th. The Red Hill Bike Access Trail - called the Northside Access Trail to Red Hill SRMA - is open from June 1 September 30th. No other routes on Sutey Ranch are open to Mountain Bikes.

Population(s) Served

In the summer of 2021, the RFVHC, together with the Rocky Mountain Youth Corps, TOSV and a team of RF Outdoor Volunteer leaders improved this trail last week. The two-day work was made possible through the generosity of our partners, RFVHC members and by a grant from the Round Up Riders of the Rockies. In the summer of 2023, RFVHC has the potential of a work week with the Rocky Mountain Youth Corps. The lower section of the Upper N. Mesa Trail needs improvement.

Equestrians and hikers will immediately notice the trails improvements. Based on the preference from crew leaders of RMYC, the crew remained together for both days of trail work. The first day and a half was spent rerouting the upper section around the pond. This included clearing existing brush and sage, scratching in a trail, and completing the finish work of tread. The remainder of the project was spent corridor cutting from the reroute back down trail to lower fork.


Population(s) Served
Adults
Families
Adults
Families
Farmers
Artists and performers
Academics
Adults
Families
Artists and performers
Academics

What to do when you encounter people with horses on the trails. A safety action plan in the United States and Canada
Roaring Fork Valley Horse Council (RFVHC) President, Karin Reid Offield and the Michigan Trails Advisory Council Equestrian Representative (MTAC) Jenny Cook are pleased with the success of the plan and the copyrighted RFVHC Trail Sign. These quotes below are a few of the reactions since the safety action plan was rolled out in the spring of 2023 as an American Trails webinar. For more information on the Trails Safe Passing Plan (TSPP) Stop! Speak and Stand Back please go to https://rfvhorsecouncil.org/trails-safe-passing-plan-tspp.html.
We hope with the endorsement of the sign by USFS, BLM, DNR, BCHA, State Horse Councils and local open space officials, this safety action plan will help everyone feel welcome and safe. Karin adds, We want to thank the Equine Land Conservation Resource (ELCR) for helping us get the word out about this important trail education.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups
People with disabilities
At-risk youth
Retired people

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It's all a lot of work, we try to get it all done. We are a volunteer Board of Directors/no staff

Financials

Roaring Fork Valley Horse Council
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Roaring Fork Valley Horse Council

Board of directors
as of 01/27/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Karin Reid Offield

President


Board co-chair

Susan Cuzio

Secretary

Susan Cuzio

Holly McLain

Marty Schlumberger

Sam Johnson DMV

Rheta Fulton

Alexandra Anwyl-Davies

Karin Reid Offield

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/12/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

No data

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability