ADOLESCENT WELLNESS

Wellesley, MA   |  www.adolescentwellness.org

Mission

The goal of Adolescent Wellness, Inc. (AWI) is for every youth to grow into maturity without developing symptoms of anxiety or depression. AWI helps pilot or promote prevention and referral resources that are easy to bring into your home and community. The activities enhance skills in: problem solving, coping and referral.The mission is to prevent 1 case of depression for every 22 healthy youth AWI reaches.

Ruling year info

2006

President

Mr. Robert Anthony

Main address

103 Old Colony Road

Wellesley, MA 02481 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-3591894

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Management & Technical Assistance (F02)

Pediatrics (G98)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Peer Leadership & Depression Prevention

Training teens to co-facilitate mental health and wellness curricula significantly improves outcomes of Knowledge, Attitude, and Confidence in Help-seeking. AWI collaborates with Boston Children's Hospital and Rotary International delivering this program anywhere.

Population(s) Served

AWI piloted activities for children 10 and older to enhance resilience. They are hosted within the Numedeon collaborative game site and have been exercised by 18,000 children.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students measurably improving pre- to post test Knowledge, Attitude, and Confidence in Help-Seeking.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Peer Leadership & Depression Prevention

Context Notes

The same questions are answered before and after the intervention provided by Boston Children's Hospital in the form of a curriculum, BREAK FREE FROM DEPRESSION.

Number of middle school students improving health-related attitudes and behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

virtual Wellness Center

Context Notes

Activities for supplemental coping skills development (detailed in Chapter 4 of the curriculum BREAK FREE FROM DEPRESSION) are provided in formats suitable for ages 10 and older.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Adolescent Wellness, Inc. (AWI) acts to simplify the prevention of mental illness and its most tragic symptom, suicide. AWI promotes activities for all children to practice balancing the weight of life’s worries with the relief of skills and knowledge. These problem solving skills and social supports strengthen their ability to overcome challenges and crises. AWI's five year goal is to help 100,000 youth measurably improve their coping skills and knowledge.

The design of our self-tutorials and other resilience activities is informed by best practices; achieving our goal is estimated to prevent depression from occurring in over 4.500 individuals. (“The number needed to treat to prevent one case of depressive disorder was 22.” ~Am J Psychiatry 2008; 165:1272–1280). The activities optimize the interaction of our thoughts and behaviors, cognitive-behaviorism, and are developed by McLean Hospital, the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology, and Boston Children’s Hospital.

The problems of mental illness are widespread - about a quarter of us will experience symptoms of mental illness, ranging from depression or anxiety to schizophrenia. Early treatment is important for optimizing outcomes and prevention of some cases is possible for the most common mental illness - depression. Lifetime prevalence rates for depression are at least 9.3% (Wittchen et al. 1998) and may be as high as 24.0% (Lewinsohn et al., 1993) of the US population.

The median age for depression symptom onset is 15 so prevention activities must be practiced by younger ages. We know that educating 22 healthy youth with coping skills and knowledge prevents one case of depression. The AWI strategy is to help keep young kids healthy. Since 2006, AWI has collaborated with health care providers, educators, clergy, parents and directly with youth. We have assisted with curricula development, activity development and piloting programs.

We have no need to 'reinvent the wheel' because we are within an hour of leading researchers, providers and educators. We collaborate with McLean Hospital, Boston Children's Hospital, Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology, and South Shore Hospital. What is known is what is effective for preventing depression; what is unknown is how to promote these activities with a large number of children. For example, engaging and easy to implement wellness curricula have been adopted by schools slowly, implemented by less than 1% of schools after three years. AWI will continue to facilitate school implementation but our priority is to provide children direct access to activities developing wellness skills and knowledge.

AWI has unusual capacity for assisting with pilot projects and its connections facilitate collaboration among organizations. AWI is a volunteer organization; key resources are contracted as needed. Pilot projects often need speed and flexibility more than large dollar amounts, perhaps as simple as renting space for a focus group or to hire consultants in creative problem solving. AWI has facilitated parent and clergy workshops, sponsored Train The Trainer workshops for educators, and assisted in piloting curricula with McLean Hospital, Boston Children's Hospital, South Shore Hospital and the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology. Most recently, AWI facilitated the design and funding of a virtual Wellness Center suitable for ages 8 and older to access directly, 24/7

In the month just completed, the virtual Wellness Center has been accessed by 868 unique individuals to use self-tutorials, access tip sheets and participate in on-line discussion forums.

Financials

ADOLESCENT WELLNESS
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ADOLESCENT WELLNESS

Board of directors
as of 6/18/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr Chip Douglas

No affiliation

Term: 2003 - 2018

Robert Anthony

Penny Wells

Phyllis Schnitman