The Tia Foundation

Self-development strategies in health for rural Mexico

aka Tia   |   Phoenix, AZ   |  www.tiafoundation.org

Mission

Tia's mission is to bring access to lifesaving healthcare and preventative education in the poorest remote places where there are no doctors or medicine through Tia's self-sustaining, teach them to fish program.

Notes from the nonprofit

Vision: Tia visualizes a world where communities work together to attain good health for all and use the tools and self-confidence acquired through Tia's program to address other areas of need, such as water quality, education, and economic development.

Using a “teach them to fish" model, the Tia Foundation trains and equips community health workers, elected by their fellow villagers, in remote parts of rural Mexico, where there are no doctors. We accomplish this permanent, sustainable solution for less than $5 a person, because the local governments take over continuing education and resupply of the robust medical kits each health worker is given. Tia's 320 Promotores currently serve more than 130,000 villagers. Our health workers provide vaccinations, deliver babies, manage chronic diseases like diabetes, and offer preventative education. An unintended outcome of programs like Tia's has been a drop in immigration by as much as 400% to the U.S.

Ruling year info

2006

CEO/President

Ms. Laura Libman

Main address

P.O. Box 36203

Phoenix, AZ 85067 USA

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EIN

20-4159280

NTEE code info

International Relief (Q33)

Management & Technical Assistance (E02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In the poor rural communities of Mexico, even tiny, spartan health clinics are scarce. Most communities rely on infrequent visits from volunteer doctors. Homes have dirt floors and typically lack electricity, plumbing, or even doors and windows. Families struggle to put enough food on the table, despite spending long days farming the mountain soil with unmechanized farming tools. Often providing a clean environment for childbirth, or treating the most basic illnesses and injuries are close to impossible. Since many of these people live more than a twelve hours’ walk from the nearest hospital and only dream of owning a vehicle, women still die in child birth. Young children are undernourished and vulnerable to the common cold and dysentery. Fresh vegetables and meat are hard to come by, while salt- and sugar-laden packaged foods inflict diabetes, hypertension, and malnutrition on entire communities. The lack of such essential services can mean the difference between life and death

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Promotoras Program

-To provide access to healthcare to geographically remote rural communities -To work with residents and village leaders to identify and train a Community Health Worker (CHW) for each community -To improve nutrition and sanitation in the communities served -To create school vegetable gardens to alleviate malnutrion -To offer education and availability of resources to ensure independence and sustainability to all residents -To establish emergency self-insurance funds -To replicate this model in other rural communities

Population(s) Served
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people who have access healthcare

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Indigenous peoples

Related Program

Promotoras Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We train and equip Promotoras (Community Health Workers) in remote rural areas of Central Mexico who have no other access to healthcare.

Number of health workers trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Indigenous peoples

Related Program

Promotoras Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our health workers learn midwifery and prenatal care, emergency and first aid, diabetes diagnosis, management and prevention, nutrition and geriatric care.

Number of health education trainings conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Indigenous peoples

Related Program

Promotoras Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Each of our trainings is at least a week of instruction and includes Promotoras training, village health workshops and primary/secondary health education.

Number of health/hygiene product and/or tools of care (mosquito nets, soap, etc.) administered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Indigenous peoples

Related Program

Promotoras Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number 60 represents the number of medical kits distributed, which each contain hundreds, so tens of thousands of health products have been distributed plus the items in our free clinic consults

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Tia envisions the future of our program providing a broader scope of services in our free healthcare consultations, i.e. chemistry panels that screen blood and urine for disease, and water quality tests. We would also like to expand the curriculum of lifesaving skills that our community health workers master in our classes. By developing stronger relationships with our education partners, Tia aims to work in new states in Mexico and bring healthcare to more of the remote rural poor.

We are strengthening our relationship with our education partners who have medical school facilities in various states in Mexico. Working with the university system, Tia plans to move into new and more remote regions across the country. By transferring knowledge and experiences taken from projects, our current mobile medical lab in Jalisco, with our current education partner, we can improve and expand scope and efficiency as we work with new medical schools in other states, thus serving tens of thousands of indigent farmers in a much broader geographic area.

The Tia Foundation has already achieved massive success and aims to increase its momentum. We are exploring new funding options and working with universities to bring care to the more people. Collaborating with our board of directors, suppliers and education partners, we are constantly assessing the most impactful ways to use and obtain funding.

The Tia Foundation has been in operation for over 15 years and has brought free lifelong sustainable healthcare to over 472,000 people in 5 states in across Mexico We have trained 942 community health workers who can give injections, deliver babies, and much more. While Tia puts on a project, we hold free public healthcare consultations, psychiatric care is available, and a mobile laboratory. Our dream is to bring healthcare access to every person in Mexico. With the help of our donors, community health workers, education partners, and volunteers we continue our efforts toward that noble end.

Financials

The Tia Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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The Tia Foundation

Board of directors
as of 2/9/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Laura Libman

The Tia Foundation

Laura Libman

The Tia Foundation

Shelley Detwiller DiGiacomo

DDP Legal

Katie Smith

Compass

Kate Bartholomeusz

Grameen Foundation

Matt Jewett

Mountain Park Healthcare

Diego Milan

Cindy Yeager

Thunderbird for Good

Scott Reising

Glacial Till Capital

Alex Nepogodiev

Abbott

Cassie Chandler

Suzie Moreno

BCBS of AZ

Dale Lillard

Lansdale Semiconductor

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/17/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/17/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.