International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security

The Global FoodBanking Network

aka The Global FoodBanking Network

Chicago, IL

Mission

The mission of The Global FoodBanking Network (GFN) is to nourish the world’s hungry through uniting and advancing food banks.

Ruling Year

2006

President and Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Lisa Moon

Main Address

70 E. Lake Street Suite 1200

Chicago, IL 60601 USA

Keywords

food waste, hunger, international development, international relief, food security, nutrition, food, children, sustainability

EIN

20-4268851

 Number

0351060715

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

Other Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition N.E.C. (K99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

Hunger is a solvable problem. Yet, two billion people suffer from moderate or severe food insecurity, meaning they are hungry or at risk of hunger. Without intervention, the lives of those who are hungry and malnourished are stripped of their potential – their health, employability, labor productivity, and ability to raise thriving children all suffer. Although the greatest concentration of chronically hungry people is in extremely poor countries, more than 25% of the chronically poor and 50% of the chronically malnourished live in emerging economies, where there are few public resources to help. In these communities, meeting the needs of the hungry often falls to community-based non-profit organizations, which struggle to nourish the poor and hungry on shoe string budgets and with limited access to training and know-how. Meanwhile, approximately 15-30% of food in emerging economies is wasted. Hunger is often not a food problem but a logistics problem.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Uniting and Strengthening Food Banks

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of clients served

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

In 2018, GFN food bank partners served 9,600,000 people.

Pounds of food distributed

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

In 2018, GFN food bank partners distributed 1.1 billion pounds of food to people in need.

Number of agencies served

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

In 2018, the food banks in the GFN network distributed food to over 55,681 agencies serving people in need.

Number of countries engaged

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

In 2018, GFN engaged with food banks in 34 countries.

Number of food banks engaged

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

In 2018, GFN connected 943 food banks around the world.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

The Global FoodBanking Network (GFN) envisions a world where people facing hunger can reliably access nutritious meals through food banking, one of the most promising, community-based solutions to hunger. Food banks source food from all segments of the supply chain and then deliver it to an established network of community agencies serving vulnerable populations, thus providing budget-relieving food support at a fraction of the cost while simultaneously mitigating environmental degradation. The results are more hungry people are fed, less food is wasted, and more charitable dollars are spent on addressing the root causes of hunger instead of purchasing food at retail costs. GFN’s goals: - Increase the number of people served, especially the most vulnerable - Increase the pounds of food and grocery product distributed - Increase the number of agencies served - Grow the GFN network by increasing the number of food bank members

GFN provides food banks with the resources and know-how needed to better serve those facing hunger. Training and knowledge sharing opportunities are delivered through a variety of ways including the Food Bank Leadership Institute, GFN’s e-Learning platform, and leadership development/ orientation. GFN certifies food banks to assure that every food bank follows established legal, financial, and operational protocols. Many global partners view GFN certification as a third-party seal of approval validating the food bank’s operations. This can result in stronger support from global partners, leading to more food, funds, volunteers, and other resources critical to a food bank’s growth and effectiveness. GFN accelerates the impact of its network food banks by offering capacity-building programs – such as strategic grants, customized technical assistance, global partner engagement, fellowship exchanges, and child hunger initiatives – to enhance efficiency, scalability and food distribution.

GFN currently serves food banks in more than 40 countries. In 2018, 943 food banks in the GFN system distributed 1.1 billion pounds of food to over 55,600 agencies serving 9.6 million people. GFN is fortunate to have on staff technical experts who have spent their careers developing and refining the food banking model. GFN is the only truly global organization uniting food banks worldwide. Additionally, GFN works with multinational organizations in the public and private sector and acts as a convener for food banks, related industry experts, and the international development community. In line with its growing programmatic offerings and impact, GFN is a recognized thought leader in the sphere of hunger relief and food waste. GFN raises awareness on the global stage about the efficacy of the food bank model and how the global movement of food banking is contributing to the Sustainable Development Goals.

GFN is committed to transparency and evidence-based, mission-driven evaluation. GFN sets goals for each of its global programs and works on a case by case basis with each member food bank to develop specific strategic targets to sustainably deliver more nutritious food to those in need. As GFN implements global programs and provides customized support to each food bank, GFN monitors results against targets for relevant indicators. To measure its reach, GFN tracks the number of member food banks in its network. To measure its impact, GFN sends an annual survey to its member food banks to collect quantitative and qualitative data. GFN’s key impact indicators are: - Pounds of product distributed - Number of agencies served - Number of people served

GFN currently serves food banks in more than 40 countries. In 2018, 943 food banks in the GFN system distributed 1.1 billion pounds of food to over 55,600 agencies serving 9.6 million people. GFN’s intensive technical assistance in areas such as food sourcing, inventory control, agency management, food safety, and organizational governance, has enabled food banks to establish and refine operational protocols, thus resulting in more effective food banks that are poised to grow. In addition to technical assistance, GFN’s growing capacity-building grant program provides time-bound investments to enable capacity expansions that are then supported on an on-going basis by resources procured in the food bank’s local community. Grants are leveraged by GFN members in many ways including expanding food sourcing strategies, building out cold chain capacity to increase distribution of fruits, vegetables, proteins and dairy, and designing programming that serves vulnerable populations such as children.

How We Listen

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

Source: Self-reported by organization

the feedback loop
check_box We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
check_box We shared information about our current feedback practices.
How is the organization collecting feedback?
We regularly collect feedback through: electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), community meetings/town halls.
How is the organization using feedback?
We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.
With whom is the organization sharing feedback?
We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders.
What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?
It is difficult to: it is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback.
What significant change resulted from feedback
We developed our Incubator program in Africa and Asia due to feedback from food banks in our network seeking greater GFN support for developing new food banks in these regions. Our communication strategy has been adapted to provide regular, consistent information to the food banks from a designated relationship manager. Lastly, we changed our annual survey from a paper survey to an electronic one after feedback from a focus group.

External Reviews

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Accredited Charity 2018

The Center for High Impact Philanthropy's High Impact Giving Guide - Featured charity 2019

Awards

Honoree 2019

The Barry & Marie Lipman Family Prize at the University of Pennsylvania

Affiliations & Memberships

SDG2 Advocacy Hub 2020

Friends of Champions 12.3 2020

Financials

The Global FoodBanking Network

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  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes