PLATINUM2024

RAYO DE SOL INC

Sharing Hope with Children and Families in Nicaragua

Kennesaw, GA   |  www.rayodesol.org

Mission

Rayo De Sol is an organization committed to serving God and ministering to children in Nicaragua through sustainable community development initiatives.

Ruling year info

2006

Executive Director

Peter Schaller

Main address

3775 Cobb International Blvd.

Kennesaw, GA 30152 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-4281339

NTEE code info

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Rayo de Sol works in the department of Matagalpa, in northern Nicaragua. Poverty levels are high in this area and social services are limited. Conditions of chronic poverty affect all members of the community, particularly children. Many children suffer from malnutrition and other preventable health problems, which often affect their permanence in the education system. Many children also abandon school if their families can't afford basic school supplies. Child labor is common and is another cause of school desertion and increases risks for many children. Although poverty is more complex than a simple lack of income, many of the problems we face are caused by lack of financial resources. Poverty is systemic and can affect all aspects of life. Poverty affects physical well being, emotional and psychological health. Our challenge is to design programs that address the diverse needs of children and families who are subjected to the cycles of chronic poverty.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education

Access to quality education can change the trajectory of a child’s entire life. Unfortunately, many children and youth in Nicaragua face social and financial obstacles that make it nearly impossible to stay in school, as reflected by the fact that only 43% of primary school students make it to the sixth grade.

Working hand in hand with the Nicaraguan Ministry of Education, we strive to remove every obstacle and give children the opportunities they need to unlock their God-given potential.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of teachers trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Professional Development training provided to 225 teachers.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Nutritious lunch provided to children at 36 public schools.

Number of students who receive scholarship funds and/or tuition assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

800 high school, technical and university scholarship students

Number of trees planted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

6,500 arboles sembrados

Number of patient visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

4500 patients treated in community clinics

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

358 adults participating in vocational education and economic development activities

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our main program areas are designed to empower children, families and communities to address the daily challenges of living in chronic poverty. Our first challenge is to create hope so that change is truly possible. The process of change begins when we begin to create opportunities. Our specific goals are:
- Contribute to the spiritual health of children, adolescents and adults through discipleship activities
Improve the quality of education in public preschools and primary schools
- Increase enrollment and retention in public preschools and primary schools
- Reduce the incidence of malnutrition in children
- Reduce the incidence of common pathologies in children
- Improve access to secondary, technical and university education
- Provide technical training for adults, in order to develop pertinent job skills
- Create opportunities for sustainable income generation
- Mitigate the impact of climate change through reforestation and organic agriculture

We have worked to develop integrated strategies for both rural and urban communities, that respond to the most pressing issues. Our strategy begins by applying a participatory model in which community members have opportunities to analyze needs and propose solutions. Our participatory model includes children, adolescents, teachers, parents, and community leaders. When given the chance to participate in the process, community members are much more invested in ensuring successful implementation.

Another element of our strategy is to build partnerships as a means for improving service delivery. By working closely with both public and private organizations, we are able to offer better quality services and retain a health cost-benefit ratio. We currently have active partnerships with at least 10 local partners, both governmental and nongovernmental organizations.

Lastly, we employ monitoring and evaluation practices to gauge success. Continual analysis of our programs is critical.

Our greatest asset is our staff. We have worked hard to selected qualified and dedicated staff. In addition to screening for technical capabilities, we also screen for the level of commitment to creating positive social change. While this is difficult to measure in a human being, we rely on field tests and performance reviews for feedback.

We provide regular training for staff, so that they may continue to develop new skills and abilities. The process of continual learning promotes organizational growth and sustainability.

Also, we have worked to create a management system based on the principles of stewardship and efficiency. We utilize our financial and material resources in the more effective way possible. Our staff is also trained in effective resource and time management, in order to create the greatest impact with the most responsible use of resources.

We have already seen great progress in improving basic health and education indicators. School enrollment and retention have improved by more than 15% since beginning. Academic performance has also improved, as a result of educational quality initiatives. There are more young people that have been continuing their secondary, technical and university education as well. We have also seen more families with access to potable water and productive opportunities for improving environmental conditions in their communities. We have also fostered the growth and development of several micro-enterprises that are allowing families to generate income.

Our next phase of development will be to provide more technical training and small business support, as a means of increasing income generation capacity. This will allow many parents to solve some of the most pressing economic issues that affect their families. We will also be providing more health services as there is are pressing needs.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

RAYO DE SOL INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

RAYO DE SOL INC

Board of directors
as of 04/08/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Stephen Hasner


Board co-chair

John Hoover

Brent Nix

Heather Hasner

Brittany Hoover

Sara Nix

Darrin Austin

Sandra Austin

Rodney Brown

Daniel Castro

Richard Willingham

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/11/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/08/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.