Jacobs & Cushman San Diego Food Bank

aka North County Food Bank   |   San Diego, CA   |  https://sandiegofoodbank.org/

Mission

The Jacobs & Cushman San Diego Food Bank provides nutritious food to people in need, advocates for the hungry and educates the public about hunger-related issues.

Notes from the nonprofit

To make a donation to the Jacobs & Cushman San Diego Food Bank, visit our donation page here: https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/weblink.aspx?name=E33999&id=3

Ruling year info

2006

President & CEO

Mr. James A. Floros

Main address

9850 Distribution Ave

San Diego, CA 92121 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

North County Food Bank

EIN

20-4374795

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Hunger is everywhere—down the street, at work, at the senior center, on the playground. Currently, 486,000 individuals in San Diego County is food insecure—they don’t always know where their next meal will come from—that number includes 163,000 children.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food 4 Kids Backpack Program

The Food 4 Kids Backpack Program provides backpacks full of nutritious, child-friendly food to 3,300 school children at more than 40 schools across San Diego County. Children who are eligible to receive free meals at school during the week through government programs but aren't receiving the nutrition they need over the weekends are eligible to receive Food Bank backpacks. Chronically hungry children are identified by teachers and school staff using guidelines and warning signs for hunger. Every Friday, the children are provided backpacks filled with food that is nutritious, nonperishable, and easily consumed. Once a month, additional food is included in backpacks for their families. Backpacks are distributed and collected for refilling at the beginning of the next week. Confidentiality and discretion are always a priority and parents of participating children are requested to sign approval forms for participation. Literature about social service programs and nutrition is provided in backpacks for families to review.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The program objective is to provide increased amounts of fresh produce monthly to extremely marginalized individuals and seniors, many threatened by chronic diseases like Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, stroke, and obesity. Through a generous $1 for $1 match by a collaborative of local foundations, we are able to double the funding to purchase produce. A negotiated arrangement between the California farmers and the California Association of Food Banks enables us to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables at just $0.13 per pound. Without this program's produce distributions under the auspices of our Neighborhood Distribution and Senior Food Program, nutrition-related disease and hunger would be at even greater proportions in the county. Our goal is to distribute 11 million pounds of fresh produce this fiscal year through these programs and our Food to Nonprofit Partners Program in an effort to mitigate and even reverse serious health problems.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Food Bank staff help pre-screen clients for CalFresh benefits (formerly Food Stamps) at Neighborhood Food Distributions, CSFP sites, Emergency Food Assistance Program (EFAP) sites, and elementary schools where 50% or more of the students are eligible for free or reduced-price meals. Food Bank staff help eligible clients fill out the application. Then Food Bank staff tracks applications that have been submitted to the County Office of Health and Human Services and advocates on behalf of clients throughout the application process. If benefits are denied, Food Bank staff liaisons between the client and the County and appeals the decision. Food Bank staff attends focus groups regarding CalFresh issues, and the Food Bank hosts workshops for other nonprofits on related topics, such as immigration issues.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Funded by the federal Commodity Supplemental Food Programs (CSFP), the Senior Food Program provides monthly food packages to 14,000 eligible low-income senior citizens aged 60 and over each month. The Food Bank administers the program and distributes USDA-provided food at 40 distribution sites every month throughout San Diego County. Each participant receives fresh produce and staples such as cheese, peanut butter, cereal, canned meats, and fruit juice. The packages do not provide a complete diet but are good sources of nutrients typically lacking in target population diets. Clients of the Senior Food Program may also participate in the Fresh Produce Initiative Program. Distribution sites for the Senior Program include community centers, Head Start schools, churches, senior centers, and adult care centers.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

Run in conjunction with the Food Bank's Food to Nonprofits Program, the program "rescues" soon-to-expire fresh and prepared foods from a range of food retailers, including restaurants, caterers, corporate cafeterias, and hotels, and delivers the food to local nonprofits, such as soup kitchens, homeless shelters, and churches that distribute the food immediately to people in need, often the same day. Interested nonprofits must attend a training session, review program guidelines, obtain food handler permits, and sign an agreement supplied by the Food Bank. The procedure includes these steps: 1) A registered food donor informs the Food Bank of an upcoming event where excess food may be available; 2) The Food Bank notifies its registered nonprofit partners about the potential donation; 3) The first nonprofit to respond receives rights to the donation, and the nonprofit's contact information is given to the food donor; 4) The nonprofit provides transportation for collection.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The goal of the College Hunger-Relief Program is to identify best practices of college food pantries, enhance existing college food pantries and campus-based hunger-relief programs, help colleges that would like to establish a food pantry program on campus, and to bring resources to all colleges and universities in San Diego County with food pantries and hunger-relief programs for low-income college students.

Hungry students struggle to concentrate in class and suffer academically. Since a person with a college degree or vocational certificate is less likely to slip into poverty, providing food assistance to low-income students while they are in school can help prevent students from impoverished backgrounds from dropping out of college and falling into the cycle of poverty. That is why community leaders, local colleges, and universities are partnering with the San Diego Food Bank and our North County Food Bank chapter to create safety net programs for low-income students.

Population(s) Served
Students
Young adults

The Food Bank started the Diaper Bank Program to help solve an important piece of the poverty puzzle for young parents living in poverty by giving them the hand up they need to work for their families. Diapers are expensive — a month’s supply for one child can cost between $70 and $80, and diapers cannot be purchased with CalFresh benefits or WIC. As a result, parents try to make do without diapers by stretching their supply by leaving babies in dirty diapers longer or by reusing diapers.

Our Diaper Bank Program helps by distributing diapers to families in need through our network of nonprofit partners. The goal is to provide much-needed diapers to low-income parents who reside in San Diego County so they can remain employed, provide for their families, and lift themselves out of poverty.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Parents

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 2012

Awards

4-Star Rating 2012

Charity Navigator

California Challenge Award 2012

California Awards for Performance Excellence (CAPE) Program

External assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2019)

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Pounds of fresh produce distributed per year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Fresh Produce Initiative

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Pounds of food distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals served monthly

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of elementary school children living in poverty who receive a weekend backpack full of food through our Food 4 Kids Backpack Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Food 4 Kids Backpack Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goals of the Jacobs & Cushman San Diego Food Bank are to:

-Provide nutritious food for people in need
-Advocate for the hungry
-Educate the community about hunger

1. Provide nutritious food for people in need:

-Food Procurement: We work with a wide range of manufacturers, retailers, producers and growers to get food donated; we work with food sources to purchase food in bulk at very low prices; We engage the community in food drives throughout the year;

-Distribution: We partner with other non-profits to distribute food: In addition to our own 200+ distributions across San Diego County each month, we provide food to 500 nonprofit partners (soup kitchens, shelters, meal programs, food pantries) who are feeding people in their local neighborhoods; We work closely with our nonprofit partners, helping them build their capacity (we provide consultation, education and training, as well as pass-through grants)

-Community Partnerships: We collaborate with many organizations, foundations, businesses and other non-profits to ensure we are working as efficiently and effectively to address the issues that impact hunger and malnutrition, and the broader problem of poverty.

-Development: We continuously engage our donors (individual, corporate, organizational and foundation), building ongoing support that allows us feed more people

2. Advocate for the hungry:

-Food Bank staff actively engage with local, state and federal officials on issues that impact food security

-Food Bank staff are leaders on local and regional collaborations addressing poverty, nutrition and hunger

3. Educate the community about hunger:

-Presentations to civic organizations, fraternal organizations, companies, faith communities and schools build awareness of the issue of hunger in the San Diego community, and call the community into action

-Individuals and groups are invited to tour the 90,000 square foot warehouse and learn more about the important mission first-hand

-The media is engaged to provide multi-channel education to the public

-The Food Bank Leadership Council is a team of volunteers who are actively engaged in sharing the Food Bank mission at events throughout the community

The San Diego Food Bank staff is a team of passionate, educated leaders, skilled at collaborating and finding innovative ways to address issues - from logistics to community engagement, from advocacy to development, and everything in between. The Board of Directors is extremely engaged, bringing in resources and providing oversight and strategic planning to assist in all aspects of the mission.

-We acquired the North County Food Bank in October 2015, and have doubled our footprint in that region - getting a larger amount of food to twice as many people through more than twice as many nonprofit partners. The support of the local North County communities is tremendous.

-We've increased the number of elementary school children receiving backpacks of nutritious food every Friday during the school year through our Food 4 Kids Backpack Program - we now distribute to 3,300 children at more than 40 schools in 11 San Diego County districts.

-We've increased the amount of healthy food we're distributing. With a true focus on nutrition, we no longer distribute candy, soda, sports drinks or juice drinks that aren't 100% fruit juice. All foods distributed are graded based on their nutritional value on a scale of 1-3, with 1 being the most nutritious. We educate our nonprofit partners to help them choose the most nutritious options for their local distributions. Approximately 75% of food distributed last year was ranked a 1 or 2.

-Our overhead is just 8%, so every dollar donated provides 5 meals to hungry San Diegans. How do we do it? We have innovative practices in place provided by donors including solar panels on our roof (saves $10,000/month on electricity = 600,000 meals/year); our state-of-the-art recycling & compost center (saves $25,000/year = 125,000 meals/year); our volunteer corps works diligently 6 days/week - last year, their help saved us approximately $1.5 million in labor costs; and more.

What haven't we accomplished? We haven't put an end to hunger in San Diego County…yet.

Financials

Jacobs & Cushman San Diego Food Bank
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Jacobs & Cushman San Diego Food Bank

Board of directors
as of 7/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Steve Bernstein


Board co-chair

Mr. Steve Bernstein

Wells Fargo

Term: 2020 - 2024

Steve Bernstein

Wells Fargo

David Bejarano

Chula Vista Police, retired

Bob Bolinger

Entercom San Diego

Harvey Berger

Pope, Berger & Williams, LLP

Ed McGuire

San Diego Chargers

Anthony Schwarz

Qualcomm Technologies

Steve Rowles

Morrison & Foerster

Corrine Brindley

Sea World Parks and Entertainment

Sergio Del Prado

San Diego Padres

Jane Finley

Kaiser Permanente

Elizabeth Fitzsimons

San Diego Regional Chamber

Ahmed Haque

NRG Energy, Inc.

Scott Heath

Fox 5 San Diego

Chris Henn

Wawanesa Insurance

Mihir Parikh

NVisionscenters

Dana Alligood

Bank of America Merrill Lynch

Melissa Forrest

iHeart Media

Ray Patel

Thermo Fisher Scientific, Retired

Darrell Pilant

Harrah's Resort Southern California

John Wicker

San Diego State University

Sheldon Derezin

Waxie Sanity Supply

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/2/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data