Youth Development

Artists Striving To End Poverty

Giving children access to the power of the arts, regardless of their backgrounds

aka ASTEP

New York, NY

Mission

Artists Striving To End Poverty (ASTEP) was conceived by Broadway Musical Director Mary-Mitchell Campbell and Juilliard students to transform the lives of youth using the most powerful tool they had—their art. Today, ASTEP connects performing and visual artists with underserved youth in the U.S. and around the world to awaken their imaginations, foster critical thinking, and help them break the cycle of poverty.

Notes from the Nonprofit

OUR BELIEFS We define poverty as a lack of choice. The right to choose is a fundamental human right, and we strive to end the poverty that robs us of that humanity. The performing and visual arts create a unique safe space to rediscover choice. WHY THE ARTS? Access to the arts is essential to a child's personal and academic success. They become better communicators, build their confidence to participate, and learn how to solve problems by thinking outside the box. Most importantly, the arts show each child that their voice is important. There is infinite possibility in that belief. HOW? We partner with schools and community organizations. Through after-school and summer programs, we serve vulnerable populations: youth affected by immigration status, homelessness, gun-violence, incarceration, the justice system, HIV/AIDS, systemic poverty, and the caste system, and we craft a variety of unique program models that best fit the needs of our partner’s student population.

Ruling Year

2006

Founder and Co-Executive Director

Mary-Mitchell Campbell

Co-Executive Director

Davinia Troughton

Main Address

165 West 46th Street Suite 1303

New York, NY 10036 USA

Keywords

Art Classes, Art Workshops, Children, Youth, Youth Development, Broadway, Juilliard, performing artists, visual artists, youth development, arts, academic achievement, social development, Refugee Youth, Ecuador, Florida, South Africa, HIV/AIDS, Poverty, New York City, Volunteers, Artists, India, Arts Education, Summer Camp, Dance, Music, Drama, Visual Art, Immigrants, Migrant Farm Workers, India, Bangalore, Theatre, volunteer, volunteer artists, broadway, HIV/AIDS, social emotional skills, incarceration, justice system, homelessness, unaccompanied minors, alternatives to detention

EIN

20-4532991

 Number

3323198881

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Voluntarism Promotion (T40)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

Studies show that involvement in the arts is linked to higher academic performance, increased test scores, more community service, and lower dropouts. Significantly, dropout rates for students with low socio-economic backgrounds and low arts involvement is at an alarming 22%, however, dropout rates for students with low socio-economic backgrounds but have high arts involvement is only 4%. In addition, ASTEP believes that the arts can build strong communities through activities that promote community development cultural awareness. Yet despite these clear benefits, children increasingly do not have access to arts education. The decline of arts education is most drastic in underserved populations, where students who could benefit the most from arts education are getting it the least. By providing access to the arts in communities that lack this vital resource, ASTEP provides an essential, missing component to youth development. ASTEP's quality arts education programs are critical for he

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Art-in-Action Summer Camp

Arts at Shanti Bhavan Children's Project

Arts at Refugee Youth Summer Academy

ASTEP on STAGE!

Arts at Incarnation Children's Center

Arts at Teach for India

ASTEP Leaders Network

artsINSIDEOUT

Where we workNew!

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of students per classroom during the reporting period

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Number of teachers recruited

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed social skills (e.g., interpersonal communication, conflict resolution)

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Arts at Shanti Bhavan Children's Project

Number of students who demonstrate the desire to succeed in the academic setting

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Immigrants, newcomers, refugees

Related program

Arts at Refugee Youth Summer Academy

Number of children achieving language and literacy proficiency

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Immigrants, newcomers, refugees

Related program

Arts at Refugee Youth Summer Academy

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

At ASTEP, we are deeply committed to empowering individuals who suffer from an absence of choice, especially children. The right to choose is a fundamental human right, and we strive to end the poverty that robs us of that humanity. The performing and visual arts create a unique safe space to rediscover choice.

We see every day how access to the arts gives children vital skills that can be used in school and in their personal lives. They become better communicators, build their confidence to participate, and learn how to solve problems by thinking outside the box. Most importantly, the arts show each child that their voice is important. There is infinite possibility in that belief.

"We're not training kids to become artists but teaching them to think like one. Using imagination and innovation to solve problems and collaborate is imperative to breaking cycles of poverty." -- Mary-Mitchell Campbell, ASTEP Founder and Executive Director

ASTEP partners with schools and community organizations that serve vulnerable populations: youth affected by immigration status, homelessness, gun-violence, incarceration, the justice system, HIV/AIDS, systemic poverty, and the caste system. We craft a variety of unique program models that best fit the needs of our partner’s student population, working collaboratively within existent structures. This approach means that we are complementing our partners’ goals, ensuring the needs of the whole child are met. Practically speaking, this means that all ASTEP programs look vastly different from one another. Through after-school workshops and summer camps, ASTEP Volunteer Artists strive to use the performing and visual arts as a vehicle for teaching students social and emotional and self-regulatory skill sets—each program achieves that mission in various ways and to varying degrees of measured success.

The quality of the artists who volunteer with ASTEP uniquely positions us among other arts education nonprofits. Our volunteers are highly successful Broadway performers, professional artists, members of professional dance and theater companies, and students and faculty from schools such as The Juilliard School. They become transformative role models in the lives of the youth we serve, combining their passion for the arts and their ability to use artistic tools to teach life skills. All of our Volunteer Artists receive training, support, and supervision from our program staff. Yet what they receive is far outweighed by what they bring: passion for their art and a level of excellence and experience that our youth are rarely exposed to. The exposure to different art forms and to these artists is both inspirational and aspirational for our youth.

ASTEP recently completed a yearlong partnership with Algorhythm, an organization that helps nonprofits learn to better quantify their metrics. Through this program, ASTEP developed a new tool to measure outcomes using pre- and post-student questionnaires and pre- and post-teacher observations. We will be using the online Youth Development iLearning System (YDiLS) through Algorhythm to administer questions and gather data that has been proven to be statistically significant. This means that because we're using a metrics system that pulls from a large data set, our evaluation tools prove that a percentage of our students experienced growth in their social and emotional skill development as a direct result of our programming. This will allow our Volunteer Teaching Artists, Program Facilitators and Director of Programs and Evaluation to gather more relevant outcomes and allow us to more accurately assess what strategies are working and where we can make improvements.

ASTEP’s ultimate goal is to provide exposure and access to quality arts education for children, regardless of their backgrounds – we have demonstrated significant success in transforming the lives of the youth we serve, as well as the lives of the artists who volunteer with us, in demonstrable, measurable ways. Our evaluation reports indicate that the youth we serve show a marked increase in their academic performance, self-confidence, and healthy lifestyle choices. Since our inception in 2006, ASTEP has sustainably built effective arts education programs by securing diverse funding sources to increase staff capacity. At this current juncture, we aim to scale up our fastest growing NYC program, ASTEP on STAGE!, in order to fulfill our ultimate goals: to serve more children in more communities, and to recruit and train more volunteer teaching artists who are the lifeblood of our programs.

External Reviews

Financials

Artists Striving To End Poverty

Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

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  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2016
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2016
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to see what's included.

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

Race & Ethnicity

Sexual Orientation

We do not display sexual orientation information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies

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We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
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We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
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We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
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We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
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We have a diversity committee in place
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We have a diversity manager in place
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We have a diversity plan
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We use other methods to support diversity