Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Central Piedmont, Inc.

Defenders of Potential

aka BBBS of the Central Piedmont   |   High Point, NC   |  www.bbbscp.org

Mission

Our Mission is to provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported 1-to-1 relationships that change their lives for the better, forever.

Ruling year info

2006

Principal Officer

Ms. Wendy Rivers

Main address

P.O. Box 627

High Point, NC 27261 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-4648395

NTEE code info

Adult, Child Matching Programs (O30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

ig Brothers Big Sisters seeks to change the lives of children facing adversity between 5 and 18 years of age. Our network of volunteers, donors and supporters comes from all walks of life, all backgrounds, all corners of our community and beyond. Our unique brand of one-to-one mentoring, in which a child facing adversity is carefully matched with a caring adult mentor in a relationship supported by professional Big Brothers Big Sisters staff members, changes lives for the better forever. Our landmark study Our impact on education is evident in research conducted by Public/Private Ventures and published in 1995. When comparing children matched with a Big Brother or Big Sister to those waiting to be served by Big Brothers Big Sisters, these researchers found that: Littles skipped half as many days of school as did their peers. Littles felt more competent about doing schoolwork. Littles skipped fewer classes than did their peers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth Programs

Big Brothers Big Sisters consists of 2 core programs: 1. Community Based - a child between the ages of 6 and 14 with a positive adult mentor to spend 1-3 hours per week together for at least one year. 2. School Based - matches youth in elementary schools with a positive mentor who may be an adult, high school student, or college student. They meet once a week during the school year for at leas an hour in the schools or in afterschool programs.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Where we work

Awards

Board of the Year 2006

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America

Affiliations & memberships

Mid Large Agecny Alliance 2017

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children who have the skills necessary to maintain personal health

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Youth Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students showing improvement in test scores

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Youth Programs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

According to Teachers Surveyed. We use improved in at least 2 or more subjects

Number of children who have a sense of their own feelings and an ability to express empathy for others

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Youth Programs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students demonstrating responsible behaviors and work habits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Youth Programs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students who demonstrate the desire to succeed in the academic setting

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Youth Programs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed positive relationships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Youth Programs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed a strong sense of self

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Youth Programs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our program goals are as follows:
100% matriculation
80% Improvement in class room behavior
80% Improvement in academics
80% will maintain on-going mentoring relationship

All of our matches will be assigned a case manager for the purposes of monthly contacts and match evaluation and support. We will use an evaluation form called, Program Outcome Evaluation (POE), which includes 21 outcome objectives for the program. They are based on the 40 developmental assets that The Search Institute says takes to raise healthy children. We have influence on 21 of those assets and they will be divided into 3 categories called confidence, competence, and caring. This evaluation will be completed by the teacher, parent and volunteer of the program participant. We will also collect report cards of program participants to measure the goal of 100% matriculation and 70% will show academic improvement and behavior improvement. Of those children 70% will show improvement in confidence, competence, and caring as well.

We have been conducting Program Outcome Evaluations for the last 14 years.

BBBS has 10 full time staff persons and 1 part-time person, whom all hold a minimum of a 4-year college degree and training in the area of case management. The CEO and VP of Programs both hold a Masters degree in business and social work respectively. All staff are trained locally as well as by Big Brothers Big Sisters of America and all must pass online training tests and attend trainings on a regular basis. Three of the staff who will be working on the Mentoring Children of Promise have all been trained in that program by federal trainers. We will then in turn train our volunteers on how to specifically work with children of an incarcerated parent.

Each year at the end of the school year we collect report cards, surveys from teachers and parents and compile them into our Report to the Community. We are collecting data and reporting each year so the process is always ongoing.

We are currently implementing College & Career Readiness Programs and are in the process of getting a building donated so we can do programming for this program and others.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve youth from primarily low income single parent households between the ages of 6-18.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We have started to match older youth with a positive mentor. We were receiving feedback from parents that they need help with youth in middle school and getting students through high school. We created a college to career readiness program for this.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Through our Parent Advisory Council we learn many new things. It helps empower our parents and gives them the opportunity to help the agency change and grow.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Central Piedmont, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Central Piedmont, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 2/26/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Cynthia Thompson

NC A&T

Term: 2019 - 2021


Board co-chair

David Leppert

PNC

Term: 2021 - 2023

Shane Stutts

Roberson, Haworth & Reece

Mark Baker

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Steve Billings

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Mike Bridger

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Chris Dudley

High Point University

Ken Esposito

High Point Bank

Shane Graham

Piedmont Partners, LLC

David Smith

Smith & Jennings

Eliott Williams

Carolina Anesthesiology

Wendy Rivers

Big Brothers Big Sisters

Leah Price

BB&T

Ray Shufelt

Spider Digital

Peggy Shufelt

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Margaret Thompson

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Sandra Hayes Dunn

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Bill Distler

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Richard Worden

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Chris Barbee

Oppenheimer & Co.

Carrie Bailey

BB&T

Michael Pittman

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Pat Shewcow

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Michael Sileno

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Cynthia Carlton Thompson

Retired Professor

Toby Akers

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Carrie Bailey

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Kristen Dailey

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Bryan Chapman

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Melody Emerson

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Brandon Hedrick

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Lise' McLaughlin

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Candace Tucker

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Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/26/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Native American/Cacuasian
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/26/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.