Youth Development

Youth Achievers USA Institute

I believe I can achieve whatever I believe I can achieve.

aka YouthUSA   |   Kennesaw, GA   |  www.YouthUSA.net

Mission

The mission of YouthUSA is to build capacity around American youth, ages 7-24, empowering them to believe and achieve their Spiritual, Physical, Social, Financial, Educational, Professional and Recreational goals. YouthUSA values each seven part "vision of the future" as a "Money-n-the-Bank" Community Asset.

Notes from the nonprofit

YouthUSA is ready, willing and able to partner with other charitable organizations, ministries, agencies and businesses for the benefit of youth and young adults, ages 7-24. Our top priority for the remainder of our current 10-year strategic plan is to engage our community, the YouthUSA Corporate Village in supporting Goal 1 (NO POVERTY) of 17 goals toward sustainable development. By qualifying any American youth with Money-n-the-Bank, and economically including each of them as beneficiaries, We The People will achieve NO POVERTY through an emerging generation of Americans. JOIN US at www.YouthUSA.net

Ruling year info

2007

Chief Executive Officer

Mrs. Stephanie A. Walker Stradford

Chief Information Officer

Mr. Eric Stradford

Main address

c/o TheEnterpriZe 1300 Ridenour Blvd NW, Suite 100

Kennesaw, GA 30152 USA

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EIN

20-4945833

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Management & Technical Assistance (W02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Economic inclusion is a term used by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) describing a variety of public and private efforts to bring underserved consumers into the financial mainstream. According to the FDIC, a significant number of people in the U.S. have little or no current relationship with a financial institution. YouthUSA seeks to counter security threats to economically disadvantaged American youth by qualifying them as community assets and including them as economic beneficiaries. YouthUSA achieves economic inclusion through LEARN-2-EARN activities such as "Money-n-the-Bank" economic goal setting, "Whole Village" circular capacity building and value-added asset building through Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

THE ANNUAL YOUTH ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS

THE ANNUAL YOUTH ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS supports the YouthUSA mission with online capacity building. Funding provided administrative and technical consultation to design and sustain the on-line application which results in caring adult capacity around qualifying youth applicants. Program expenses maintain interactive web forms, secure collaboration software, travel and lodging to provide technical assistance for qualifying beneficiaries. In 2013 the program qualified one new beneficiary and provided technical assistance to five existing beneficiaries to include Sir Charles Hill, Etoy Ridgnal, Elana Williams-Jenkins, Robert Selders, Mariasonniah Smith and Yvonne Griswold-McNeil. Technical assistance includes advisement of opportunities as a YouthUSA beneficiary. Our deadline for entry each year is April 15th.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Interfaith groups
Budget
$48,000

This development program supports grant-making through  qualifying youth beneficiaries.  The fund honors holistic human investment by Americans such as J.D. and Laurena Walker of Philadelphia. These "ordinary” people left a legacy of self help, self improvement, collective faith, work and service from which THE ANNUAL YOUTH ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS program evolved.  The development fund, established by Evelyn Walker Armstrong, daughter of J.D. and Laurena Walker, supports a $5 million financial goal for annual funding and management of YouthUSA Fellowships.  A YouthUSA Fellowship defines a financial foundation (Individual Development Account) for a beneficiary’s learning, housing, and economic sustainability.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Interfaith groups
Budget
$256,000

The YouthUSA news and information program creates learning opportunities in media arts.  The service integrates produced informative videos from seven feeder channels, informative feature articles and photographs in an interactive, internet blog format.  The service provides beneficiaries and stakeholders with interactive tools for presenting ideas and opportunities for consideration by the YouthUSA Board of Directors.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Interfaith groups
Budget
$48,000

The YouthUSA Endowment Strategy promotes revenue generating small business activity to augment charitable development under the J.D. and Laurena Walker Fund.  Social Enterprise hosts  subscribing community entrepreneurs at THE CONFERENCE CENTER Presentations are developed by a Social Enterprise Task Force in the virtual online meeting place, THE CONFERENCE CENTER.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Interfaith groups
Budget
$48,000

Where we work

Awards

Drum Major Award 2011

Cobb County Southern Christian Leadership Conference

MoneySmart Partner 2007

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation FDIC

Woman of the Year 2016

YWCA

Certificate of Appreciation 2018

St Jude's Hospital

Recognition 2017

MLK Celebration Committee

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of organizations applying for grants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth,Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related Program

The J.D. and Laurena Walker Fund

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Qualifying groups are 501c3 public charities identified through YouthUSA beneficiary applications. Capacity building of 20 caring adults per beneficiary represents the non-cash benefit to applicants.

Average number of non-monetary support contacts per grantee

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent

Related Program

THE ANNUAL YOUTH ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Six economic beneficiaries received non-monetary support to participate in community programs where they live, learn or worship.

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents (13-19 years),At-risk youth,Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related Program

THE ANNUAL YOUTH ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Dollar$hip Ring is a $1.00 award to an individual youth or homeless person. It promotes values-based learning based on the national motto, "In God We Trust."

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Our overarching goal is to increase the value of American children, particularly children in historically disadvantaged families categorized and valued as "minorities." An intentional, pro-social goal to increase the net worth of American children in 100 low income families to $50,000 over a 10 year period. ($5,000,000) presents an opportunity for evaluating a myriad of related threats in the American homeland. Research is clear that poverty is the single greatest threat to children's well-being.<br/>The J.D. and Laurena Walker Fund approaches this economic security threat from a community reinvestment perspective. The poor can stop being poor if the rich are willing to become richer at a slower pace. The development program establishes an accessible grant-making source to aid low income Americans in addressing local community needs. According to the National Center for Children in Poverty, more than 16 million children in the United States - 22% of all children - live in families with incomes below the federal poverty level - $23,550 a year for a family of four. Children under 18 years represent 23 percent of the population, but they comprise 33 percent of all people in poverty. Among all children, 44 percent live in low-income families and approximately one in every five (22 percent) live in poor families. Being a child in a low-income or poor family does not happen by chance. Parental education and employment, race/ethnicity, and other factors are associated with children experiencing economic insecurity. Most of these children have parents who work, but low wages and unstable employment leave their families struggling to make ends meet. Poverty can impede children's ability to learn and contribute to social, emotional, and behavioral problems. Poverty also can contribute to poor health and mental health. Risks are greatest for children who experience poverty when they are young and/or experience deep and persistent poverty.

YouthUSA promotes increased knowledge of financial responsibility among caring adult stakeholders through financial literacy. We offer an easily accessible online version of FDIC Money-Smart Financial Literacy. Our youth beneficiaries are encouraged to engage caring adults in completing the financial literacy training. A financial incentives modeled from Individual Development Accounts promote saving as a new social norm for economically disadvantaged citizens. Increased investment in youth through intentional, prosocial economic development presents ways and means for modeling replicable grassroots community reinvestment..

YouthUSA has established itself as an economic beneficiary with existing assets to implement its vision for asset building among disadvantaged Americans. Our proprietary capacity building program, THE ANNUAL YOUTH ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS connects 20 caring adults to one American youth age 7-24. Partnerships with FDIC to deliver financial literacy and with Microsoft to connect disadvantaged Americans with access to opportunities in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math promote a unique model for engaging low income citizens in grassroots community reinvestment.

The total number of qualifying youth beneficiaries (100).<br/>The total percentage of caring adults to complete FDIC Financial Literacy (2000 caring adults = 100%)<br/>Increase in investments through a $5 million development program (J.D. and Laurena Walker Fund).<br/>Increase in reinvestment through Beneficiary savings (YouthUSA Fellowship).

Since 9-11-2006, YouthUSA has provided corporate support to a network of beneficiaries. Since 1996, 92 of 100 beneficiaries have been qualified through THE ANNUAL YOUTH ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS, a proprietary circular capacity building program. Each beneficiary qualifies a "whole village" of 20 caring adults for philanthropic support available to YouthUSA. The charity currently addresses poverty issues through shared work and responsibility, threats to economic security through intentional. pro-social community re-investment, and holistic achievement through self-actualization. Since 2008, the charity has generated nearly Youtube 50,000 video views, published more than 50 youth-related news articles, produced and aired 23 radio programs and provided capacity-building assistance in Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Pennsylvania, Louisiana and Ohio.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: community meetings/town halls.

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: it is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection.

  • What significant change resulted from feedback

    The YouthUSA Corporate Village models economic inclusion as defined by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). We promote FDIC Money Smart Financial Literacy, and provide opportunities for community members to LEARN-2-EARN using FDIC Money Smart for Small Business (MSSB) curriculum. Online quarterly meetings provide regularly scheduled forums for officers and elected directors to hear from any beneficiary or caring adult stakeholder of YouthUSA. In 2017, inspired by an international call to end poverty, and unanimous consent to support #ENVISION2030, the top corporate priority for YouthUSA is to end poverty by 2030. Our method is to promote YouthUSA Money-n-the-Bank as an inherited value for any American.

Financials

Youth Achievers USA Institute
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Youth Achievers USA Institute

Board of directors
as of 6/9/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Stephanie A. Walker Stradford

Youth Achievers USA Institute

Term: 2012 - 2020

Evelyn Armstrong

Merck & Co. (Retired/Deceased 1-10-15)

Eric Stradford

Veteran, U.S. Armed Forces

Stephanie Stradford

YouthUSA CEO

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Keywords

Mentoring, Youth Development, Children, Capacity Building, Financial Literacy, Community Improvement, Goal Setting, Small Business Development, Family Values, High School Dropout, America's Promise, FDIC, scholarships, fellowships, economic, internships