Access Youth Academy

Potential Made Powerful

San Diego, CA   |  http://www.accessyouthacademy.org

Mission

We believe every child should have equal access to achieve their full potential. Access Youth Academy’s mission is to transform the lives of underserved youth through academic enrichment, health and wellness, social responsibility, and leadership development using the sport of squash as a catalyst.

Ruling year info

2006

Executive Director

Mr. Renato Paiva

Main address

704 Euclid Ave.

San Diego, CA 92114 USA

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Formerly known as

Surf City Squash

EIN

20-5119659

NTEE code info

Other Youth Development N.E.C. (O99)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Tennis and Racquet Sports Clubs/Leagues (N66)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Access Youth Academy works to level the playing field for all students, closing the economic disparity by providing access to higher education for low-income students in San Diego County. Through academic mentoring and athletic training in the sport of squash, our students gain skills needed to succeed in high school, college, and beyond. Additionally, success in a prestige sport such as squash has propelled our students, from some of San Diego's most underserved areas, to matriculate in and earn degrees from elite schools throughout the nation.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Access Youth Academy

Access Youth Academy is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization committed to transform the lives of underserved youth. Access was founded in 2006 by Greg Scherman and Chris Walker, who believed the San Diego community could benefit from an urban squash program that provided opportunity and support unlike any other non-profit in the region.

We use the sport of squash as a catalyst to transform young lives. By building on our highly successful Preuss pilot program and in partnership with Southeast San Diego area schools, we will implement our successful program that begins by selecting children in the 7th grade, educating them with our four pillars and continuing to transform their lives for six years through high school graduation and then 6 years through college and post-graduate into our Southeast San Diego expansion plan.

During these fundamental years, we provide guidance for building essential life skills to becoming responsible and honorable adults. By creating a culture of healthy lifestyle and exercise, students find the discipline and dedication to unlock their potential and achieve their goals. Family members are involved in the transformation process, as these skills translate to all members of a family and ultimately a community.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students showing improvement in test scores

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Young adults, At-risk youth, Low-income people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Access Youth Academy is committed to ensuring student success throughout high school and that each student earns a college degree, receiving the greatest amount of scholarship and financial aid possible.

Access Youth Academy goals are to: Teach students to take responsibility for their actions and choices; Help appreciate and enjoy physical activity; Develop students sense of good sportsmanship on off the squash court; Promote understanding and friendship between people of different backgrounds; Engage students in service projects that help their community. Improve their GPA to 3.8 or higher; Participate in and win more national squash tournaments; Arrange and attend at least 12 community service projects per year.

During these fundamental years, we provide guidance for building essential life skills to becoming responsible and honorable adults. By creating a culture of healthy lifestyle and exercise, students find the discipline and dedication to unlock their potential and achieve their goals.

For 15 years, Access program enrollment has been limited due to space constraints. Now, after more than ten years of planning and with a comprehensive multi-year funding model in place that includes a combination of earned revenue and philanthropy, Access is well-positioned for significant program expansion.

Since opening our new community center in June 2021, Access has created partnerships with 13 new schools and several community organizations. In 2021, our student population increased by 250% over previous years.

Continued growth in our new location will allow Access to reach hundreds to thousands more at-risk youths, serve more first-generation college students, and work with local schools to enhance existing physical education classes.

Over 15 years, Access students have achieved a 100% high-school graduation rate, a 100% college acceptance rate, earned over $9.7 million in scholarship money, and won 13 national squash championships. They have attended leading colleges and universities, including Princeton, Dartmouth, Columbia, Penn, UCLA, and UCSD. Seven students have attended UC Berkeley.

Beginning with the opening of the new community center in June 2021, Access has an innovative expansion of its financial model. In addition to the programs for underserved youth described above, funded by philanthropy, we have developed a series of revenue-producing programs. During FY21/22, earned revenue will account for 25% of our total budget. This total is projected to increase in subsequent years.

With our new state-of-the-art facility located in a federally designated Promise Zone south of Route 8, we have the will and commitment to take our program to scale. We are an incubator of a proven idea and want to reach as many youths as possible.

Financials

Access Youth Academy
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Access Youth Academy

Board of directors
as of 09/20/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Blair Sadler

Blair Sadler

Rady Children's Hospital

Henry Manice

Mighty Squirrel

Kim Kamdar

Domain Associates

Greg Scherman

Sherman Energy Group

Hugh Davies

Director Emeritus, Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego

Jack McGrory

La Jolla MJ Management, LLC

Robert Merritt

Retired

Kevin Munkholm

Marsh & McLennan Companies

Zachary Smith

Rady School of Management, UCSD

Mary Walshok

Dean, UCSD Extension

Joshua Swigart

Swigart Law Group

Susan Taylor

Scripps Health

Emily Mortimer

Cord Blood Register

Julie Visser

The Toft Group

Fernanda Coelho

Coelho Consulting

Ana Rodriguez

Access Student Representative

Kebenesh Genna

Access Parent Representative

Kevin Smith

Wood, Smith, Henning, and Berman

Laurie Black

LJ Black Consulting

Jack Bergman

Allied Business Netowrk

David Galluccio

Wells Fargo

John Lingos-Webb

Duetto

Susie Nancarrow

Nacarrow Realty Group

Renato Paiva

Access Youth Academy, Executive Director

Jessica Sethi

Sethi Management

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/7/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/07/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.