GOLD2021

Foundation of H.O.P.E.

aka no   |   Pittsburgh, PA   |  www.foundationofhope.org

Mission

“Empowering people impacted by the criminal justice system to renew their faith, rebuild their lives, and restore positive relationships”

Ruling year info

2006

Executive Director

Mr. Jody Raeford

Main address

540 Suismon Street

Pittsburgh, PA 15212 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-5218569

NTEE code info

Religion Related, Spiritual Development N.E.C. (X99)

Citizen Participation (W24)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Foundation of HOPE programs reduce recidivism by offering the opportunity for vital spiritual and emotional support. We focus in the following areas:
Addiction and Recovery
Anger Management
Confronting “Stinking Thinking"
Life Skills
Parenting
Release and Reintegration
Faith
Mentoring

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Chaplaincy Program

The HOPE Chaplaincy Program provides pastoral care, charity, worship, religious education, religious programming, and other support services for inmates of all faiths in the Allegheny County Jail. Faith groups receiving services include, but are not limited to: Protestants, Catholics, Muslims, Jehovah's Witnesses, Jews, Buddhists, and Native Americans. The program receives up to 2,500 requests per month for Bibles and other scriptures, visitation, care packages for indigent inmates, reading glasses, spiritual reading material, and other resources. Our volunteer and paid chaplains visit inmates on all pods, offering the opportunity for vital spiritual and emotional support. The Chaplain's Office oversees 27 worship services and 39 scripture/catechism studies per week for inmates of a variety of faiths including those in mental health and disciplinary units. Volunteers for the HOPE Chaplaincy Program contribute more than 11,000 volunteer hours per year.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

The HOPE Pre-Release program is an interfaith, faith-based, rehabilitative program for male and female inmates which works in collaboration with key community service providers and volunteers to empower incarcerated individuals to transform their thinking and behaviors, while preparing for their future.

Over the course of the program, HOPE Pre-Release participants meet for over 120 hours of group work, requiring full participation and the passing of a final exam. The participants live together on designated housing units and address the following key themes:

Addiction and Recovery
Anger Management
Confronting “Stinking Thinking”
Life Skills
Parenting
Release and Reintegration
Spiritual Formation

HOPE Pre-Release Core Values Include:
Respect: We expect participants to care about themselves and others
Responsibility: We expect participants to do what they are supposed to
Integrity: We expect participants to be who they say they are
Productivity: We expect participants to work hard
Perseverance: We expect participants to make positive choices again and again, and wait with hope

HOPE Participants Must:
Actively participate in all sessions of the program
Complete reading and written homework assignments when due
Invest themselves in establishing a relationship of trust and honesty with a mentor if desired
Welcome HOPE to challenge them to grow in their understanding of themselves and their choices
Be open and respectful of all instructors and participants’ faith beliefs and backgrounds

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

The HOPE Aftercare Program is an interfaith pre- and post-release adult reintegration program for inmates and ex-offenders that seeks to ensure the successful reintegration of former inmates back into the community. HOPE Aftercare assists ex-offenders with accessing available resources for employment, housing, education, food assistance, mental health services, and clothing. We also help ex-offenders with obtaining identification and accessing medical assistance. Weekly support groups are open to all ex-offenders and their supporters. Ex-offenders can be matched with mentors who assist them in reintegration on a one-on-one basis. The Aftercare mentoring program matches ex-offenders with mentors who can assist in reintegration. Once trained, mentors agree to maintain a professional mentoring relationship with their mentees by visiting them in jail at least twice a month and maintaining the match for at least one year. Upon release, mentors and mentees are expected to meet weekly. Continuing education classes on topics such as eco-maps, criminal and addictive thinking patterns, and boundaries provide mentors with the tools necessary to assist their mentees more effectively. Located on the North Side of Pittsburgh, our Aftercare office provides ex-offenders informational resources, referrals, and guidance regarding employment, housing programs, and other services. Our support groups provide a forum for ex-offenders to share resources, network, and address social, intellectual, vocation, spiritual, emotional, environmental, and physical needs. For 2010-2012, our Aftercare Program achieved an astounding recidivism rate of 9.5%. HOPE strives to continually evaluate and enhance its programming to increase its effectiveness.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

The HOPE Diversion Program serves youths ages 12 to 26 who reside or commit an offense in or near targeted communities throughout the city of Pittsburgh. By partnering with local law enforcement, juvenile probation, Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh, the District Attorney's Office, and other community stakeholders, the HOPE Diversion Program serves as an alternative to prosecution for eligible participants. Participants have an opportunity to engage in services provided by community-based organizations including housing assistance; mental health counseling; drug and alcohol counseling; grief counseling; job readiness; after school programming; homelessness services; community service; support groups

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

The HOPE Adult Diversion Program addresses and supports the mental, social, and physical health of individuals who, under typical circumstances, would be prosecuted in the criminal justice system.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Foundation of HOPE addresses the problem of recidivism by offering inmates support and direction both during their incarceration and after their release. Increased capacity to make responsible decisions helps avoid repeat offenses. Since 2002, HOPE has been providing a continuum of care through chaplaincy, pre-release, and aftercare services.

The Foundation of HOPE has over 450 volunteers and utilizes community-based providers that support evidence based, outcome-oriented programs and trauma informed care that results in personal and career development and good citizenship saving tax payer funds and strengthening the community.

We hire passionate and competent team members. Many of our staff volunteered at HOPE before they were hired. ALL of our staff love their positions and what they do. Our communication is not TOP down. All staff opinions are valued therefore all staff put our clients first.

The Foundation of HOPE Diversion Program was announced as the 2018 winner of the county-level (Allegheny) JCJC Community-Based Program of the Year(Juvenile Court Judges' Commission and the Awards Committee of the PA Council of Chief Juvenile Probation Officers).


Continuous Improvement of processes through best practices and continuing education. We are also striving to be the place to work.
Minimize employee turnover through healthy organizational culture and team leadership.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We now offer incentives for youth to engage in virtual learning. Our parents were having a difficult time getting youth to sign in for virtual classrooms during the COVID pandemic. The incentives made a difference.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Foundation of H.O.P.E.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Foundation of H.O.P.E.

Board of directors
as of 12/31/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rev. Dr. Ronald Peters

Daniel Kunz

Ronald Peters

Liddy Barlow

Rikell Ford

Paul Abernathy

Lynne Chadwick

Joseph Myers

Leah Nowicki

John Buckley

Laurie DuChateau

Jay Gilmer

Jody Raeford

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/15/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/15/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.