PLATINUM2024

DAKIN PIONEER VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY, INC.

aka Dakin Humane Society   |   Springfield, MA   |  www.dakinhumane.org

Mission

Dakin Humane Society delivers effective, innovative services that improve the lives of animals in need and the people who care about them.

Ruling year info

2007

Executive Director

Ms. Megan Talbert

Main address

PO Box 6307

Springfield, MA 01101 USA

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Formerly known as

Dakin Animal Shelter

Pioneer Valley Humane Society

Friends of Amherst Stray Animals, Inc.

Greenfield Area Animal Shelter

EIN

20-5318898

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Veterinary Services (D40)

Other Services (D60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Dakin Humane Society exists to improve the lives of animals in need and the people who care about them by delivering innovative and effective services that enhance the human/animal bond ultimately increasing wellness for both, keeping them together, and creating a more humane community.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adoption Program and In-House Animal Care

Dakin places lost, abandoned, and displaced companion animals each year. The goal of our adoption program is to find a permanent and loving home for each animal in need, and to provide a clean, healthy, happy environment for the animals while they wait for placement. While at Dakin, animals receive routine medical care, such as vaccinations, microchipping, and sterilization surgery. Well-trained animal resource counselors and an effectively designed open adoption process enable staff to place animals into homes that best meet their individual needs. Once animals have been placed into their new homes, Dakin adoption staff remains available to adoptive families for counseling and referral services, fielding questions from more than 5,000 callers each year.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Dakin works with community volunteers to care for and rehabilitate orphaned, injured, and unsocialized animals that have been surrendered to the adoption center and are not immediately ready for adoption. Dakin arranges foster care for more than 25% of the animals in our care. Dakin supplies the medical treatment for foster animals while foster parents love and feed the animals in their care. Many of our foster parents specialize in bottle-feeding orphans, hosting mother cats with their litters, or socializing feral kittens.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

In October 2009 Dakin opened the first Humane Alliance-model high-volume, low-cost, high-quality spay/neuter clinic in Massachusetts. The clinic is located at our Springfield Animal Resource Center and serves animals within a 90-mile radius. The clinic’s services target specific populations of animals, including the cats of low-income community members, free-roaming and feral cats, and pit bull dogs, and it also sterilizes all animals in Dakin adoption centers. In addition, the clinic staff works to serve local animal control agencies and other animal rescues by providing low-cost sterilization for the animals in their adoption programs.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Dakin's Pet Food Aid Program (PFAP) has been providing pet food to families in need since 2004. We work in collaboration with human food banks in distributing much-needed dog and cat food to the people of western MA's Pioneer Valley and beyond. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, approximately 25-28,000 pounds of pet food were distributed annually through the PFAP. By the end of 2020, more than 85,000 pounds of pet food had been given out, which resulted in more than 750,000 pet meals in that one year.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

The Pet Health Center is a non-emergency veterinary resource operated by Dakin Humane Society for pet cats and dogs. This program is an expansion of our existing veterinary services to better support the pets and people in our community and lessen the number of barriers to veterinary medical care.

We cannot help pets in need without also providing accessible resources for the people who care about them. We believe in reaching pets before they are in crisis and treatment becomes too expensive. We provide compassionate veterinary care to pets while giving their people access to payment options that keep families together.

The role of Dakin Humane Society in our community is not solely to provide adoption services but to deliver resources that improve the lives of animals and people. The Pet Health Center is just one of many supportive services that Dakin operates to keep pets and people where they belong - together.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Adoption Program and In-House Animal Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Community Spay/Neuter Clinic

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We're working to help create a world where services that support the human-animal bond are accessible to all and companion animals are no longer vulnerable.

On track with our vision, Dakin continues to care for animals both inside and outside our Animal Resource Center. Internally, In 2022, we opened the Dakin Pet Health Center, a non-emergency veterinary resource for pet cats and dogs. This program is an expansion of our existing veterinary services to better support the pets and people in our community and lessen the number of barriers to veterinary medical care. As more medically-and behaviorally-challenged animals are relinquished to our care, our PAWS (Program for Animal Wellness) Program maps out a plan for their success. Experienced medical teams use a patient-centric, individualized approach to treat these animals, with adoption being the end goal. We also have a robust foster care program that cares for hundreds of animals per year. Outside our walls, more than 42,000 animals live below the poverty line in our region. Dakin’s Pet Food Aid Program provides free pet food to those struggling. To offer accessible and affordable pet care, we present both a vaccine clinic and Clinic PLUS. These are community programs created to keep people and pets together and more importantly, keep pets out of the shelter whenever possible. Our programs enhance their level of comfort and reduce suffering. Dakin participates in life-saving transports by welcoming animals from overcrowded shelters in other areas of the county, and recently launched the Kitten Stream Team, a volunteer-based program which responds to reports of feral cat colonies, then performs humane trap/neuter/return methods to prevent colony breeding. Kittens less than 10 weeks of age are designated for adoption. In a typical year, we provide services for more than 20,000 animals and people.

Dakin currently operates an Animal Resource Center in Springfield, which is also home to our Community Spay/Neuter Clinic and our Pet Health Center. With nearly 50 paid staff (including 3 veterinarians) and several hundred volunteers, Dakin reaches communities throughout western Massachusetts and into central Massachusetts and northern Connecticut. Our volunteer team is incredibly important in helping us find successful outcomes in many of our program endeavors. In 2021 alone they contributed more than 49,000 hours of work.

Dakin Humane Society has been an invaluable resource for animals and people throughout the Pioneer Valley of western Massachusetts and beyond for over 50 years.

During this time, we have worked with our community to accomplish great things for animals. In 2022 we opened the Dakin Pet Health Center, a non-emergency veterinary resource for pet cats and dogs. This program is an expansion of our existing veterinary services to better support the pets and people in our community. More than 100,000 cats, dogs and rabbits have been treated at Dakin's Community Spay/Neuter Clinic in Springfield. Our clinic is modeled after the nationally recognized ASPCA Spay/Neuter Alliance program, and our fees are affordable thanks to grants and support from the public.

2020 was a record-breaking year for our Pet Food Aid Program. Previously, in an average year, between 25,000-28,000 pounds of pet food was distributed to people facing food insecurity. During 2020, Dakin provided over 138,000 pounds of pet food, nearly five times the typical amount needed. That resulted in over 1.2 million meals.
Our Vaccine Clinic, temporarily suspended for a few weeks in 2020, still saw over 1,700 visitors by year’s end, more than any other year in which it ran uninterrupted.

Previously, in a typical year, about 25% of all animals need foster care, and Dakin’s foster volunteers step up admirably to help these animals with guidance from our medical team. In 2021 that percentage nearly doubled.

There has been an undeniable shift in the population of animals brought to Dakin, and most shelters in the northeast. Young, healthy and easily-adoptable pets are far fewer in number, with medically- or behaviorally-challenged animals, many of them adult or senior in age, being brought in more often. Since 2018 we have found homes for 9,876 pets, about 60% of whom had medical and/or behavioral complications that were treated during their time in-shelter through Dakin’s PAWS (Program for Animal Wellness) program.

Our Executive Director, Carmine DiCenso, has become one of the county’s leading figures in animal welfare and has presented at a number of conferences. He serves as a board member for the Association for Animal Welfare Advancement, a national organization dedicated to tackling various challenges facing the animal welfare industry.

Given the constraints of living in a pandemic-affected world, we have developed a deeper appreciation of the unwavering loyalty that exists in the human/animal bond. We shared – and listened to - stories from members of our community about how their animals lifted their spirits, and how they remained by their side during confinement. What we heard about – and especially what we experienced firsthand - only served to strengthen our commitment to preserving that bond in every way possible. Our work is dedicated to transforming the lives of animals and the people who love them. Please visit dakinhumane.org to learn more.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

DAKIN PIONEER VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY, INC.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

DAKIN PIONEER VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY, INC.

Board of directors
as of 01/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Tiffany Appleton

President

Term: 2022 - 2024


Board co-chair

Rachel Slosek-Couture

Vice President

Term: 2022 - 2024

Jennifer Yergeau

Tracy Sicbaldi

Joe Lopez

Scott Berg

Kelley Moloney

Alison Spafford

Robert Cestola

Nancy Weld

Lindsay Manning

Kendra O'Neill

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/15/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/15/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.