PLATINUM2024

Salt Lake American

Helping those who need our help the most!

aka Salt Lake American Muslim, Salaam   |   Salt Lake City, UT   |  SaltLakeAmerican.org

Mission

Vision Helping those who need our help the most - refugees who do not know English nor their way around our system and celebrating cultural diversity.

Notes from the nonprofit

We are a small organization without any full-time or part-time paid employees. All board of directors and executive director duties are performed on a unpaid voluntary basis. Predicable dedicated direct services (90% of all work done) that require compensation for performance are paid a nominal fixed amount on a 1099 independent contractor basis.

Ruling year info

2007

Executive Director

Mr. Ghulam Hur Hasnain

Member Board of Directors

Mr. Ali Akbar Hasnain

Main address

1151 S Redwood Rd, Unit 102

Salt Lake City, UT 84104 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-5361935

NTEE code info

Ethnic/Immigrant Services (P84)

Cultural, Ethnic Awareness (A23)

Nonprofit Management (S50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Depending on the profile of the country, refugees are invited into the US including Utah, substantial number of whom do not know English nor are they familiar with our way of life such as from Somalia and Afghanistan. Although legal, they struggle to survive on a daily basis due to not knowing the English language and not knowing the process on how significant tasks are accomplished in our American society. Even though they qualify for substantial assistance to help them survive and prosper they but do not know how to ask/apply for such help due the language and cultural barrier they encounter. Therefore, we provide them free language and guidance the system 24-7 by language and culturally adept social workers from within their own community. We believe we fill a unique service niche providing a safety-net 24-7 to one of the most vulnerable members of our society - extremely poor refugees who do not know English nor our way of life.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Refugee Language and Guidance Services of Survival

Language interpretation and translation and guidance through the system is provided free to refugees for refugee communities with whom we get engaged.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Immigrants and migrants

English Language and acculturation training is provided to refugees so that can accomplish significant tasks in the lives on their own without needing intervention. Two 15 class session semesters are organized over a calendar year with typically 15 students registering in each with 5 students exceeding expectations, 5 students meeting expectations, and 5 needing additional training.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Immigrants and migrants

Annual free family-oriented cultural festival featuring multi-ethnic performing arts representing people from around the world to promote cultural diversity, ethnic inclusion, and mutual understanding and goodwill.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Immigrants and migrants

Covid Community-based Project
Outreach for Covid prevention, detection, and treatment in services organized by ourselves and participating in services provided by partner agencies and the government.

Population(s) Served

Outreach into the Somali refugee community in Salt Lake County to foster establishing community-based small businesses.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
People of African descent

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of eligible clients who report having access to an adequate array of services and supports

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent, People of Arab descent, Social and economic status

Related Program

Refugee Language and Guidance Services of Survival

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

An eligible client is one who does not know English nor how to navigate our system offered free language interpretation and guidance 24-7 in this case Somali refugees in Salt Lake County.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We have been providing our language interpretation and guidance service to refugees 24-7 since 2006. Each year we help approximately 150 refugees performing over 600 assignments. Our English language and acculturation training began in 2015. We conduct 2 semester each calendar year each semester lasting four months with 15 students in each class. One third or 5 students graduate every year with one third 5 students requiring semester's training and one third 5 students need two additional semester's training to graduate. We also conduct a free family-oriented multi-ethnic performing arts festival to provide visibility to our organization and to promote inclusion of diversity and goodwill among all residents of Salt Lake County.
We work with Utah Dept of Health and Human Services Office of Health Equity in the COVID detection, cure, and prevention program.
We participate in the Salt Lake County program to foster Somali Community-base small businesses.

We annually accomplishing our goal of helping extremely poor refugees who do not know English survive since 2006 by providing them free language interpreters and guides through the system 24-7 through grants from Eccles Foundation, Salt Lake County Mayor's Office Contribution, and a grant from the LDS Church and now also from Utah Department of Health Disparities Office related to COVID-19. Our social workers are bilingual speaking both English and the language of the refugee client and are acculturated to the American way of life to be able to help refugees accomplish vital tasks in their daily lives. Our social workers are paid a modest fixed amount for performing their assignments 24-7.

Our Survival English and Acculturation class is a custom-designed for refugees by a professional linguist who has experience in English as a Second Language training who has worked with refugees over the last ten years. The class focuses on specific real-world contextual scenarios in different significant aspects of American life. Once trained the refugee is well equipped to be successful in conducting transactions relating to these vital scenarios. This training is designed for our refugee clients to become self-reliant and independent of our language assistance and guidance through the system to make room for new refugee arrivals and students in our program. The curriculum continues to undergo improvement through student feedback.

Our success since 2006 and unblemished experience backed up by impeccable references including Salt Lake County Mayor and tribute to our work by our major grant maker Eccles Foundation demonstrates that we are not only able to continue to conduct our programs but also able to improve them. These program show significant measurable results and improvement in the quality of life for the refugees. This program alleviates the burden on government social service programs and enables the refugees to stand on their own two feet and become a contributing member of our society. We have demonstrated the not only the social service skills to successfully conducting our programs but also effective project and financial management including project reporting on them. Our organization and its mission is truly altruistic as all staff contributed their labor while make a living elsewhere.

We have accomplished a successful twelve year record of our language interpretation and translation and guidance through the system program available 24-7 free to refugees financed by a variety of grant makers from 2006 through 2018. With a budget of $18,000 we serve 160 clients performing about 600 assignments annually. We have provided status and project reporting to grant makers including government entities and have successfully been audited by them as needed. We are the recipient of a letter of recognition/recommendation from the current and previous Salt Lake County Mayors. Our grant makers have also complimented us on our work.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The refugee clients we serve face significant English language and Western cultural barriers.

Financials

Salt Lake American
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Salt Lake American

Board of directors
as of 02/11/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Abdul Baset Aljareh

Salt Lake American/Salt Lake American Muslim

Term: 2006 -

Ali Akbar Hasnain

Alrasool Islamic Center Community Leader

Simon So

Attorney

Abdul Baset Aljareh

Alrasool Islamic Center Community Leader

Ghulam Patel

Pakistani Muslim Community Leader

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/18/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian/Asian American
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian/Asian American
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/14/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.