Just in Time for Foster Youth

Just in Time for Foster Youth engages a caring community to help transition-age foster youth, ages 18-26, achieve self-sufficiency and well-being in San Diego.

aka Just in Time, JIT   |   San Diego, CA   |  http://www.jitfosteryouth.org/

Mission

Just in Time engages a caring community to help transitioning foster youth achieve self-sufficiency and well-being. We envision a future in which every youth leaving the foster care system has a community of caring adults waiting for them after 18. We believe consistent, long-term help from the heart is the foundation for the success of our youth so that they can thrive and enjoy productive, satisfying lives.

Ruling year info

2007

CEO: Chief Empowerment Officer

Mr. Don Wells

Main address

Mailing Address: PO Box 601627

San Diego, CA 92160 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-5448416

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The lives of foster youth have been defined by persistent, multi-generational lack of health equity. Conditions that lead to removal from families struggling with challenging home environments are often the beginning of marginalization that becomes the norm as they move through foster care. Just in Time for Foster Youth (JIT) services are designed to address the impact of these Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) by providing knowledge, resources, positive experiences and supportive relationships that reduce further trauma and toxic stress while fortifying self-regulation skills, core capabilities, and physical, emotional and mental health that makes them less likely to suffer from outcomes that exposure to ACEs would predict. Our goal is to engage a caring community to help transition-age foster youth in San Diego County, ages 18-26, achieve self-sufficiency and well-being to become Confident, Capable and Connected.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency/Basic Needs

Basic/Emergency Needs: As JIT's most utilized service and often the entry point to our community, Basic Needs provides immediate financial assistance with rent money, bus passes, gas cards, interview clothing, vehicle repair, food and other urgent needs; and advice on practical matters such as budgeting, smart decision-making, and creating a plan to cushion savings and avoid future financial emergencies.Example: One case in point is the story of Briana, who took her car in for repairs because the wheel was wobbly and loose. She was quoted nearly $1,000 for repairs including new struts, shocks, and alignment. After Briana had a consult with a JIT volunteer, he discovered that most of the work quoted was unnecessary. He spoke with the repair shop and the final bill for repairs was approximately $90, a savings of $900!

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

My First Home: Connects participants to volunteer community members who help transform an apartment into a comfortable and homey space; as well as, provide guidance on smart purchasing and expenses related to the home. My First Home essentials include donated furniture comprising a bed, dresser, sofa, kitchen table and chairs, and other large furnishings; as well as, kitchen items, linens, lamps, small appliances, accessories and cleaning supplies, to ensure a stable home.Example: Wesley describes his experience with My First Home after he was homeless and transitioning from foster care: ""Just In Time helped me furnish my first apartment with a bed, sofa, table and chairs and other stuff you need to live. They also paid my first month's rent and deposit to help me get off the streets and start my new life. When I received a laptop, it was the most essential tool for my music business and, without it, I would still be dreaming about my life instead of living it."

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

College Bound, Learning to Succeed, Study Abroad, JItTerniships & Master Your Dream: Provides participants with key resources and encouragement they need to begin a new life chapter as college students, graduate and fulfill their education goals. Youth connect with potential lifelong mentors and successful JIT CB Alumni, receive laptops and printers, learn valuable tips on money management, legal matters and practical purchases, and pair up with a JIT Volunteer Shopper to buy essential dorm furnishings and school supplies. For ongoing college support, JIT volunteers and staff provide additional academic support and encouragement to achieve an 80% retention/graduation rate. They also provide a supportive community that makes all aspects of the academic success and beyond more likely, including Study Abroad, internships supported by JIT, and post-graduate scholarships. Example: Alejandra's words after her College Bound experience (University of San Diego student, 2013-2017): "Everyone was so nice!! I didn't really know what to expect coming into this program, but WOW, I was really surprised. A lot of time people don't say what they mean and don't follow through, but everyone I met made me feel like they really meant what they were saying. I'm really glad I went today, everyone was great. I really look forward to being a part of JIT."

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Career Horizons for Young Women/Bridges to Success for Young Men: Supports youth pursuing a GED high school diploma, and those pursuing careers. These programs are designed to help youth bring their employment options into focus and build trusting, supportive connections. Through presentations, discussion, job shadowing, and one-on-one contact with powerful role models, participants are given the tools and support to recognize their strengths and include entrepreneurship and non-traditional higher paying fields in their futures. They are also given the opportunity to begin make lasting connections that can build the networks, career links, and personal relationships essential to professional development and success.Example 1: Beronica a participant in Career Horizons (2011-2012) said ""The most beneficial aspect of the program was the internship I landed after Marcy Morrison's class, Finding Your Niche. Another mentor, Gretchen, heard me speak of my passion for finance, and just happened to know a woman that is the head of the HR department at a company called nPHASE. Seeing my dreams finally mold is something I have been waiting for, and having my amazing mentor, Pat Feld, be there every step of the way, has made this journey even more enjoyable. Example 2: Andres, an active participant in Bridges to Success has found a community of men he can rely on. The content of the meetings has provided deep meaning and reflection that has been useful in powerful ways in everyday situations. He relied on the Bridge Champion Volunteers to help him resolve marital struggles and keep his family on track, while maintaining full-time employment through encouragement and care. The Bridge Champions has not only provided him with advice and support during crises, but they have also attended his football games in semi-pro league where Andres plays.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Financial Fitness: Offers participants opportunities to learn basic and advanced money management and an ability to match up to $4,500! With real-world financial gurus, online tools, and comprehensive classes offered 12 times per year, youth are equipped with the knowledge and discipline to make smart money purchases.Example: Participant Karen developed discipline with her finances through JIT's Financial Fitness program. She regularly works with her Volunteer Asset Advisor, attends seminars and classes, and explores innovative ways to save. Without the Financial Fitness program, Karen would not have learned how to budget, create a savings plan, and save each month. She has been rewarded for her consistent savings patterns by matching three times for school and investments. Karen has developed long-lasting strategies and tactics to learn the basics of saving each and every month, with the hope of saving over a lifetime, in addition to her long-lasting connection to a caring adult.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Unaddressed barriers and lack of resources post-foster care result in alarming outcomes. Approximately 25% of former foster youth report being homeless within 1 - 4 years of exiting. 1 in 4 are involved in the criminal justice system within two years. And by age 24, earnings for former foster youth in California average only $690 per month.

Through Pathways to Financial Power/NEXTjobs, Just in Time participants build a wholly different future. Youth engage in a 10-month cohort including over 30 hours of interactive workshops focused on interviewing skills, capacity building, money management, technology education and more. Workshops are led by community leaders and volunteers who provide one-on-one coaching; access to training on networking, interviewing, resume writing and entrepreneurship; and referrals to internships and meaningful jobs.

As Ivan experienced first-hand, “I needed to do things on my own because I didn’t have a network to help me find a well-paying job, apply for school and connect in a healthy way outside of my circle of people who weren’t the best influences.”

The annual Pathways conference brings it all together to provide youth with the tools they need to achieve success and financial stability including high-quality headshots, expert presentations, an impactful financial simulation that tests the financial literacy skills they’ve built throughout the 10-month cohort, a career exploration fair to connect to entry-level jobs and internships, and professional connections. Participants also have the chance to take part in an inspiring Shark Tank competition that showcases their entrepreneurial promise as they vie for an investment in their idea. Pre and post-conference, participants are partnered with Pathways coaches that help them put together personalized plans to actualize their dreams. The coaches also continue to assist participants with building much-needed connections within their chosen career fields.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

In their groundbreaking study of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), Dr. Vincent Felitti and Dr. Robert Anda identified 10 ACEs, giving each one a point; the higher the ACEs score, the much higher the likelihood of diseases and disorders including obesity, heart disease, anxiety, depression, emphysema, cancer, unintended pregnancies, suicide and even premature death. Research by the Administration for Children and Families revealed that a score of at least four ACEs “has been associated with as much as a 12-fold increase in negative health outcomes in adulthood.”

A survey of JIT participants revealed EVERY respondent scored eight or higher on the ACEs scale, pointing to a critical need to address the health and well-being of our youth in a direct and focused way. Unless fully addressed, the measurable negative physical and mental health consequences will have a tangible cost to our public health system and society at large. JIT is meeting that challenge head-on through its innovative new initiative Rise to Resilience (R2R) to help participants thrive on the same level as other young people without a history of toxic stress.

JIT’s innovative new initiative, Rise to Resilience, is committed to measurable change that helps participants thrive on the same level as other young people without a history of toxic stress. R2R focuses on access to six key strategies proven to manage and lessen the consequences of toxic stress: nutrition, exercise, sleep, healthy relationships, mindfulness and trauma-informed therapy.

A key component of R2R is an annual 12-month cohort of 40-50 participants who will engage in a focused curriculum of targeted information and resources integrated with ongoing coaching and reinforcement. The goal is to create a model that can be applied to any population likely to suffer from poor physical and mental health outcomes that exposure to ACEs would predict.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Recent research suggests that transportation equity – access to a driver’s license, reliable transportation, and car ownership – has beneficial impact on low-income people and their families. Being a driver not only improves job search activities but also job retention, especially when public transit service is unavailable.

In addition, being a driver provides flexibility beyond work-related trips, so that individuals can meet other daily needs related to child care, education, shopping heath care, and etc. For transitioning foster youth, having access to this fundamental resource has been a major unfilled gap.

Changing Lanes/Auto Access is an initiative that encourages and assists participants who want to obtain their driver’s license and find affordable, reliable transportation. In collaboration with partners and volunteers, the resource is designed to empower transitioning foster youth to become good drivers, purchase reliable transportation, and create a foundation for maintaining vehicle ownership responsibly to expand access to jobs and capacity building opportunities as well as building credit.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Where we work

Awards

Star Awards for the nonprofit organization and business making a positive impact on the prevention of child abuse in San Diego County 2009

County of San Diego, Commission on Children, Youth, and Families

Kathryn Vaughn, JIT Founding President 2010

California Volunteer of the Year

Neighborhood Builders Award 2012

Bank of America

Outstanding Young Nonprofit Professional 2010

Young Nonprofit Professionals Networs

Capcacity Building Partnership Grant 2014

San Diego Social Venture Partners

Commissioners' Award 2014

San Diego Ciunty Juvenile Justice Commission

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of services touchpoints (financial distributions/resources/staff connections) to participants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

FY20 total touchpoints number is 12,390.

Number of unduplicated/unique transition age foster youth (18-26) served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

826 unduplicated/unique youth served FY20

Toal number of active volunteers (all categories)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of volunteers in FY20: 770

Total volunteer hours

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

FY20 Volunteer Hours: 7032 Skilled & unskilled hours, Coaches/Mentors account for 43% of all volunteer hours.

Total My First Home furnishings set-up

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

My First Home

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

102 My First Home set-ups in FY20

Total Emergency Basic Needs assists

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency/Basic Needs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

FY20 Emergency/Basic Needs distributions: 533

Total College Bound participants since 2007

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth

Related Program

College Bound/Learning to Succeed/Master Your Dream

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

80% enrollment/graduation rates over the lifetime of the service compared to the National average of 3-6% FY20 Total: 712

Percentage of College Bound participants enrolled/graduated since 2007

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth

Related Program

College Bound/Learning to Succeed/Master Your Dream

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

FY20: 75%

Percentage of youth saving each month after partcipating in Pathways to Financial Power

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth

Related Program

Pathways to Financial Power/NEXTjobs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Increase from 22% before Pathways participation

Percentage of young men after participating in Bridges to Success who say they have someone they can talk to about thier problems

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth

Related Program

Career Horizons/Bridges to Success

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Up from 30% before Bridges to Success participation

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

For most young people who have experienced foster care, the system that was intended to protect them has failed. In their young lives, they faced the abuse and or neglect that caused them to be removed from their homes, but also the significant barriers to critical necessities like stable housing, reliable healthcare, food security, and consistent access to education. Then, when they leave the system at a stage in life when every young person needs someone they can rely on who can buffer the powerful changes they are going through and model healthy coping strategies, most transition age youth are socially isolated with no stable relationship to an adult, no trusted community, and no safety net. And, when they have children that they are not prepared to care for, the cycle continues.

Traditional solutions and conventional thinking about services for youth who ‘age out’ of foster care without permanent families has not broken the cycle because it only addresses the current “presenting problem” with a focus on resources to create “self-sufficiency.” This has resulted in “solving” immediate deficits by providing transitional housing for a limited period, access to college scholarships, and job and life skills training. This program-focused approach has largely ignored the underlying roots of marginalization of foster youth populations and the impacts of the high levels of toxic stress that most foster youth have experienced that create the critical need for positive relationships and a reliable community of support combined with access to resources.

Just in Time for Foster Youth’s (JIT) model disrupts the “Programs/Systems” mindset and replaces it with a “Youth-Centric/Community” framework that broadens the scope of issues to be tackled in a unique and more effective way. People thrive in healthy communities that they create, not systems that act on them. This shift in focus honors relationships, allows individualized support, respects the participants’ empowered role in their own transformation, and encourages an interconnected/collaborative approach to achieve lasting impact. Resources offered in the context of supportive relationships are more effective and more likely to have durable impact.

The JIT mission is to engage a caring community to help transition age youth (18-26) achieve self-sufficiency and well-being. Over the last 16 years, JIT’s model has combined a wide variety of resources with the opportunity to develop close personal relationships with adult volunteers and lived experience youth. We meet youth where they are and empower them to learn and grow into confident, capable, connected adults. By making connection to community the foundation of the solution, JIT ensures a more sustainable and durable change in the lives of those we serve.

As a general rule, our society allows young people ample time to finish school, begin a career and build a support network prior to expecting them to be on their own. Yet, we expect 18-21 year old foster youth to fend for themselves with no familial safety net, limited success in post-secondary education, no financial security and a system filled with critical barriers, unaddressed gaps in resources, and low expectations for change.

JIT is uniquely focused on developing a new model for durable change for former foster youth by mobilizing the community as an extended family for young people in transition, providing the consistent authentic relationships and emergency resources they need to achieve productive lives. This means managing hundreds of engaged volunteers for an effective model for relationship based service. Although our service area is San Diego County, we intend to create a model for change that can be exported to other communities.

JIT services meet the expressed needs of our youth by providing resources for both short-term stabilization and long-term capacity building.

• Emergency Basic Needs/Healthy Practices: Knowledge of and access to support systems, including housing, employment support, educational options, life planning, and health care
• My First Home: Home furnishings to establish a safe, stable, supportive place to live
• Career Horizons/Financial Horizons: Opportunity for female participants to build confidence and connect with a network of coaches
• Bridges to Success: Opportunity for male participants to build skills and connect to resources in a supportive environment of success
• Financial Fitness: Individualized financial planning assistance and resources, including match savings up to $4,500
• College Bound: Opportunity and resources to continue and meet higher education goals, including Study Abroad and post-graduate school
• Changing Lanes: Empowers youth to become good drivers and purchase reliable transportation
• Pathways to Financial Power/NEXTjobs: Provides comprehensive guidance to achieve financial security through strategies that lead to meaningful work and smart money management
• Rise to Resilience: Committed to help participants thrive on the same level as young people without a history of toxic stress. R2R focuses on six key strategies to manage and lessen the consequences of toxic stress: nutrition, exercise, sleep, healthy relationships, mindfulness, and trauma-informed therapy.

JIT currently serves approximately 800 transition age youth annually, 18-26, majority female (65%). The ethnic backgrounds served are Hispanic (34%), African-American (26%) Caucasian (25%), Native Americans (2%) and other identified (13%).

JIT’s services increase true equity and inclusion. They are based on the recognition that if lifelong disparities in access to safety, resources and positive connections are not addressed, simply giving someone temporary housing, a scholarship to college, and job training can actually further traumatize a young person and reinforce a sense of failure when they don’t have the basic foundational skills necessary for them to succeed.

Our consistent, durable vision is for JIT youth to attain self-sufficiency levels significantly higher than the unacceptable national averages by providing essential resources and crucial relationships at critical junctures delivered by a caring family of volunteers. Our core belief is that disconnection remains the central, lingering "gap" for foster youth once they are removed from their parents, a void that continues through multiple placements and after the date of emancipation.

All of JIT’s services are designed and delivered with this fundamental understanding. Each one is adaptable to individual and specific self-identified needs. Youth Services coordinators, all with lived experienced in foster care, are the leads in providing the appropriate resources and experiences from participants’ introduction to the JIT community until they turn 27, an extended window of service that recognizes the need to build capacity over time to overcome past inequities. Working with JIT staff, long-term volunteer coaches, peer mentors and a stable community they remain connected to even beyond service eligibility, the gaps in development caused by childhood toxic stress are closed.

In FY2019, JIT’s community of 28 team members and over 600 volunteers served almost 800 unduplicated transition age foster youth by providing resources and connections across multiple services to move the needle significantly for every young person who eligible for our assistance. We employ former foster youth as staff in leadership roles and service delivery. There is tremendous power in seeing yourself in the person you reach out to when you must share your story and vulnerability. And more power in being able to see your possible success in theirs.

A life of uncertainty and disconnection is the core obstacle for transition age foster youth; therefore, consistent connection is the core solution. Engaging youth in consistent relationships with volunteers is a foundational element of our mission. Timely intervention at a critical juncture is the difference between hope and despair.

Our focus is on individual empowerment, earned trust, and consistent, proactive response to youth in need. We believe that every young person has the power to create his/her own success, and our individualized service views participants as our collaborative partners.

When we talk about achieving significantly higher self-sufficiency levels than the “unacceptable national averages”, we are referring to changing the traditional snapshots of negative outcomes for youth post-foster care that have been reported from various studies over many years such as:
• Approximately 25% of former foster youth reported being homeless within 2 to 4 years
• Foster youth are 14 times more likely drop out of college than the general population
• 1 in 4 were involved in the criminal justice system within 2 years of leaving care.
• 7 out of 10 girls who age out of foster care will become pregnant before the age of 21

Our goal is to both preventative and proactive, meaning our services are designed to help youth with the knowledge, resources and relationships to become Confident, Capable and Connected, changing the current picture for our participants and predicting future success. For example, for approximately 800 youth served in the last fiscal year, some participant results were:
• 237 received emergency Basic Needs assistance, including rent to avoid homelessness
• 125 had My First Home set-ups to allow resources to be prioritized for other purposes
• 96% of 2018 College Bound students were still enrolled after the first year
• The enrollment/graduation rate for all College Bound participants (2007-2018) is 80%
• Less that 0.5% of active participants have any reported criminal justice involvement
• Only 40 of the our participants 21 and under are parents

Other JIT outcomes are gathered around four essential factors that help transform the lives of the young people we serve. Each of our services is designed to achieve and track those factors over time through multiple intended impacts. For example:

1) Fills Gaps In Knowledge & Experience
Pathways to Financial Power participants learn and practice effective financial management, including budgeting, savings and establishing strong credit
% of Youth saving money each month
22% Before Pathways
70% After Pathways

2) Identify Self-Limiting Beliefs & Real Personal Strengths
After College Bound, 47.5% fewer participants felt academically limited because of past foster care experience and 100% stated they had the necessary resources to achieve their academic goals

3) Take Ownership of Their Stories & Authentic Voice
89% of Walk the Talk participants were confident their stories has value
80% of participants believe their story deserves to be shared

4) Connections to Trusted Relationships with Supportive Adults/Positive Peers.
Post- Bridges to Success for Youth Men participants have someone they can talk to about their problems
Before B2S: 30% After B2S: 82%

5) Launched our Lasting Impact Fulfillment Tracking (LIFT) project in 2020 to track specific impact outcomes post-JIT, by surveying past participants age 27-35. This tool enhances our capacity to achieve lasting impact for the young people we serve and set new standards of service for all transition age youth.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Alumni interviews,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    - Based on feedback and observations about a need for a stronger focus on participant well-being, we launched our Rise to Resilience service with extensive feedback from the youth to be served and led by a staff member with lived foster care experience. - We have extended our services to JIT alumni due to feedback provided from our Lasting Impact Fulfillment Tracking (LIFT).

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Just in Time for Foster Youth
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Just in Time for Foster Youth

Board of directors
as of 3/8/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Brad Livingston

RWM (Residential Wholesale Mortgage)

Term: 2019 -


Board co-chair

Ted DeFrank

Chris Burr

Lauri Buehler

Steven Buehler

Grace Chui-Miller

David Schulman

Nancy Spector

Dan Fulkerson

Tracy Burgett

Bill Morgan

Robert Freund

Pierre Towns

Scott Arnold

Gordon Boerner

Evangeline Dech

Brad Lupien

Pilar Meza

Jessica Pressman

Keisha Robinson

Luis Valencia-Moreno

Samuel Webster

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/03/2019

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/03/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.