PLATINUM2024

Save A Forgotten Equine

Unforgettable Horses

aka SAFE   |   Redmond, WA   |  https://www.safehorses.org

Mission

To rescue, rehabilitate, and retrain horses facing neglect or abuse and provide them with the best opportunity for a permanent home and a lifetime of safety.

Notes from the nonprofit

SAFE has always operated with full transparency, honesty, and to the highest standards of professional ethics. We are grateful that Guidestar provides a platform for this.

Ruling year info

2007

Executive Director

Bonnie Hammond

Operations Director

Terry Phelps-Peddy

Main address

PO Box 2769

Redmond, WA 98073-2769 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-5825355

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Animal rescue organizations are an important part of our society. They help save animals from abuse and neglect, and also help raise awareness about animal cruelty. As a horse rescue organization, SAFE focuses on the plight of unwanted and mistreated equines in our community. The horses we take in arrive hungry, weak, and afraid. We restore their health and spirit, provide them with patient handling and training, and when they're ready, we carefully select the best possible adoptive home. Once adopted, annual follow-up visits are conducted to ensure the animal's continued well-being.

In a region with a significant horse population, SAFE stands alone as the primary equine rescue resource for animal control agencies and horse owners in need of assistance. SAFE's mission is to rescue, rehabilitate, retrain, and rehome horses facing neglect or abuse, providing them with the best opportunity for a permanent home and a lifetime of safety.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Equine Rescue & Rehabilitation

As one of the few remaining horse rescue organizations in the region, SAFE is often the last and only hope for local horses facing neglect, abuse, or starvation. These extraordinary animals, who played a key historical role in the building of our nation, are utterly dependent on humans for their survival. Horses rescued by SAFE come to us in desperate need of food, medical care, shelter, safety, and kindness. Our rehabilitation program addresses these needs by providing new intakes with emergency medical care and careful re-feeding programs for starvation cases. After they are stabilized, our horses receive the necessary routine care that many have previously gone without, including dental care, hoof care, deworming, and vaccinations. Once they are returned to good health, our training program provides the education they need to become good equine citizens, who can then be adopted into homes where they will never again face neglect or abuse.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Horse ownership can be rewarding, but it can also be very demanding, physically as well as monetarily. Some cases of poor care or neglect stem from horse owners that are simply overwhelmed by those demands. Horse owners who have fallen on hard times and need help caring for or finding new
homes for their horses frequently contact SAFE asking for help, so we try to help in other ways.

Through Community Outreach, SAFE provides the following assistance to community members:

• Short-term assistance with hay or grain

• Emergency or routine/preventative vet care

• No-questions-asked gelding services for stallions in our community

• Through SAFE's Serenity Fund, we can help provide humane euthanasia when letting go is the best choice.

It is our hope that by offering short-term assistance to horse owners, we can avoid future situations in which their horses may end up at risk.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Emergency herd dispersal for large groups of horses that have been abandoned and neglected and need new homes

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Best use of Social Media by a Charity, International 2011

Equine Social Media Awards

Best Local Charity (5th Place) 2010

Evening Magazine Best of Western Washington

Best Local Charity (7th Place) 2009

Evening Magazine Best of Western Washington

Best Local Charity (6th Place) 2008

Evening Magazine Best of Western Washington

Best Local Charity (3rd Place) 2011

Evening Magazine Best of Western Washington

Affiliations & memberships

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member 2022

Homes for Horses Coalition 2020

Equine Welfare Network 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals euthanized

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Equine Rescue & Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Horses Euthanized or Deceased: Most of these horses were not able to be saved, due the extremes of neglect. Rather than prolonging suffering, we chose to give them a dignified, peaceful passing.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Equine Rescue & Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals rehomed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Equine Rescue & Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SAFE's ultimate goal would be a world in which all horse owners take responsibility for their animals: responsibility for their care, responsibility for their safety, and responsibility for their passing.

The horses that we take into our rescue program have been failed by the very people who were supposed to have taken care of them. For some of our horses, their owners recognized this failing in time to seek help. Others were not so lucky. It hurts to see a horse brought low by cruelty or neglect; in part, because horses, by nature, ask so little from their caregivers yet give so much. It never ceases to amaze us that a horse, having been so cruelly mistreated by its owners, will nearly always approach us with a willingness to trust.

They say you can judge our society by the way we treat the most helpless among us. If each of us took responsibility for the well being of the animals in our care, even if that means hard work or sacrifice, our world would be a better place. If cruelty and neglect towards animals was something that was not tolerated by any of us, our world would be a better place.

Animal rescue can be disheartening at times, because it seems that no matter how many you save, there is a never-ending stream of others in need of help. At SAFE, as soon as we've placed one horse into a great adoptive home, another horse in desperate need is right there to take its place. Enlarging our capacity to take in more horses would be one way to try to keep up with the need, but that does nothing to help the underlying problem of equine abuse and neglect. So we have to look for other ways to make a change.

1) Increased support for Animal Control agencies.

Animal Control agencies have authority under the law to stop animal cruelty by seizing animals and by prosecuting those who mistreat them. In this region, despite the large numbers of horses owned by citizens, Animal Control agencies do not have their own resources at hand to house and care for horses. SAFE has made it our priority to support local Animal Control whenever we can, in hopes that our assistance will make them more likely to take action in cruelty cases involving horses. Not only can we provide shelter and care to seized or surrendered horses, we can also assist in prosecution by documenting the recovery of the horses in our care, and testifying in court when needed. In the vast majority of these cases, ownership of these horses is signed over to SAFE, giving us the responsibility for finding them new homes. We hope that by partnering with Animal Control agencies, we can help them become more effective in stopping animal cruelty. We also hope that if more people recognize that neglect and cruelty have serious repercussions under the law, perhaps we will see less of it happening.

2) Advocacy, awareness, and education

We must do all we can to shed light on the issue of neglected and abused horses.

SAFE has been rescuing, rehabilitating, retraining, and rehoming neglected horses for 15 years. In that time, we have dealt with hundreds of cases of starvation, abuse, and neglect, both willful and ignorant. We've assisted horse owners facing death, cancer, job loss, property loss, domestic abuse, and other life-shattering situations that prevented them from caring from their animals. We've working alongside animal control agencies and law enforcement to support their ability to stop animal cruelty and bring those guilty of it to justice.

Along the way, we've made mistakes and we've learned from them. We've had our hearts broken, and we've carried on. We've also watched hundreds of horses transformed from broken to beautiful, and celebrated as they started their new lives. We never stop learning, growing, or adding to our experience.

We are also extremely fortunate to have the support and partnership of many excellent equine professionals in our area — veterinarians, farriers, trainers, and suppliers — who believe in our mission and in our ability to make a difference. Together we are extremely capable of restoring horses to health and safety, and starting them down a path in which they will never need to be rescued again.

Since our inception, we have rescued 258 horses facing neglect, abuse, starvation, or slaughter.

223 horses have been successfully adopted into new homes
30 horses have been returned to SAFE by their adopters and rehomed
40 were euthanized or passed away due to effects of neglect or aging
2 horses were returned to their owner by the court
30 horses are currently in our care and awaiting adoption
2 of those are pending adoption

121 horses from Animal Control seizures or surrenders

(statistics current as of 1/27/2022)

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Save A Forgotten Equine

Board of directors
as of 06/06/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Trish Markey

Joel Conner

Advisory Council

Trish Markey

Sheila Otter

Lisa Pascualy

Lauren Engle

Ruth Kennedy

Barb Jensen

Ari Gurewitz

Advisory Council

Leigh Jasper

Amanda Madorno

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/17/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/15/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.