Stover Animal Rescue Inc

Help Us Help Them!

aka Stover Animal Rescue   |   Stover, MO   |  www.stoveranimalrescue.com

Mission

Our mission is: 1) to temporarily provide quality medical and daily care and rehabilitation to needy cats and dogs until suitable permanent homes can be found; and 2) to promote, support and collaborate with efforts to improve quality of life for animals in our local community, those served by regional advocacy groups, and those animals needing aid through worldwide rescue operations. It is our intent to meet and exceed all regulations and guidelines applicable to our nonprofit rescue organization, to constantly improve the services we provide, to promote volunteerism, to abide by fiscally responsible business practices, and to engage in appropriate fundraising efforts in order to remain financially solvent.

Notes from the nonprofit

The last three years have seen major improvements to our kennels, building, and grounds thanks to the generous support of donors and the tireless efforts of wonderful volunteers! We are truly grateful to be a contributing member of our local small rural community thanks to the teamwork of all.

Ruling year info

2013

President, Board of Directors

Nancy Capps

Vice President

Dr. Kellien Kuschel

Main address

709 West 4th Street, PO Box 332

Stover, MO 65078 USA

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Formerly known as

OSAGE VALLEY ANIMAL RESCUE INC

EIN

20-5855947

NTEE code info

(Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs)) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our biggest need this year is more local volunteers to help with staffing the rescue. Our second need is continuing to receive adequate donations to off-set the expenses of operating the rescue (including much needed repairs to the cat care area and dog kennels) and providing outreach services to the local community.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Animal Rescue

We are a small rural NO-KILL rescue, staffed entirely by volunteers, and take in abused, abandoned, and stray cats and dogs as we have space and the resources to care for them. We rehab them and get them healthy, and then try to find the best match for a forever home.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

We provide low cost spay, neuter, and rabies vaccinations - including TNR (trap/neuter/return) of stray and feral cats in the local Stover and surrounding area to reduce overpopulation and protect the health of individually owned, stray, and feral cat colonies. As we have funding available, we also provide food and supplies to enable pets staying in their homes to reduce the burden of re-homing them through rescues.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals with freedom from hunger and thirst

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Family relationships, Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Social and economic status

Related Program

Animal Rescue

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This is the number of animals we've helped through intakes to and dispositions from the rescue each year. This metric is dependent on the volunteers helping at the rescue.

Number of animals rehomed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status

Related Program

Animal Rescue

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is how many animals in our care that have found loving homes or have been transferred to other licensed rescues. We pre-screen adopters and make home visits when considered desirable.

Number of animals vaccinated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Animal Rescue

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All animals in our care receive age-appropriate vaccinations. Since 2018, we have increased our focus on outreach spay, neuter, and rabies vaccinations in local and surrounding areas

Number of dogs spayed or neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status

Related Program

Animal Rescue

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All dogs in our care are spayed and neutered prior to finding their forever families. We also provide low cost spay/neuter assistance as a community service as funds are available.

Number of animals returned to their owner

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Animal Rescue

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We hold animals identified as strays, advertise for the owners, and assist with those who call indicating a lost animal. Animals are scanned for chips, and chipped prior to adoption.

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status

Related Program

Animal Rescue

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All animals in our care are spayed and neutered prior to finding their forever families. We have increased our focus on spay/neuter for community cats since 2018 - including TNRs.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Animal Rescue

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These were the number of cats and dogs successfully adopted directly from our rescue to good homes.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Animal Rescue

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number reflects total number of dogs and cats cared for in the rescue or in our foster homes before adoption or transfer.

Average adoption fee (in dollars) per dog adopted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Related Program

Animal Rescue

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Adoption fees recover part of the costs of spay/neuter, vaccinations, microchipping, preventive health tests, and preventive treatments.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our first goal is to acquire and keep 10 additional local volunteers this next year.

Our second goal is to receive at least $15,000 more this year in funding.

Our third goal is to continue to improve our outreach programs to our local community to help keep pets at home when possible - reducing the burden on rescues.

Our fourth goal is to continue to reduce our rescue costs in every reasonable way we can.

Goal one - volunteers: We have implemented regular staff meetings to improve communication and deal with perceived problems promptly. We are working to improve policies and procedures to help with training and preventing problems; and looking for better ways to express our gratitude for the work that is being accomplished. We are also partnering with our local school to promote volunteerism, and increasing our online presence with volunteer resources like VolunteerMatch, Benevity, GreaterGood, etc. The current issues with Covid-19 are hoped to be temporary.

Goal two - funding: We are continuing to thank and report outcomes to our current donating groups, and looking for available grants and other funding sources. We are partnering with other advocacy groups to share grant-writing expertise and networking contacts.

Goals three and four - improving outreach services and reducing costs: We are partnering with local veterinarians to offer low cost spay and neuter clinics, offering microchip clinics to ensure a lost pet returns home (thus keeping them out of the shelter), and promoting TNR (trap/neuter/return) for stray and feral cats to control the pet population (thus keeping the colonies healthier and out of the shelter). We are also price checking all our expenses again and looking for ways to combine therapies and trade volunteer hours for training and other services when possible.

We have a committed and talented group of board members this year; and several great volunteers we hope to keep and engage in promoting the work to good friends. We are developing ways to continue to communicate safely within the constraints of the nationwide quarantines and are looking for ways to do smaller events for fundraisers to be safer in the continuing covid-cautious environment.

Our local schools are very supportive of promoting volunteerism, although some of our efforts in that regard have had to be postponed until the fall school year due to closures. We are enlisting the aid of a variety of other local volunteer groups (quilter/crafters, gardeners, church groups, etc.) to partner with us in ways that are doable for them.

We are developing a good track record with those who have funded us in the past in showing positive outcomes and reliable accounting for the methods we use to manage expenditures; and we are committed to the community and assisting animals and their families who are in need as best we can.

We have resources in place for the fall school year to promote volunteer efforts with students; and we have some students actively recruiting for us as well.

We are streamlining our paper processes to provide more accurate statistics for outcomes.

We have partnered with other rescues and veterinarians to provide low-cost spay/neuter/rabies for those who had been scheduled for the spring TNRs we couldn't hold. This is still more expensive than the TNR clinics, but we hope to continue this through the quarantine period; and have managed to hold one TNR clinic this spring.

We continue to price compare and shop in bulk for supplies and food, and have had several distributions of food from suppliers making these items more available locally - especially now while distribution is difficult.

We use social media sites and young virtual volunteers to keep our friends and partners up-to-date on needs and successes.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve primarily lower income families in our community - first by rescuing, rehabbing, and adopting to good homes as many local stray, abandoned, or neglected animals as we can care for; and second by providing assistance with food and essential medical care to enable them to keep pets at home if it is safe to do so. We also assist in getting lost and found pets back to their owners. We also serve partnering animal advocacy groups by assisting with their efforts to provide a better life for animals.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We streamlined our adoption application process to save time when completing applications, and added two questions to aid their choices of the best pet for them.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    They have responded with additional suggestions and by referring others to us. They feel more a part of the whole rescue process; and we hope that will result in more effective volunteering as well.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Stover Animal Rescue Inc

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Stover Animal Rescue Inc

Board of directors
as of 3/22/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Nancy Capps

Stover Animal Rescue

Term: 2020 - 2023


Board co-chair

Dr. Kellien Kuschel

Lake Pet Animal Hospital, Eldon MO

Term: 2017 - 2023

Phyllis Dowdy

Stover Animal Rescue

Eunice Officer

Stover Animal Rescue

Ed Hook

Stover Animal Rescue

Larry Sensenig

Stover Animal Rescue

Kim Keenoy

Stover Animal Rescue

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/22/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/22/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.