ALLIANCE FOR MIDDLE EAST PEACE INC

100+ organizations. One growing movement for peace.

aka ALLMEP   |   Washington, DC   |  www.allmep.org

Mission

Founded in 2006 and headquartered in Washington, DC, with offices in Europe, Israel, and Palestine, the Alliance for Middle East Peace (ALLMEP) is the region’s largest & fastest-growing network of peacebuilding groups, envisioning a future in which Israelis & Palestinians have built the trust necessary to live together in peace, dignity, and security. ALLMEP’s theory of change is rooted in people-to-people partnerships & focused on the work of our 110+ member organizations. ALLMEP strives to radically raise the capacity and visibility of the field, fostering cooperation, and creating a culture for ourselves and our members of best-in-class programming as these NGOs work together to improve and strengthen Arab-Jewish & Israeli-Palestinian relations through people-to-people peacebuilding.

Ruling year info

2007

Executive Director and Head of the European Office

Mr. John Lyndon

Main address

1725 I Street, N.W. Suite 300

Washington, DC 20006 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-5879279

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (Q01)

Promotion of International Understanding (Q20)

International Peace and Security (Q40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The power of both people-to-people programs and economic development as conflict resolution tools is clear: less fear, hatred and violence, increased economic growth, and greater understanding of the other, as well as the stake each party has in a shared future. The U.S.'s support of these priorities, via the International Fund for Ireland (IFI) and USAID's Conflict Management and Mitigation (CMM) programs have helped to build stronger societies in spaces that have been ravaged by war and internal strife in conflict zones. Despite wide awareness of the efficacy of such tools, they have too rarely been harnessed at a significant scale in the Israeli-Palestinian context. We know that they can change lives, but we have never funded them at scale where they can transform entire communities. We can see the consequences all around us. Support for a two-state solution has dropped significantly, while support for violence or zero-sum agendas denying the legitimacy of the other have increase

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Alumni Leadership Program

Over the past decades, Israeli and Palestinian NGOs in the people-to-people peace community have produced tens of thousands of alumni who have been transformed by the experience of meeting and engaging with the Other. The Israelis and Palestinians who have passed through our members’ programs form a privileged constituency in the region who together can form the foundations of lasting peace. Our community’s collective theory of change rests upon the conviction that these alumni are primed for effective leadership to catalyze the change that we envision for the region.

Yet too often, even the most competent organizations are understandably preoccupied with the ongoing work of recruiting and training new participants rather than ensuring that those who have already graduated are leveraging their power for social and political impact. This is why ALLMEP, in partnership with the Social Venture Fund for Jewish-Arab Equality and the Israeli Forum for Alumni Organizations, created the Alumni Leadership Forum.

Since its launch in September 2019, this first-of-its kind program has created a platform that incentivizes partnerships and creates common cause across the societal and political boundaries erected between Israelis and Palestinians and Arabs and Jews. This pilot year brings together 25 alumni coordinators to learn from each other’s best practices, maximize resources, and conduct joint programming to advance and enhance the sphere of alumni engagement. Meeting monthly and culminating in a year-end retreat, ALLMEP’s Alumni Leadership Forum seeks to elevate the conversation on what is possible for the region—opening pathways for the next generation of leaders and deepening the investment of young Israelis and Palestinians as partners for peace.

Population(s) Served
Activists
People of Middle Eastern descent

Inspired by the success of the International Fund for Ireland, the bicameral and bipartisan Partnership Fund for Peace Act of 2019 (H.R. 3104/ S. 1727) will leverage and increase public and private contributions worldwide, funding joint economic development and civil society projects that promote coexistence and a broad support for peace, improving both social and economic conditions on the ground.

This important legislation was introduced on June 5th, 2019 by Chairwoman Nita Lowey (D-NY), Representative Jeff Fortenberry (R-NE), Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Senator Chris Coons (D-DE).

The legislation works toward promoting contact, cooperation, dialogue, shared community building, peaceful coexistence, joint economic development and reconciliation between Israelis and Palestinians. Specifically, the legislation calls for:

● Establishing a Partnership Fund for Peace to facilitate and finance joint ventures and people-to-people exchanges between Israelis, Palestinians and Americans, authorized for $50 million for the first five years and a yearly report to Congress and the public;

● Establishing a board of governors, comprised of five private US citizens with relevant experience, and additional board seats open to other donor countries, to manage the fund, as well as two technical boards made up of specialized experts in people-to-people and economic development to approve small-sized investments;

● Requiring all people-to-people partnerships to include either a Palestinian NGO, an Israeli NGO, or an international NGO that brings Palestinians and Israelis together for coexistence and reconciliation programs, or NGOs that facilitate such programs between Arab and Jewish citizens of Israel;

● Prioritizing partnerships between Palestinian entrepreneurs/companies and counterparts in Israel or the United States; and

● Requiring that all expenditures from the Fund follow mission directives applicable to the West Bank/Gaza that have been issued by USAID and specifically prohibits any assistance from the Fund to be provided to national governments, any individual/group involved/advocating for terror activity and to Hamas, the PA or the PLO.

Population(s) Served
People of Middle Eastern descent
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Peace Projects Award 2014

Turkish Journalists and Writers Foundation

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Youth Attitudes in Israel and Palestine -

Now 26 years after the Oslo Accords, hope for a just and sustainable peace seems remote. After a generation of well-intentioned but unsuccessful diplomacy, public support for peace is at historically low levels. Reports indicate that 47% of Israeli Jews and 71% of Palestinians perceive the conflict as zero-sum: what is good for one side must be bad for the other. Support for a Two-State Solution has been similarly declining over the past decade, dropping below 50% as of December 2017.

At the grassroots level, surveys report that only 25% of Israeli Jews trust Palestinians while only 11% of Palestinians trust Israeli Jews. Israeli Jews believe that Palestinians are determined to do them personal harm while Palestinians see Israeli Jews through the singular lens of the military, which is often the only channel for their exposure to each other. Subsequently, there is a dramatic lack of basic recognition for rights of the Other, reflecting increased dehumanization across all spheres.

We who care about peace between Israelis and Palestinians are urgently searching for new approaches to disrupt the current dynamic. We know from successfully resolved conflicts that people-to-people peacebuilding and a strong civil society are pre-conditions for social and political transformation. They are indispensable prerequisites for peace.

Research overwhelming supports what we in the peacebuilding community have always known: that in deep contrast to mainstream society, graduates of peacebuilding programs have fundamentally different outlooks and attitudes toward the Other. After surveying the work of 164 NGOs, a report by Ned Lazarus, “A Future for Israeli and Palestinian Peacebuilding,” noted a “profound long-term impact for significant numbers of adult graduates 10 to 15 years after their initial encounter experiences.” USAID’s own evaluation of people-to-people peacebuilding programs in Israel & the West Bank confirmed that three to five years after participation, program alumni: stay connected with each other; have enduring positive feelings about the Other side; and maintain an increased belief that peace is possible.

In 2018, ALLMEP conducted a year-long assessment of alumni engagement in our member organizations, encompassing NGOs working in both the shared society & cross-border realms. The conclusions were decisive, finding that Israelis and Palestinians who pass through our members’ programs emerge with opinions & perspectives greatly aligned with the pursuit of peace and are less likely to fall prey to the racism, dehumanization, and calls for violence that are on the rise in both societies.

Despite the empirical knowledge of peace NGOs and research-driven conclusions by authoritative institutions, the obvious centrality of alumni engagement is not matched by resource allocation in the field.

These results led ALLMEP to take determinative action with the creation of the Alumni Leadership Forum.

ALLMEP’s theory of change is rooted in people-to-people partnerships and focused on the work of our 110+ member organizations. ALLMEP strives to radically raise the capacity and visibility of the field, fostering cooperation, and creating a culture for ourselves and our members of best-in-class programming. Our ultimate goal is to create transformative social and political change through scaled collective impact as these NGOs work together to improve and strengthen Arab-Jewish and Israeli-Palestinian relations through people-to-people peacebuilding.

To advance these goals, ALLMEP has three interlocking strategic objectives.

1. People-to-People Peacebuilding:

ALLMEP’s growing network is comprised of over 100 Israeli and Palestinian member organizations doing grassroots, people-to-people peacebuilding in both the cross-border and shared society sectors. We work with our members to incentivize partnerships and cooperation, improve effectiveness, and make our community more than simply the sum of its parts.

2. Alumni Leadership:

Rooted in our theory of change is an understanding that Israelis and Palestinians who have passed through our members’ programs form a privileged constituency in the region who together can form the foundations of lasting peace. Following a year-long, full-scale needs assessment ALLMEP conducted of Israeli and Palestinian NGOs’ alumni programming, we have recently launched the pilot year of our Alumni Leadership Forum. Bringing together 21 alumni coordinators from our member organizations and others in the region, our aim is to ensure sector-wide improvement in the sphere of alumni engagement, ensuring that alumni are leveraging their experiences toward social and political transformation.

3. International Advocacy:

ALLMEP leverages a proven track record in advocating for government funding for people-to-people work, which has to date infused over $130 million in global governmental support to bolster regional peacebuilding projects. The flagship campaign in that effort is an International Fund for Israeli-Palestinian Peace, modeled on the International Fund for Ireland. As part of this project, in June of 2019, ALLMEP’s advocacy resulted in the introduction of the Partnership Fund for Peace Act, promising to annually inject $50 million of funding for people-to-people partnerships in the region. The Fund was introduced into Congress with bipartisan support in both the House and the Senate, and endorsed by an unprecedented coalition of supporting organizations, including both J Street and AIPAC. The UK government has publicly announced support for this effort, with significant progress made across Europe toward the same goal: an international fund with unprecedented resources dedicated to long-term peacebuilding in the region.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

ALLIANCE FOR MIDDLE EAST PEACE INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ALLIANCE FOR MIDDLE EAST PEACE INC

Board of directors
as of 11/24/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Father Josh Thomas

Kids4Peace

Avi Meyerstein

Jackson Lewis LLP

Deanna Armbruster

American Friends of Neve Shalom/Wahat al-Salam

Maysa Baransi-Siniora

All For Peace Radio

Giorgio Gomel

Former Economist at the Italian Central Bank

Joanna Goodwin Friedman

Goodwin Foundation

Michal Caspi

Olivestone Trust

Giorgio Gomel

Anne Kaplan Spar

Nivine Sandouka

Max (Bud) Shulman

Cravath, Swaine and Moore LLP

Ruth Jarmul

New York Stem Cell Foundation

Mark Zivin

Rafiq Masri

PALECO

Jean-Daniel Cohen

Danny Hakim

Budo for Peace

Charles Kremer

Access Leasing Corporation

Father Joshua Thomas

Kids4Peace

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/04/2019

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data