Faraja Fund Foundation

Charlotte, NC   |  https://www.farajaschool.org
This organization is a 501(c)(3) Private Nonoperating Foundation (This organization has notified the IRS of its intention to convert to a public charity, and the IRS has ruled that grantors and contributors may consider it a public charity for the purpose of making contributions to the organization.).

Mission

The Faraja Fund Foundation provides financial support for Faraja Primary School for children with physical disabilities in Tanzania, East Africa. The foundation equips Faraja School to provide high quality primary education, medical care and rehabilitation services, and an inclusive, loving environment.

Ruling year info

2007

Chairman

Mr. David Tolmie

Main address

8919 Park Rd Ste 249

Charlotte, NC 28210 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-5954310

NTEE code info

Education N.E.C. (B99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-PF.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In Tanzania, people with disabilities are sometimes considered a burden or a curse. This stigma can lead parents to keep their disabled children at home, away from the community, rather than sending them to school. In addition, most Tanzanian children walk several kilometers to and from school each day – a difficult if not impossible journey for children with cerebral palsy, spina bifida, or other mobility issues. Moreover, nearly all Tanzanian schools lack the infrastructure needed to accommodate disabled students. These societal and structural barriers make education inaccessible for most children with physical disabilities. Accessing medical care is another challenge for children with disabilities. Most Tanzanian families live hours away from specialized care. In addition, they cannot afford the procedures and equipment (wheelchairs, walking aids, prosthetics, and orthotics) their disabled children need.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Faraja Primary School

The Faraja Fund Foundation supports the work for Faraja Primary School in northern Tanzania. The school is located near the town of Sanya Juu, in the Tanzania's Kilimanjaro region.

Faraja Primary School was designed and built for students with physical disabilities. The campus is fully accessible for students who use wheelchairs and other mobility devices. The school's 95 students receive basic medical care (provided by a full-time clinical officer) and physical therapy (provided by a full-time physical therapist) on campus. Specialized treatment (including orthopedic surgeries), mobility equipment, prosthetics, and orthotics are also provided. Students receive therapy in the school's well equipped therapy room. Therapy continues outside on a new playground and outdoor therapeutic center.

Faraja students receive high-quality primary education at Faraja. Committed teachers and a first-rate learning environment (including a library and computer lab) create a culture of achievement and excellence. In 2020, Faraja students ranked first in their district on the national Primary School Leaving Exam (PSLE). Faraja's PSLE scores were among the top 3% of schools in the Kilimanjaro region and top 7% of schools in the country.

When students graduate from Faraja Primary School, the Faraja Fund Fundation continues to support their studies in secondary school, vocational training, and college. The goal is to help students reach their full academic and physical potential and empower them to live meaningful lives of dignity and contribution.

Population(s) Served
Children
Adolescents
People of African descent
People with physical disabilities
Extremely poor people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, People of African descent, People with physical disabilities, Extremely poor people

Related Program

Faraja Primary School

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of students served who earn passing grades in core subjects

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children, Adolescents, People of African descent, People with physical disabilities, Extremely poor people

Related Program

Faraja Primary School

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Faraja Primary School students take the Primary School Leaving Exam (PSLE) every other year. Faraja students have a 100% pass rate on this national examination.

Number of children receiving medical services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children, Adolescents, People of African descent, People with physical disabilities, Extremely poor people

Related Program

Faraja Primary School

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

100% of Faraja Primary School students receive medical care and rehabilitation. This includes orthopedic surgeries, physical therapy, mobility devices (i.e. wheelchairs), prosthetics, and orthotics.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Faraja Primary School provides high-quality primary education for children who would otherwise be left behind. The school’s excellent academic record has attracted public interest and admiration. By demonstrating that children with physical disabilities are as intelligent and capable as any other, Faraja joins a small but growing movement to recognize and celebrate the dignity and potential of people with disabilities in Tanzania.

In addition, the Faraja Fund Foundation funds students’ medical care and rehabilitation services, including orthopedic surgeries and mobility equipment. Faraja’s well-equipped physical therapy center and licensed physical therapist help students develop strength and confidence. The school also employs a qualified clinician who provides post-op care and attends to students’ daily and emergency medical needs.

While a good primary education is critical, children need further education to succeed. Unfortunately, most Tanzanian families cannot afford to send their children to secondary school or vocational training. Without additional support, education for most Faraja students would end with their Class 7 graduation.

The Faraja Fund Foundation supports Faraja graduates as they continue their education in secondary school and vocational training. The school’s post-primary education program includes career counseling, to match students’ interests and abilities with potential employment or entrepreneurship opportunities. The ultimate goal is transforming Faraja graduates into adults who can make a meaningful contribution to their families and their communities.

Goal 1: Faraja teachers will continue to provide outstanding primary school education. Faraja’s 2020 graduates earned high honors on the Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE). Faraja posted its best score ever, placing first among small primary schools in the district. Faraja’s performance ranked among the top 3% of schools in the Kilimanjaro region and the top 7% of schools nationally. This accomplishment sets the bar for academic excellence in 2021 and beyond.

Goal 2: Faraja will continue to provide post-primary education and career counseling for Faraja graduates. Sixty-five Faraja graduates are pursuing further education in secondary school and vocational training this year. Current Faraja students (Class 4 and Class 6) will be introduced to career counseling through a ten-day Career Camp, to be held during the school holiday in June. The school’s staff will also focus on building partnerships with local business owners who may be potential employers for Faraja graduates.

Goal 3: The school’s medical team will continue to provide and coordinate medical care, orthopedic surgeries, and rehabilitation services for Faraja students and graduates. Faraja recently welcomed a new class of 24 Kindergarten students. The school’s medical team is currently evaluating them and creating a treatment plan for each student. Onsite physical therapy, sports, and play improve students’ strength, coordination, and mobility. Faraja graduates also receive ongoing care while they attend secondary school and vocational training programs.

With the help of hundreds of generous donors, the Faraja Fund Foundation has funded the majority of Faraja Primary School's operating budget since the school's opening in 2001. Local partners, including the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Tanzania and the Tanzanian government, have also contributed funding, qualified teachers, and nutritious food for students.

Members of the Faraja Fund Foundation Board of Directors visit the school regularly and work closely with school staff to evaluate students' academic performance, implement new projects, and monitor finances. This close working relationship has been the key to Faraja Primary School's progress over the past twenty years.

Faraja’s academic performance is measured internally through teacher grading and externally through district examinations given at the end of each semester. Faraja’s Primary School Leaving Exam (PSLE) results have improved with each graduating class, and we expect this trend to continue.

The impact of Faraja’s post-primary education program is measured by a variety of factors. Completion of secondary school and vocational training programs, students’ academic performance, employment, and entrepreneurship are all indicators of success. Faraja’s staff tracks progress and offers ongoing support as graduates complete their post-primary education and enter the workforce.

The impact of Faraja’s medical and rehabilitation program continues to grow, resulting in greater mobility and independence for Faraja students and graduates. The best measurement of outcomes is the effective planning and execution of students’ individual treatment programs. Faraja’s clinician and physical therapist work hard to provide students with the best care available anywhere in Tanzania, and we therefore anticipate continued success in this area.

Financials

Faraja Fund Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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Faraja Fund Foundation

Board of directors
as of 8/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. David Tolmie

David Vermylen

John Tolmie

Paul Tolmie

Joann Tolmie

Debi Swanson

Mitch Engel

Curt Viebranz

Pat Bosse

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/01/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.