Health—General & Rehabilitative

LAURENS INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATION

Improving quality of life for differently-abled children and adults

aka LIFE   |   Gilbert, AZ   |  laurensinstitute.org

Mission

Improving quality of life for people affected by developmental disabilities through specialized, caring and affordable services.

Ruling year info

2007

CEO and Co-Founder

Margaret Travillion

President and Co-Founder

Carrie Reed

Main address

1305 South Gilbert Road

Gilbert, AZ 85296 USA

Show more addresses

EIN

20-5959213

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Health Treatment Facilities (Primarily Outpatient) (E30)

Specialized Education Institutions/Schools for Visually or Hearing Impaired, Learning Disabled (B28)

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There is a large need for services for those affected by developmental disabilities. There are not enough organizations currently in the State of Arizona, or anywhere for that matter, to meet the need. As well, the organizations that do exist often specialize in a particular disability or service and are not able to collaborate with the other people serving their clients. Even when done well, services are often only addressing a specific aspect of these people's needs, not the whole.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Music Therapy

Music therapy focuses on communication, socialization, motor movements, attention span, and emotional awareness through musical interventions. It encompasses musical elements such as structured time, rhythmical patterns, melodic inflection and emotional content to support the goals of speech therapy, occupational therapy, and habilitation in a live musical context that meets each child at his/her current functioning level.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Occupational therapy focuses on helping people achieve independence in all areas of their lives. In pediatrics, the occupational therapists are concerned with helping children with disabilities achieve independence in performing their daily activities or ‘occupations’. Occupations of a child include fine motor skills such as grasping a toy or a spoon, eye-hand coordination skills such as drawing or buttoning, visual-perceptual skills such as handwriting, self-help skills such as dressing and feeding, and sensory processing skills such as calming self down to sit at the table and do homework. These are some of the skills that OTs would typically help the child achieve and become independent with the therapy.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Physical therapy addresses physical impairments and functional limitations that impact the daily lives of those we serve. This includes problems with balance, coordination, strength, range of motion, gait (walking pattern); motor planning, proprioception (body awareness); and other functional skills such as riding a bike, and ball skills. PT’s also assist clients in attaining appropriate assistive devices such as walkers and wheelchairs, as well as foot orthotics to improve function and biomechanical alignment of joints. In pediatric physical therapy we use playful interventions in our sessions to make exercise fun and help children make progress in their gross motor development.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Speech/language therapy focuses on remediating speech, language, social communication and feeding disorders in both children and adults. A speech disorder involves difficulties producing sounds in words, whereas a language disorder involves difficulties understanding words/sentences and communicating wants and needs. Communication skills are enhanced by using pictures, signs, communication devices and/or words. Social communication disorders occur when a person has difficulties with the social use of verbal and non-verbal communication. Feeding disorders include swallowing difficulties, which occur following an illness, stroke or injury, and limited diets, which can be a result of sensory impairment and/or poor oral motor skills. Our skilled speech team supports the development of these skills through individual and group direct services, as well as consultation and collaboration with parents and providers.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

The Adult Day Program simulates a variety of environments, in which consumers will interact with outside of the program itself. The various components of our program focus on areas such as improving self-help skills, ability to complete domestic chores, opportunities to increase social skills, vocational skill development, and independent living skills. Our program allows individuals to practice these skills in an environment which is safe and non-threatening to them. Our goal is to provide an environment of opportunity for our consumers, an environment which will allow consumers to continue developing their skills and promote further independence for them. Everyone deserves an opportunity to better themselves and L.I.F.E.’s Adult Day Program offers the opportunity for just that.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

L.I.F.E.’s private school is a place where each and every child is considered an individual. L.I.F.E. educators approach each one of their unique needs as such. It is our greatest hope to create a place where each child’s needs – socially, emotionally and/or academically – can be addressed and supported on a individual basis. We hope never to see one of our students being “fit” into a classroom, but rather to have a classroom fit them.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Children and youth (0-19 years)

This department is designed to provide the opportunity for our consumers to receive specialized intensive Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) to address socially significant skills and behaviors. Our licensed Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) are highly trained to develop an all-inclusive evidenced based ABA program using a consumer centered approach which includes input from everyone on their treatment team. The BPS team hopes to support the entire organization through assessment, consultation, and training.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

L.I.F.E. provides community services to families with children and or adults who are differently-abled. Community services include Habilitation, development of skills; Respite, offering a break to parents or guardians with care from a specialized provider; and Attendant Care, providing services based on the specific needs of the child or adult.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric includes all donors who gave either money or goods to support our various services offered.

Number of customers reporting satisfaction with program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric comes from a voluntary survey given to all consumers. In 2019 we had 81 clients respond, making our 72 who responded with an overall positive satisfaction rating 86% of our reported result

Average number of days taken to respond to customers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric describes how long we take to return inquiries for service.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This describes the total number of clients we served across all programs.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric describes the total number of people who volunteered time to support our services, our campus, and our fundraising efforts.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric describes the total number of followers our organization's Facebook page has.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

To improve the quality of life of as many children and adults with developmental disabilities as possible, in as many different ways as possible, while continuing to educate our community on how to also best serve those that are affected by developmental disabilities, at as little cost as possible to those that we serve.

We provide a variety of different programs, each with its own specialized purpose and treatment plan, that collaboratively work to meet the individualized needs of each and every client that we see. We provide as many opportunities to each client as we can, allowing them to utilize all or some of these programs to meet their specific needs. We also staff at very low ratios, often one staff for each client, so that each person we see gets the attention they need to succeed, and we invest as much resource as we can into making those staff as high quality and as motivated as we can. We also strive to find as many outside funding sources as are available to alleviate the financial burden from the families that we serve.

We currently have 8 different programs: Speech, Music, Occupational and Physical Therapy, Behavioral Programming and Support, a Private School and an Adult Day Treatment program, all on a single campus, as well as staff that go into the community to provide additional habilitation, respite and attendant care services. Our staff are over 200 strong, and we operate on a 10 acre campus. We are constantly purchasing the best equipment and curriculum we can get our hands on, providing continuing education opportunities to our staff, and listening to the varying needs of those we serve so that we can continue to adapt and grow.

Each department has scientific data collection processes in place to measure and track the outcome of their specific goals and objectives. We use various softwares, as well as thorough filing procedures to ensure each client's goals and objectives are properly kept, maintained, updated and facilitated.

We have been in operations for 10 years, serving hundreds of families each year in the community surrounding our facility. We have obtained the facility and land that we feel is necessary to properly serve the best needs of our clients. We have expanded departments and services available over time to better serve our clients.<br/><br/>We have not been able to obtain certain treatment opportunities such as a hippo therapy arena, or group home for our adults, that we feel would best serve our clients. As well, we have filled all usable space on our campus. These are all things we are working to address, by constructing and expanding our campus.

Financials

LAURENS INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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LAURENS INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATION

Board of directors
as of 1/24/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Carrie Reed

Lauren's Institute for Education

Term: 2007 -


Board co-chair

Margaret Travillion

Lauren's Institute for Education

Term: 2007 -

Margaret Travillion

Lauren's Institute for Education

Barbara Burgess

Carrie Reed

Lauren's Institute for Education

Tony Miller

Rich Maston

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Keywords

Therapeutic, Educational and Other Services for children and adults with developmental disabilities