LAURENS INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATION

Improving quality of life for differently-abled children and adults

aka LIFE   |   Gilbert, AZ   |  laurensinstitute.org

Mission

Improving quality of life for people affected by developmental disabilities through specialized, caring and affordable services.

Ruling year info

2007

CEO and Co-Founder

Margaret Travillion

President and Co-Founder

Carrie Reed

Main address

1305 South Gilbert Road

Gilbert, AZ 85296 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-5959213

NTEE code info

Health Treatment Facilities (Primarily Outpatient) (E30)

Specialized Education Institutions/Schools for Visually or Hearing Impaired, Learning Disabled (B28)

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There is a large need for services for those affected by developmental disabilities. There are not enough organizations currently in the State of Arizona, or anywhere for that matter, to meet the need. As well, the organizations that do exist often specialize in a particular disability or service and are not able to collaborate with the other people serving their clients. Even when done well, services are often only addressing a specific aspect of these people's needs, not the whole.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Music Therapy

Music therapy addresses functional goals in the areas of communication, socialization, motor movements, attention span, and emotional awareness through use of musical interventions such as creating, singing, moving to, and/or listening to music. For example, for a consumer with a goal to increase their number of spoken words, the music therapist may use songs that promote verbal participation at specific times in a song.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Occupational therapists look at what elements support or hinder successful participation for a consumer, which often includes the environment, sensory processing, behavior, motor skills, language, and cognitive skill development. They then create individualized activities for each consumer to help them achieve independence and well-being. For example, they may work on hand muscle strengthening using putty so that a consumer can successfully button a shirt.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Physical therapy helps consumers improve in the areas of gross motor skills. Physical therapists look at whether a consumer is functioning at age-appropriate level in physical skills such as mobility, coordination, and strength and then determine interventions to help address areas of concern. For example, they may use therapy ball activities to strengthen a consumer’s core muscles so that they can learn to roll or maintain their balance when riding a bike.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Speech/language therapy focuses on remediating speech, language, and social communication. A speech disorder involves difficulties producing sounds in words, whereas a language disorder involves difficulties understanding words/sentences and communicating wants and needs. For example, a speech therapist may practice with a consumer on different ways to introduce themselves to others if they have a goal of improved social communication.

Population(s) Served

Our DTE department includes multiple programs funded by the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) including our adult day treatment program, after school program, summer program, transition to employment program, and our group supported employment program.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

We have classrooms that support students with a wide array of cognitive, physical, and emotional needs from ages 3-21. We develop individualized learning plans and use research supported curriculum. Many of our students receive on-site therapy and behavior support and all our departments work together in a transdisciplinary approach. We are also fortunate to have a beautiful campus and multiple clinical enhancement programs and environments. We have assistive technology services, adaptive music, adaptive art, and adaptive physical education which are run by our clinical enhancements team. We also have outreach programming that includes partnerships with local academic institutions to assist in education of students. We are proud to have received a 5-year accreditation in 2021 from Cognia.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Children and youth

Our Behavioral Programming and Support (BPS) department provides comprehensive Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) and Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention (EIBI) services using the most up-to-date best practices in the field of behavior analysis. We utilize a number of different behavioral strategies tailored to each individual consumer. We support consumers in our academy as well as those from the community. We are also a BHCOE accredited organization.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

L.I.F.E. offers consumers and their families several different options to receive care services in-home and community including habilitation (HAH), respite (RSP), and attendant care (ATC). Habilitation consists of a direct support professional (DSP) providing teaching methods to help a consumer be more independent. Respite is involves a DSP providing supervision and care for a consumer for short amounts of time to provide a break for regular caregivers. Attendant care includes a DSP assisting a consumer with personal hygiene tasks (e.g., dressing, brushing teeth, toileting) and activities of daily living (e.g., eating, housekeeping chores) with the goal to assist a consumer in maintaining their health and healthy living conditions.

Population(s) Served

Feeding therapy is provided by occupational therapists or assistants or speech therapists or assistants that have obtained additional training in the specialty of feeding therapy. These therapists use carefully chosen interventions to address concerns such as only eating a very limited number or type of food and/or to improve oral motor skills to reduce concerns like gagging, choking, or aspiration.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
People with disabilities

Where we work

Accreditations

Cognia 5 year Private School Certificate of Accredidation 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric includes all donors who gave either money or goods to support our various services offered.

Number of customers reporting satisfaction with program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric comes from a voluntary survey given to all consumers. In 2021 we had 79 clients respond, making our 74 who responded with an overall positive satisfaction rating 94% of our reported result

Average number of days taken to respond to customers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric describes how long we take to return inquiries for service.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This describes the total number of clients we served across all programs.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric describes the total number of people who volunteered time to support our services, our campus, and our fundraising efforts.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric describes the total number of followers our organization's Facebook page has.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To improve the quality of life of as many children and adults with developmental disabilities as possible, in as many different ways as possible, while continuing to educate our community on how to also best serve those that are affected by developmental disabilities, at as little cost as possible to those that we serve.

We provide a variety of different programs, each with its own specialized purpose and treatment plan, that collaboratively work to meet the individualized needs of each and every client that we see. We provide as many opportunities to each client as we can, allowing them to utilize all or some of these programs to meet their specific needs. We also staff at very low ratios, often one staff for each client, so that each person we see gets the attention they need to succeed, and we invest as much resource as we can into making those staff as high quality and as motivated as we can. We also strive to find as many outside funding sources as are available to alleviate the financial burden from the families that we serve.

We currently have 8 different programs: Speech, Music, Occupational and Physical Therapy, Behavioral Programming and Support, a Private School and an Adult Day Treatment program, all on a single campus, as well as staff that go into the community to provide additional habilitation, respite and attendant care services. Our staff are over 200 strong, and we operate on a 10 acre campus. We are constantly purchasing the best equipment and curriculum we can get our hands on, providing continuing education opportunities to our staff, and listening to the varying needs of those we serve so that we can continue to adapt and grow.

We have been in operations for 10 years, serving hundreds of families each year in the community surrounding our facility. We have obtained the facility and land that we feel is necessary to properly serve the best needs of our clients. We have expanded departments and services available over time to better serve our clients.

We have not been able to obtain certain treatment opportunities such as a hippo therapy arena, or group home for our adults, that we feel would best serve our clients. As well, we have filled all usable space on our campus. These are all things we are working to address, by constructing and expanding our campus.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

LAURENS INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

LAURENS INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATION

Board of directors
as of 03/28/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Carrie Reed

Lauren's Institute for Education

Term: 2007 -


Board co-chair

Margaret Travillion

Lauren's Institute for Education

Term: 2007 -

Margaret Travillion

Lauren's Institute for Education

Barbara Burgess

Carrie Reed

Lauren's Institute for Education

Tony Miller

Rich Maston

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/28/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability