Wuqu' Kawoq | Maya Health Alliance

aka Wuqu' Kawoq   |   Bethel, VT   |  www.wuqukawoq.org

Mission

Wuqu' Kawoq | Maya Health Alliance is a non-governmental organization dedicated to improving the health of Mayan communities in rural Guatemala. We believe that everyone – no matter where they were born or what language they speak–should have the highest quality health care.

Ruling year info

2007

Principal Officer

Anne Kraemer Diaz

Chief Medical Officer

Dr. Peter Rohloff

Main address

PO Box 91 Russell Rohloff

Bethel, VT 05032 USA

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EIN

20-8741625

NTEE code info

Community Health Systems (E21)

Digestive Diseases, Disorders (G70)

Other Medical Research N.E.C. (H99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Guatemala is one of the most unequal nations in the world. The majority of the population are indigenous Maya, who shoulder the brunt of this inequality. They are one of the most impoverished populations in the Western hemisphere. Barriers like language, transportation, distance, cost, lack of education, mistrust, and fear make health care inaccessible to many rural indigenous Guatemalans.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Clean Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Where we have primary care programs, we also work to provide clean water and other related services.
To prevent parasitic and diarrheal diseases, we make sure communities have access clean water. We have installed and maintained thousands of innovative point-of-use water systems.
We also provide education for mothers and families on topics related to maternal and child health (MCH) and water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH).
We work to support our communities for long term change. We work together with clean water technicians as well as the local leaders, schools, and community members to implement our clean water initiative, and incorporate long-term education initiatives.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

We are committed to making primary health care better in rural Guatemala. We start by partnering with indigenous communities to identify health needs. We then deliver primary care to meet our patients' expectations and demands: linkage to referral care and treatment, education, and long-term commitment to patients.

Population(s) Served
Families
Indigenous peoples

Our women's health program is comprehensive. In addition to primary care for all women, we offer high-quality services including family planning, cancer screening and treatment, pregnancy care, and management of sexually transmitted infections.
We have developed specific expertise in the screening, diagnosis, referral, and treatment of cervical cancer, which is a leading cause of death in Guatemala.
Our obstetrics initiatives focus on reducing maternal mortality through high-quality prenatal care, midwife education, and using new technology. To make childbirth safer, we’ve partnered with many local and global leaders such as Planned Parenthood International, ACOTCHI (a cooperative of indigenous midwives), and the National Institutes of Health.
The foundation of our women’s health education program is Mayan language women’s health education. These classes help women have healthier pregnancies, children, and lives.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Economically disadvantaged people

We use the term “The Complete Child” to refer to the fact that children in Guatemala have health needs that go beyond malnutrition. Our child health programs integrate nutrition, education, women’s health, and pediatric services.
All of our work is carried out in a way that aligns with the language and culture of the community.
Children in our affiliated communities sometimes require high-level pediatric care, and we have experience caring for complex pediatric conditions such as cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, seizure disorders, child cancers, surgical cases, and more.
Our organization is known as a leader in the field of nutrition, and we frequently train other organizations in Guatemala on how to implement similar programs. We also conduct innovative research funded by prestigious institutions like Grand Challenges Canada.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Infants and toddlers

Our approach to chronic disease care is to integrate high-quality clinical care with health education–all in a patient’s language and culture.
In our chronic disease work, we have become experts in the management of adult and pediatric diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, cancer, chronic kidney disease, seizure disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, and other conditions. To complement our chronic disease work, we continue to develop screening programs.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses
Economically disadvantaged people

We have pioneered an innovative referral system to bridge the urban-rural divide in Guatemala. We provide deliver extremely complex medical care to patients in very remote rural communities. We have successfully treated many complicated medical conditions in our referral program, including congenital heart disease, inborn errors of metabolism, end-stage kidney disease, complex surgical cases, cancer, and more.
Our team of case managers all speak Mayan languages and do whatever it takes to overcome the barriers to health care for our patients.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Indigenous peoples

Where we work

Accreditations

Audit 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of instances of maternal complications during hospitalized labor and delivery

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Women's Health

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Midwives attended to 49 cases with serious complications before and after birth & referred to hospital care as needed. All of the mothers and children survived, reflecting substantial improvement.

Number of patients maintaining adequate blood glucose

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples

Related Program

Chronic Disease Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We provide monitoring and education to help patients with diabetes manage their condition at home.

Number of patient visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

number of home visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our community health workers made more than 10,000 visits to patients' homes in 2019.

number of women receiving reproductive health care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Women's Health

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We provided reproductive health care for 5,000 women and cervical cancer screenings for 1,500 women in 2019.

Number of home visits for nutrition counseling.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, People of Central American descent, Indigenous peoples, Extremely poor people

Related Program

The Complete Child: Health, Nutrition, and Early Child Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Patients in our Family-Centered Nutrition program are enrolled for a minimum of six months. Home visits include growth monitoring, in-home nutrition counseling, and vitamin and food supplements.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Wuqu' Kawoq | Maya Health Alliance recognizes that even in this time of amazing medical discovery, so many of the poor and sick all over the world cannot access the medical resources that could make them well. Our work aims to overcome these barriers to health, so that all can have the highest quality of healthcare.

At our organization, we believe there is no “one size fits all" healthcare system. That is why we adjust and respond to the needs of each of our patients. We provide high-quality, personalized medical care in the Mayan languages of our patients. We also collaborate on numerous projects with language researchers, grass-roots organizations, and government agencies who champion the use of indigenous languages. By adapting to local cultures and using indigenous languages we create an environment where every voice is heard.

Our organization has built a solid base that allows us to reach all those who are locked out of their health care systems. Our staff are fluent in local Mayan languages, in order to deliver culturally-relevant health care. We use our network of 11 clinics as well as community outreach through home visits to bring access directly to patients. We have a leadership team that maintains strong links to the on-the-ground work, and are supported by a board of directors and advisors that include experts in medicine, anthropology, linguistics, law, business, and finance. Wuqu' Kawoq | Maya Health Alliance has committed partners and sponsors including governmental and non-governmental organizations. We maintain a cross-disciplinary, cutting-edge research program that draws from many academic areas and collaborate with many national and international research partners, as well as are deeply committed to building local research capacity so that research in Guatemala reflects real-world realities.

To date, Wuqu' Kawoq has established 11 community health and nutritional clinic sites in indigenous communities in rural Guatemala. We perform more than 20,000 patient visits per year, and have created a network of culturally- and linguistically-informed health workers to deliver this care. There has been a 40% reduction in child malnutrition in the areas in which we work, and more than 700 women have been educated in nutrition and women's health. We continue to strive for more impact, and are expanding the number of communities and breadth of services we offer. Through ongoing research projects, such as the development of our smartphone application, the midwives we work with are able to monitor mothers' and babies' health and relay that information to the Wuqu' Kawoq medical team. This makes it possible to identify high-risk pregnancies that may require a hospital visit. These efforts have contributed to a 50% reduction in infant mortality across our communities.

Financials

Wuqu' Kawoq | Maya Health Alliance
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Wuqu' Kawoq | Maya Health Alliance

Board of directors
as of 9/15/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Brent Henderson

University of Florida

Term: 2013 - 2021

Russell Rohloff

Pathways Consulting

Brent Henderson

University of Florida

Anne Kraemer Díaz

Wuqu' Kawoq

Peter Rohloff

Brigham and Women's Hospital

Mark Doerr

Attorney

Claire Melvin

Attorney

Tom Melvin

Financial Analyst

Chis Davies

Property Manager

Patrick Jennings

Health Care Consultant

Kara Andrade

PhD Candidate

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/11/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/26/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.