AMANI WOMEN CENTER

"Stitching Lives Together"

aka Amani Sewing Academy / Johari Africa   |   Clarkston, GA   |  www.amaniwomencenter.org

Mission

Amani Women Center (AWC) enriches the lives of refugee communities in Georgia and empowers them in their new environment by providing educational programs, and a variety of social services. Our mission is to empower refugee women through culturally-tailored programs and provide services that contribute to their economic security and overall wellbeing. AWC fills this important gap by providing 3 unique programs utilizing a holistic approach designed to build and sustain healthy families within the home and the community. • Amani Sewing Academy (AWC) - Workforce Development & Life Skills • Healthy Families Program (HFP) - Support Services (Civic & Social) • Leadership Program - (ACALP) - Amani Community Ambassadors.

Notes from the nonprofit

Imagine what it’s like to flee your home in fear. To arrive in a new country with nothing but your life. At Amani Women Center (AWC) we provide practical support and guidance through various programs and workshops for refugee women here in the United States and parts of Africa. AWC believes in the value of creating trusting relationships on a person-to-person basis to identify community needs and obstacles to develop effective solutions that empower and strengthen the community. We continue to show commitment by effectively and efficiently providing tailored programming (e.g. our sewing academy) and services through our ethnically diverse team that is reflective of the community we serve.

Ruling year info

2007

President/ED

Ms Doris K Mukangu

Main address

3777 Church Street 5140 Memorial College Ave

Clarkston, GA 30021 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

20-8795120

NTEE code info

Ethnic/Immigrant Services (P84)

Economic Development (S30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our organization is meeting a unique need of providing culturally sensitive empowerment programs that lead to self-sufficiency for refugee families in the metro Atlanta region. There's a high rate of unemployment among refugee women due to factors such as language barriers, access to transportation and skills. Amani Sewing Academy provides the training to meet this need. We are helping bridge the gap between the number of workers skilled in sewing and the abundant jobs available in the field. Sewing gives the City of Clarkston refugees new job skills. Graduates from the program are also able to transit into sole proprietorship, working from home sewing for their respective communities, or earn livable wages working at various sewing factories. Currently, students in the program are able to earn income from contractual piecework. Our intent is to empower and teach a profession they can be proud of. How to help Amani Women Center? 1. Volunteer 2. Make a donation 3. Sponsor a student.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

• Amani Sewing Academy (ASA) - Workforce Development / Empowerment Program)

This is a life-skills program that utilizes a holistic approach in a safe space with wrap-around services focusing on education and wellbeing. The program provides 450 hours of training per year, teaching, empowering, and preparing students (About 50 women per year) to be workforce ready. They graduate with certification and are gifted with a new sewing machine. They join the workforce, become Certified sewing machine operators earning livable wages, start their own entrepreneurial home business, work under Johari Africa – AWC’s social enterprise, further their training to become instructors or an AWC Community Ambassador. ASA is a pathway to economic empowerment, security, and self-reliance for a limited English proficiency population.

Population(s) Served

The Healthy Families Program provides a safe space where refugee women come to be natured mentally, physically and spiritually. We are “Stitching Lives Together”. The program helps them increase their ability to navigate social services, civic education, counseling, job placement, learn financial literacy skills, close gap the digital divide, achieve and build healthy relationships within the family including addressing Domestic Violence Prevention, and Sexual Assault – Healing under a supportive case management year round service. In response to Covid-19, HFP connected refugees to resources such as Covid-19 testing centers, food delivery, rent and utility assistance, processing Medicaid, CAPS and SNAP applications. AWC initiated a Covid-19 emergency fund in response to the needs of the community and program participants. Conducted numerous vaccine awareness events, campaigns, and distributed essentials such as diapers, wipes, hygiene supplies, sanitizers, and facial masks.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships
Social and economic status

AWC Community Ambassador program for women, men, and youth receive training and skills to take on leadership roles in their respective communities. AWC language services (Translation and Interpretation) are manned by the community ambassadors serving as advocates, they provide an added value to refugee women calling in to get help. A culturally competent team that is well versed in cultural nuances. They provide both oral interpretation services and written translation services in over 10 languages. The ACA team help the community apply for social services, facilitate workshops, engage in outreach and mobilization activities. They are trusted voices that have undergone professional training and received certifications in various disciplines including. They are front-line advocates, navigators, and interviewers. They are best equipped to address cultural nuances. AWC ambassadors help these various groups tap into resources that are available to them.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships
Social and economic status
Women and girls
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships
Social and economic status

Where we work

Accreditations

EIIG - Emory Impact Investment Group 2020

Awards

EMPOWER AWARD 2020

GCADV-Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence

Affiliations & memberships

Clarkston Community Health Center 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients still enrolled after the first week of training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

• Amani Sewing Academy (ASA) - Workforce Development / Empowerment Program)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of student enrollment decreased in 2020 due to Covid-19 pandemic concerns and safety.

Number of job skills training courses/workshops conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

• Healthy Families Program (HFP) - Support Services)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Covid-19 conversations and workshops. Support services - emergency asistance Community education and awareness drives. Job skills training and workshops.

Number of diversity training courses conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Health

Related Program

• Leadership Program - (ACALP) - Amani Community Ambassadors

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Amani Community Ambassador program for women, men, and youth receive training and skills to take on leadership roles in their respective communities.

Number of students enrolled in service-learning courses

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Work status and occupations, Social and economic status

Related Program

• Amani Sewing Academy (ASA) - Workforce Development / Empowerment Program)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Attendance monitoring. Students that graduate. Graduates employed in the workforce and graduates that have started their own home business.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Ethnic and racial groups, Social and economic status, Family relationships, Work status and occupations

Related Program

• Amani Sewing Academy (ASA) - Workforce Development / Empowerment Program)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

9 are employed and 14 have started their own home business and 5 are in advanced classes training to become certified instructors.

Number of students at or above a 90% attendance rate

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

• Amani Sewing Academy (ASA) - Workforce Development / Empowerment Program)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Several women have transportation challenges and we could really benefit from having a vehicle to transport the women to and from their homes.

Hours of consulting time accessed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

• Healthy Families Program (HFP) - Support Services)

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Different activities take place at AWC. We provide wrap-around services to refugee women to help them navigate social services, healthcare system, school system and language services.

Hours of tutoring administered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

• Amani Sewing Academy (ASA) - Workforce Development / Empowerment Program)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

AWC’s weekly in-person sewing classes pivoted to virtual platforms, (Zoom) and smartphone messaging and hotline. Adding more hours and teaching, assignments.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our organization aims to empower refugee families with life skills and work skills that empower them to be productive members of their families and their communities. The supplementary income of contractual work from our sewing program enables these women to sustain their respective homes and ultimately leads to self-sufficiency and their wellbeing.

• Providing linguistically appropriate services and programs.
• Providing culturally appropriate health and life skills workshops.
• Providing culturally sensitive education and counseling.

• Our staff is representative of the different ethnicities that we serve and are well versed in the cultural nuances.
• Our staff is bicultural and multi-lingual.
• Our staff is highly credentialed in the different services that we provide.
• Our organization provides a safe space in the hub of the community thus is easily accessible.

• We have implemented a helpline to accommodate the growing needs in the community. Most of the needs were Covid-19 emergencies such as rent assistance and utilities.
• Provided support for over 1,200 beneficiaries. Helped 800 families avoid evictions and utility termination.
• Mobilized and interviewed by phone over 500 refugees for Women Health Needs Study. Increased applications for welfare benefits, increased Covid awareness, testing, hygiene, and vaccines.
• We see the impact every day, by the end of 2020-2021, we served over 55 women, 24 graduated from the program and were awarded new sewing machines. We presented these proud resilient women, each with a certificate of completion. As these women have gained employment and shared their success with similar women the demand for our services continues to increase. The majority of the women have started their own home business, others are doing contractual piece work from home, and some are training to become instructors at AWC. 85% of the women report they have improved their speaking and personal coping skills as a result of education and working with our program. 80% of the women report they have achieved a level of economic security through achieving their personal goals for training, employment, and/or starting a business.
• We have also expanded the sewing academy to add 28 new students and are planning on adding 30 more by 2022.
• In response to Covid-19, AWC had to pivot and provide more direct services. Covid-19 emergency assistance and related support services. Connecting refugees to resources such as Covid-19 testing centers, food delivery, rent and utility assistance, processing Medicaid, and SNAP applications.
• AWC initiated a Covid-19 emergency fund under the Healthy Families Program in response to the needs of the community and program participants. Conducted numerous vaccine awareness events, campaigns, and distributed essentials such as diapers, wipes, hygiene supplies, food, sanitizers, and facial masks.
• Established a helpline in 10 different languages that community members can dial into and get help navigating the numerous resources available. This is supported by AWC Community Ambassadors. Mothers and program participants receive vital public health information and advice from voices they trust and in languages, they could understand.
• AWC educated and emphasized the importance of wearing masks, washing hands, and social distancing. Culturally tailored and linguistically appropriate messaging on covid-19 prevention. PSA's were presented via various messaging platforms. Flyers were designed and translated in over 10 different languages. AWC Ambassadors offered interpretation and information on screening sites, symptoms to look for, measures to take if confirmed positive, and where to get help.
• AWC administered emergency funding from the City of Clarkston for childcare services. AWC ambassadors assisted the qualified qualified recipients.




How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    AWC clients are refugees or immigrant women, 16 years or older with limited English proficiency. Approximately 80% of the women that participate in our programs are considered low-income and are at or below 100% of the national poverty line. More than 90% have children, 50% are married and 50% are single. 90% are from Africa, 5% are from Asia, and 5% are from the Middle East. Currently, the majority of refugee women we are serving come from Somalia, Sudan, Sierra Leone, Eritrea, Ethiopia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Afghanistan, Bhutan, and Burma.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Class conversations, meetings and workshops,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    AWC responded to feedback from the community requesting weekend sewing classes for women who are not available during the week. We considered their concern and implemented morning and afternoon classes on Saturdays. This added to personnel costs but it was worth it.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    • It improved and enhanced the relationship. • It empowered them. Most of the Refugee women say they feel more confident • They said they felt a sense of ownership and an extension of our vision. • Inclusion has become part of our operational decisions. Our programs are having a positive impact on their wellbeing and outlook, and they have seen improvements in their relationships at home and beyond! Feedbacks: Gotten a job, Registered to vote, Applied for U.S. Citizen, Learned about U.S. culture Made new friends, Willing to try counseling, Helped their communities. 95% LEARNED SEWING & JOB READINESS 89% HAVE HEALTHIER FAMILIES & FELT SUPPORTED 84% IMPROVED SPEAKING & COPING SKILLS 82% ACHIEVED FINANCIAL & DIGITAL LITERACY SKILLS

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

AMANI WOMEN CENTER
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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AMANI WOMEN CENTER

Board of directors
as of 11/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Dr. Tanae Acolatse

President, TEW Accounting & Consulting Services

Sando Karneh

Morgan Stanley

Dr. Catherine Palmer

Gwinnett Medical

Dr. Jacqueline Walker

Retired

Sharifa Addae

Retired

Joan Kimenyi

United Postal Service

Shelly Kacergis

Retired

Bonnie O'Neill

Retired

Valerie Mills

City of Atlanta

Sandy Teepen

Sandies Label

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/29/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Transgender
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/19/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.