Center for Global Initiatives, Inc.

aka C.G.I.   |   Naperville, IL   |  http://CenterForGlobalInitiatives.org

Mission

The mission of the Center for Global Initiatives is to create self-sustaining programs that improve access to healthcare in underserved communities throughout the world.

Ruling year info

2008

Founding Director

Dr. Chris Stout

Main address

3651 White Eagle Drive

Naperville, IL 60564 USA

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EIN

20-8879339

NTEE code info

Public Health Program (E70)

AIDS (G81)

Management & Technical Assistance (G02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The mission of the Center for Global Initiatives is to help in the creation of self-sustaining programs that improve access to healthcare in underserved communities throughout the world.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

THRIVE: Tanzanian Health & Resilience Initiative Valuing Education

Tanzania: THRIVE: Tanzanian Health & Resilience Initiative Valuing Education The we co-founded a kindergarten in 2005 and are expanding our scope in THRIVE. We are using education as a basis for developing resilience of the orphans as well as those providing healthcare in the neighboring clinic/hospital. We are developing programs for local nursing students and orphan children in collaboration with local doctors, nurses, and staff. We have a particular focus on counseling to people with HIV infection and AIDS in Moshi. The ages of children are between 3 to 12 years. The name of the hospital is Huruma Designated Hospital and is in Kilimanjaro Region in Rombo District. The Primary illness of patients in our hospital are Malaria, T.B, Pneumonia, Immunosupression, Diabetes, and Hypertension. Volume is >400 patients annually.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with diseases and illnesses

Where we work

Awards

International Humanitarian Award 2004

American Psychological Association

Humanitarian Award 2006

Illinois Psychological Association

Humanitarian Award 2008

Psychologists for Social Responsibility

Affiliations & memberships

American Psychological Association 2007

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who plan to attend post-secondary education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

THRIVE: Tanzanian Health & Resilience Initiative Valuing Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We paid school fees for these students.

Provision of medical equipment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

THRIVE: Tanzanian Health & Resilience Initiative Valuing Education

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Provision of an ambulance, US$30,000 in 2019

Reduction of morbidity and mortality

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

THRIVE: Tanzanian Health & Resilience Initiative Valuing Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Number treated for malaria whose medication care we paid for (2016). Various illnesses and conditions in later years.

Aid in transition from kindergarten to primary education.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

THRIVE: Tanzanian Health & Resilience Initiative Valuing Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

40 kindergarten children were able to join primary school.

Ain in children going to kindergarten.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

THRIVE: Tanzanian Health & Resilience Initiative Valuing Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

21 new students were able to be registered into the kindergarten.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Conceptually, we see the problem we address as healthcare services, sciences, systems, education, and research all suffer from disconnections — globally and locally, biologically and behaviorally, training and practice. Health inequities are global in scale; however it is the Center's philosophy to successfully address these injustices through multiple, smaller scale projects, with a coordinated focus and outcome accountability.

Until now, there has not been a truly integrated Center that is at once mindful of all the complex aspects of global health inequities while also focused on small, outcomes oriented projects that are agile, responsive, and empowering in clinical, training, and research domains. It is the goal of the Center to "To change the world, one patient at a time." We tend to work in places where if we were not operating, there would be no services.

Generally we do this by:
1. Serving as an incubator for new initiatives that creatively solve health care inequities throughout the world.
2. Acting as a collaborator with individuals and organizations in developing and launching projects that address the needs of medically impoverished populations.
3. Functioning as a facilitator in directing public and private resources towards programs aimed at improving health.
4. Working as an educator to provide new information and tools to empower others.

The Most Unique Aspects of the Center
1. We serve as a "hothouse" for new projects. We help to nurture, grow, and launch them until self sustaining.
2. After a project has taken hold, we will continue to serve as pro bono consultants as long as necessary, along with fulfilling any other needs—materials, medicines, case consultation, introductions...
3. 95% of our projects are the result of being invited to do the work. When we are not a good fit, we recommend a more suitable organization.
4. As best we can, depending on the project, we seek to blend primary care, behavioral health and public health into an ultimately self-sustaining, outcomes accountable, culturally consonant result.

It's easy to want to measure success via the number of zeroes and commas in a bank account or total square footage of mansions/villas owned, or the number of Italian sports cars in the garage or polo ponies in the stable. But in my line of work, the bottom line numbers I equate with success are the number of lives saved and/or changed—and I have found that can be accomplished with a high ROI.

The context for this is through my role as Founding Director of the Center for Global Initiatives. Our mission is to help in the creation of self-sustaining programs that improve access to healthcare in under-served communities throughout the world. We go about this in by various means—serving as an incubator for new initiatives that creatively solve healthcare inequities, acting as a collaborator with individuals and organizations in developing, and launching projects that address the needs of medically impoverished populations, functioning as a facilitator in directing public and private resources toward programs aimed at improving health, and working as an educator to provide new information and tools to empower others.Our first project was working with children in Tanzania who had lost their parents to AIDS. I had never really thought about how, or even if, these children went to school. I learned that they did not. Our in-country colleague believed their chances for a better life were improved if they could read and had knowledge-based skills as well as labor-based training. I agreed and we set forth on creating a modest school.

The “cost" was $8.90 in postage to mail a packet of materials that a group of volunteers from the Center for Global Initiatives compiled for a curriculum and supporting documents. The volunteers were elementary education experts—teachers, principals, developmental experts, etc. Our colleague in Tanzania tweaked the materials to be synthetic and consonant with cultural norms and traditions, and submitted the result to the Ministry of Education who approved it. We continue to be on-call for any help we can give, and always free of charge. We conduct fundraisers for them and are active in fiscally supporting the children in any and all ways under our colleague's watchful and measured stewardship.

We were able to procure the proper medications needed and at follow-up we had been able to treat and thus help prevent over 4,100 people from dying of malaria. Twenty-eight percent of those infected were children under the age of five — an even more vulnerable group. When calculating the cost, it averaged out to... 73 cents a life. That was simply amazing.

Financials

Center for Global Initiatives, Inc.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Center for Global Initiatives, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 8/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Dale Galassie

No affiliation, retired Director Health Depratment

Dan Roller, PsyD

Private Practice

Dale Galassie, MA, MA

Director Lake Co. Health Dept, ret.

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/01/2019

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/01/2019

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.