Rescue Mission of Trenton

See potential.

Trenton, NJ   |  www.rescuemissionoftrenton.org

Mission

The Rescue Mission of Trenton is the agency in the City of Trenton that serves the truly needy men and women who have no place to turn for shelter, food, and clothing. The Mission provides a safe, clean, warm refuge for those who are homeless, hungry, transient, and addicted. The Mission provides services and counseling to encourage individuals to reach their greatest potential. The Mission creates an environment where one can live with dignity, build self-esteem, and experience love, responsibility, and hope.

Ruling year info

1951

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Barrett Young

Main address

P.O. Box 790 98 Carroll Street

Trenton, NJ 08605-0790 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

21-0656182

NTEE code info

Half-Way House (Short-Term Residential Care) (P72)

Other Housing, Shelter N.E.C. (L99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our work focuses on helping individuals overcome the conditions in which they have lived, which have become known as “Social Determinants of Health.” Those conditions are brutal, including homelessness, joblessness, substance use disorder, co-occurring disorders, lack of educational opportunities, unequal access to medical and mental healthcare, economic poverty and regrettable choices for which they bear responsibility. For more than a century, The Mission has provided a refuge for those with nowhere else to turn. Historically, our Emergency Shelter has been a place where individuals can come in off the streets, get cleaned up, have a warm meal, a safe place to spend the night, and a refuge where they are treated with the care and respect they deserve. The Mission has evolved to serve as a central intake system for individuals who need medical care, behavioral health care, substance use disorder counseling, vocational development, and assistance with housing.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Behavioral Health Center

Licensed by the State of New Jersey, Division of Mental Health & Addiction Services, The Mission's Behavioral Health Center provides residential addiction treatment to homeless, indigent clients and those with specific legal issues.

A full array of services are offered including group and individual counseling, medical evaluation and referral, educational and vocational assistance, meals and transportation.

Our Behavioral Health Center has three special units Long-term, Halfway House, and Extended Care.

Population(s) Served
Adults

When someone is ready to live on his or her own, we provide case management services to help that individual navigate the complex requirements necessary for someone who was previously homeless to secure housing.

Last year, through working with our community partners, we were able to help 153 previously homeless individuals secure housing.

In addition, as part of our commitment to end homelessness, The Mission now owns five houses and one apartment building, which can provide a home for 43 individuals.

Last year, we oversaw the reconstruction of a historic home on South Clinton Avenue in Trenton, which had long been ransacked, boarded-up, and abandoned. Now renovated to its previous state, this elegant house is the home of five formerly homeless women. Our commitment came from seeing the number of homeless women seeking food and shelter at The Mission increase by 25 percent in the past eight years. “Many of these women are victims of domestic violence,” said Barrett Young, The Mission’s Chief Operating Officer. “We knew we had to do something,” he added. “That’s how we always begin.”

Population(s) Served
Adults

For over a century, whenever someone has knocked on our shelter’s door, all we ask were just two questions: “What’s your name?” and “Are you hungry?”

Then, over a shared meal, our dedicated and talented staff help each homeless individual start to map out a path for “What’s next?”

Last year, 1,018 individuals knocked on our Shelter’s door, who stayed with us for over 38,005 nights, and were served over 71,992 meals.

Each individual is offered a full range of professional case management services, without consideration of ability to pay, including healthcare, behavioral health counseling, addiction treatment, financial assistance – and last year we were able to help 153 previously homeless individuals obtain housing.

We are keenly aware that behind each of those stark numbers is a very personal story.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

The Outpatient Program offers a full range Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services licensed Outpatient and Intensive Outpatient substance abuse treatment for men and women including individual assessment, group counseling sessions, and addiction education. Referrals for medical, behavioral healthcare and other services are made as appropriate.

Anyone seeking outpatient substance abuse treatment is welcome. Services are provided to men and women from all walks of life and are based on an affordable sliding fee scale.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people using homeless shelter per year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Unemployed people, Ethnic and racial groups, Health, Social and economic status

Related Program

The Shelter

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Health, Social and economic status, Unemployed people

Related Program

The Shelter

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of bed nights (nights spent in shelter)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Unemployed people, Social and economic status, Health, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

The Shelter

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Health, Social and economic status, Unemployed people

Related Program

The Shelter

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of homeless participants engaged in mental health services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Health, Social and economic status, Unemployed people

Related Program

The Shelter

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The impact we have within our community can be measured in both immediate needs and long-terms goals.

In terms of immediate needs, our impact can be measured by the quality and quantity of the services we provide for those with nowhere else to turn.

Our ultimate goal is to help put an end to homelessness - one person at a time.

To achieve our goals takes thousands of hours of dedicated case management services, working with individuals to navigate complex systems to obtain their identification, benefits, and health care.

Hundreds of referrals to primary and behavioral health care were made – a process facilitated through a collaborative effort with Henry J. Austin Federally Qualified Health Center to provide a clinic on-site in the shelter.

These achievements were only possible due to our service model as a gateway to housing and the coordination of necessary actions such as securing identification and keeping appointments to qualify for housing.

Our goal is to continue to be here 24 hours-a-day, seven days-a-week and to safely care for those who are most vulnerable in our community throughout this pandemic.

In the past year, to keep those we serve and to do this, we had to completely transform the the operations of The Mission and become even more innovative.

Our strategies is to continue to be flexible and innovative.

By way of one example, because of the economic and health crisis that is raging, we knew we had to do something different this year.

Traditionally, to keep warm, those who are experiencing homelessness would come to The Mission and stay in our Day Center for a meal, the spend the night.

When the winter winds would be brutally cold, it would not be unusual to have 200 people spend the night.

However, because of the social distancing required for us to comply with CDC and HUD guidelines, we can now only hose 50 people in the Day Center.

So, one of the first things we did was to rent a home so that some of our residents were able to relocate there. Then we were able to place 23 of the most vulnerable individuals who stay at The Mission in a remote area where they each had separate rooms.

Then, in collaboration with the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen and funding from the Princeton Area Community Foundation, we were able to relocate our Thrift Store to another area in The Mission - so that we could create a Warming Center for 60 more homeless individuals to be safe from the ravages of the pandemic and the equally threatening below-freezing winds of this winter.

This project started with recognizing the essential need. Then, by collaborating, we were able to create a solution. Still, of course, it is only occurring because of the compassion and generosity of our community.

In our last fiscal year, we provided over 38,000 bed nights and served over 72,000 meals to more than 1,000 individuals who knocked on our Shelter’s door.

For over a century, whenever someone has knocked on our door, all we’ve ever asked are two questions: “What’s your name?” and “Are you hungry?”

Then we provide immediate relief from the elements, a place to rest in comfort, a respite from hunger, and the peace of mind associated with a familiar, safe haven. And over a shared meal, our dedicated and talented staff help each individual determine “What’s next?”

Then, through a coordinated assessment process, the needs of each individual who is homeless are identified and prioritized; then, in coordination with our partners in the Trenton/Mercer Continuum of Care, using the Housing First Model, we help each individual realize his or her full potential by gaining access to health care, providing substance abuse treatment, and, for those who qualify, the possibility to enter supportive housing.

Many individuals also opt to move from our Shelter to our Behavioral Health Center, where they can receive further counseling, along with vocational development training, and the opportunity to start their lives over again.

To provide an understanding of the scope and breadth of our services: In FY2020, the overall Emergency Services program provided shelter to 1,018 homeless adults in Mercer County for a total of 38,005 shelter stays, and served 71,992 meals.

During the very cold days of winter it is not at all uncommon to see over 200 individuals come to The Mission for respite from the elements; this past year 104 clients on average used the Emergency Shelter, with higher daily census during weather emergencies, including extreme heat, cold, rain, and snow.

Between July 1, 2019 and June 30, 2020, 63 individuals who entered The Shelter were referred to Rapid Re-Housing, and 153 obtained Housing (including Permanent, Permanent Supportive, and Transitional).

In addition, 162 were referred for substance use treatment, 167 were referred for mental health treatment, 197 were referred for health care concerns, and 52 were referred for SOAR benefits.

To get to this point took thousands of hours of dedicated case management services, working with individuals to navigate complex systems to obtain identification, benefits, and health insurance. Hundreds of referrals to primary and behavioral health care were made – a process facilitated through a collaborative effort with Henry J. Austin Health Center.

These achievements were only possible due to our 57 full-time and 25 part-time talented and devoted employees, and to our community-wide service model as a gateway to housing, where we schedule our partner providers to meet with clients regularly on site in The Shelter, eliminating the need for our clients to navigate a complex care network.

In the beginning of March, when the pandemic began to surge, we knew three things were true.

First, we knew that most of the individuals we serve were highly vulnerable to contracting the coronavirus.

The second thing we knew was that we had to remain open 24 hours-a-day, seven days-a-week.

When the Governor directed everyone who was not an essential employee to stay home, we knew that staying home was not an option for anyone who was homeless.

So, the third thing we knew was that we had to act fast.

The entire operation of The Mission had to be completely transformed – in ways that we never previously considered.

Heeding expert advice, a plan was quickly implemented,
- Relocating some of our 41 tenants, so we could create a separate wing in The Shelter to keep our most vulnerable clients safe;
- Creating a comprehensive telehealth program, with over 225 weekly appointments, so our clients could continue with their medical and counseling sessions;
- Reconfiguring meals and smaller group counseling sessions so everyone could meet at a safe distance;
- Implementing Skype visits for family members;
- Becoming the first facility in the area to test everyone – clients and staff – once our first client contracted the coronavirus;
- Creating a separate section to keep individuals who tested positive (though asymptomatic) safe and isolated from everyone else; and
- Working closely with area hospitals whenever anyone tested positive.

We had not idea how we would possibly pay for all that had to be done to keep those we serve and our essential workers safe.

We just knew what we had to do.

Our resources were limited. There was no time to spare. And each day brought unforeseen challenges to overcome.

So, we persisted – and believed.

Then, while intently focusing on the immediate and newfound needs of those we serve, our hearts were lifted by the many philanthropic foundations and caring individuals who reached out to help.

What we knew to be true was that even in the worst of times, the best always comes out in those who truly care for others.

While we do not know what challenges the coming year will bring for those who have nowhere else to turn, what we know to be true is that we will be here – day-in and day-out, around-the-clock.

What's next is to continue with our ultimate goal of helping to put an end to homelessness – one person at a time.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Several of the changes we made to protect our clients and staff in light of the pandemic were the results of direct feedback - including creating a private area around each bed with plexiglass.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Rescue Mission of Trenton
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Rescue Mission of Trenton

Board of directors
as of 1/8/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Niel Siekerka

Data Management Consultant

Term: 2017 -

Matthew Graglia

CPA

Karla Pollack

Association Business Solutions

Andy Baker

Hutchinson Industries

Delia Bass-Dandridge

PNC Bank Wealth Management

Chris Borden

Borden Perlman

Barbara Buckley, M.S.W.

Mercer County Board of Social Services (Retired)

Emilio Cooper

First Bank

Clayton Dixon

Alumnus, Rescue Mission of Trenton

Susan Fuchs, M.D.

Psychiatrist

Robert Lewis, Ph.D.

Psychologist

Akshar Patel, Esq.

Norris McLaughlin

Pascal Seradarian

Hutchinson Industries (Retired)

Pete Taft

Taft Communications (Retired)

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/07/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data