NEWARK MUSEUM ASSOCIATION

Make room to wonder

aka NEWARK MUSEUM OF ART   |   Newark, NJ   |  www.newarkmuseumart.org

Mission

The Newark Museum of Art welcomes everyone with inclusive experiences that spark curiosity and foster community.

Ruling year info

1927

Director & CEO

Ms. Linda Harrison

Main address

49 Washington Street

Newark, NJ 07102 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

22-1487275

NTEE code info

Art Museums (A51)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As part of its commitment to celebrate creativity, explore world cultures and build community for youth, adults and families, The Newark Museum of Art offers a number of innovative and inclusive experiences aimed at a multigenerational global audience.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education

Since 1909, The Newark Museum of Art has partnered with school districts, education institutions, and educators statewide to support youth in the study of New Jersey Department of Education curriculum. Strategic partnerships and ongoing outreach include training, field trips, in-classroom and digital-classroom services to 2,000 educators, 300 schools and 120 districts each year to serve youth in Newark, greater Essex County, and the surrounding counties of Morris, Union, Hudson, Passaic, Bergen and Somerset. When school funding undergoes deep cuts, particularly in the arts and sciences, these partners tap into the Museum’s staff and collection to reach curriculum goals, as well as to broaden understanding of how the arts can support Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Accessibility goals.

The Museum offers a broad range of education services, including STEM+Arts distance learning for youth and schools, digital classroom toolkits and virtual services to support homeschoolers and a larger geographic audience.

Population(s) Served

Families and caregivers kick-start literacy and social development in pre-K children with the Museum’s year-round educational activities. From their early years, youth are encouraged to appreciate art—and each other—through a blend of storytelling, music, movement and art activities that revolve around the Museum’s permanent collection and visiting exhibitions. We further support working families with more than 120 early learner workshops, a full-day camp, and a host of digital and virtual experiences that emphasize socio-emotional learning and identity.

Population(s) Served

Students who might fall behind in traditional classroom settings explore the solar system, discover artists and inventors, conduct science experiments, chat with astronauts and astronomers and more at the museum—or from home. Whether they’re stargazing in the Museum’s spectacular interactive planetarium, discovering the world around them at summer camp, or being awed by a new exhibit, parents know that all of the Museum’s STEM+Arts-related activities map to the NJ Board of Education curriculum, reaching hundreds of districts, schools and centers with toolkits and virtual field trips that explore art, science and history.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

The Museum’s Explorers program is a college, career and life readiness platform that helps high school students build essential skills and self-confidence by drawing upon the Museum’s rich collections and staff. Explorers gain real-world experience as they rotate through paid internships throughout the museum while discovering their own interests and strengths. Students develop new and relevant soft skills as public speakers, teachers, researchers, organizers and leaders, while receiving professional mentoring as they prepare to enter college.

The festival also features the Paul Robeson awards, a biennial competition which will be held in 2018.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Together with the Museum’s creative partners, we host studio visits, public talks and gallery the Museum’s s to connect visitors to the creative process, in person and virtually. We support hands-on and interactive experiences for all ages onsite in the Museum’s studios and classrooms, flexible multimedia spaces and digital media labs. Here anyone can discover their inner artist using 3D printers, laser cutters and engravers, pottery wheels, design software and more. Teens, adults and seniors enjoy two of the Museum’s longest running programs: The Newark Black Film Festival, which since 1974 has provided a forum for emerging writers, directors and performers, showcasing African American cinema as well as films from the African Diaspora; and Jazz in the Garden, which since 1965 has brought leading musicians and performers to the Museum’s Dreyfuss Memorial Sculpture Garden to enjoy free and low-cost performances in celebration of Newark’s prominent place in the history of jazz in America.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The learning process never stops for the Museum’s visitors. The Museum’s curators, educators and artist partners create meaningful moments for isolated adults and seniors seeking access to art and ideas, either at the museum or from home. The Museum’s rich collections remain a vital cultural resource and learning center for seniors. And the Museum’s international network of museum peers continues to help us develop creative workshops, volunteer opportunities and virtual programs that engage and inspire older audiences.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Museum’s 80 galleries are home to the largest Tibetan collection outside Tibet, one of the earliest and most extensive African art collections, a renowned Decorative Arts collection that includes objects from around the world, one of the nation’s most recognized collections of groundbreaking work by American artists, an 18th-century schoolhouse, outdoor sculpture garden, a Gilded Age mansion that is a National Historic Landmark, New Jersey’s first planetarium, and the country’s 12th largest collection of over 300,000 art and science objects and specimens.

We support artists by commissioning new works and installing exhibitions, as well as creating virtual exhibitions and exhibiting works on loan from other museums across the U.S. Works of art on view in the Museum’s galleries and on loan from the Museum’s extensive collection to other institutions showcase important and underrepresented artists, including Native artists of North America and BIPOC. The presentation of this work helps to broaden understanding of world culture, encourage the exchange of ideas and unites communities through the celebration of world culture. Today we continue to undergo prestigious and rigorous re-accreditation with the American Alliance of Museums, ensuring the quality and accessibility of the Museum’s collections.

Population(s) Served

The Newark Museum of Art achieves audience engagement on a global scale with its digital advances. Long-term innovations in this arena include exploring how technology can support different aspects of collections care and visitor experience, including e-commerce, social media strategies, in-gallery interactives and digital programming. Website improvements advance accessibility and provide a more user-friendly interface that support the experience of visually and audio impaired audiences.

Population(s) Served
Families
Caregivers
Adults
Seniors
Families
Caregivers
Adults
Seniors

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of sector award nominations earned by the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

IMLS 2021 National Medal for Museum Service Nomination by Senator Cory Booker, 25 external speaking requests for leadership, 10 positions held by leadership staff in community initiatives

Number of members from priority population attending training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

206 educators received STEAM training, 55 Docents received 500+ hours of art collection and audience training, 25 educators attended 2 social/emotional learning during COVID workshops

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

1,000 Hours of volunteer service from Museum members (Jan-Mar 2020) 500 Hours of docent tour service from Museum volunteer 4,000 hours of volunteer service from Museum members, 80 returning volunteers

Number of website pageviews

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

220,923 annual number of website sessions, 148,000 unique website visitors, 72,923 returning website visitors, 40,451 Social Media followers

Hours of expertise provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

1,300 hours of open gallery access, 1,000 hours of priority access for schools served on field trips and in-class services, 500 hours space rented to organizations and individuals

Number of broadcast audience members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Teens (grades 9-12)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

1,850 free seats to screenings, 20 filmmakers supported, 20 free screenings, 10 hours of live broadcast

Total number of works loaned

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

10 art works commissioned, 200 art works restored, 3 artist residencies

Total number of fields trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

273 schools served, 48,000 school-children served with onsite and in-school services, 150 guided tours for adults and families

Total number of audience members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

25,352 attendees of #NMOAatHome virtual programs,9,703 participants in live activities on Zoom,15,000+ viewers for recorded programs 84,622 day-of online viewers, 36,913 for 5 free community days.

Total number of works in collection

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

26 permanent and 5 temporary exhibitions, 4 360-degree virtual galleries, 7,540 objects exhibited in 91 galleries, 6,830 objects exhibited temporarily, 969 on loan, 301 acquired, 144 loaned to us.

Total number of performances

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Jazz in the Garden, partnerships with community performing arts organizations, 12,500 free seats, 1,500 paid seats

Number of books published for previously published writers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

3 pieces published from new writers in galleries and catalogs, 1,500 Number of books distributed, 2 Member magazines published, 2,400 subscribers to periodicals

Number of teachers trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Training for NJ teachers on STEAM and STEM, 2 open house and free registration-based training events

Number of youth who demonstrate leadership skills (e.g., organizing others, taking initiative, team-building)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

25th annual class of Newark Museum Explorers Grades 9-12,1,000-2,000 hours annually of training per student in mentoring, organizing, team-building, professional leadership, and cultural competence

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To be an advocacy hub for the museum’s audiences and turn passive viewers into active stakeholders by fostering exchange, participation, play, community, expansive learning and well-being through the arts, sciences, world cultures and social justice.

The aim of The Newark Museum of Art is to celebrate the diversity of its experiences while building bridges between disciplines, providing multiple points of view, exciting and engaging the community, keeping pace with innovation and continually looking for ways to lower the barrier to entry.

In the coming [three] years, The Newark Museum of Art seeks to:

• Welcome everyone with inclusive experiences that spark curiosity and foster community
• Serve as a catalyst for change and creativity
• Provide representation as a place where people see themselves
• Offer welcoming, accessible and non-judgmental spaces

-Increasing on-site and digital programming to drive attendance and interest beyond borders and revenue
-Reimagining the Museum’s current collections with an eye toward BIPOC artists
-Connecting with issues that matter
-Celebrating the art in and of the Museum’s lives
-Challenging ideas and behaviors
-Activating the Museum’s beliefs

We welcome all by lowering the barrier to entry for the Museum’s buildings through human-centered design, by offering digital platforms in addition to the Museum’s on-site programs, through all of the Museum’s personal interactions, and by making the museum a place people can comfortably call their own.

The Museum’s new American Art wing showcases works from the Museum’s permanent collection by female artists, African American and Latin American artists, and brings voices from the community into the Museum’s gallery labels and interpretation guides.

The Newark Museum of Art serves as a catalyst to connect the Museum’s audiences to art and the issues that matter to them by sharing diverse perspectives and voices through activities, the exchange of ideas in person and through social media and other digital channels.

We celebrate the art in and of the Museum’s lives by making room to wonder by creating physical and mental spaces that enable the Museum’s audiences to step out of their daily lives to reflect, dream, celebrate, play and participate.

The museum challenges the Museum’s audiences and the Museum’s selves to face difficult topics head on by cultivating a deep understanding of the Museum’s audiences and through honest dialogue.

We put the Museum’s ideas into action through advocacy and invitation, including the Museum’s partnerships and outreach in the community and by being transparent and proactive in the Museum’s communications and activities. In addition, we listen to the communities we serve, are responsive in the Museum’s outreach and strive to be more relevant with the programming we deliver.

We will know that we are making progress when we have:
- A growing audience that is even more diverse in its makeup
- Accessible experiences that provoke interest, curiosity, wonder and exchange
- Staff and visitors feel empowered, engaged and involved
- A sustained audience relationship
- General membership increases
- Student and teacher program participation increases
- Geographic reach increases
- Financial stability increases
- Data-informed decision-making informs incremental, sustainable improvements
- Café and Museum Shop revenue increases
- Rental revenue increases

We are building a comprehensive Framework for Equity that encompasses race, gender and class and will impact recruiting and hiring practices, drive the Museum’s external partnerships and expand the Museum’s point of view in exhibitions and public programming.

•New virtual programs and events will continue as audiences gradually return to attending indoor arts and culture programs
•Collections care and preparation for the installation of grant-funded exhibitions move forward as distance-learning services respond to the needs of schools in real time
•The Museum’s membership plan focuses on increasing awareness and number of memberships among local residents with free admission
•We continue to fill learning gaps in virtual curriculum for the Newark Public School System by providing virtual field trips connected to classroom curriculum, hosting professional development online sessions for teachers, providing online STEM and STEAM content and offering free online resources for educators to enhance virtual classroom activities

What we have accomplished so far:
Education
•Provided comprehensive distance learning services mapped to the NJ Board of Education curriculum for k-12 students, reaching 300 schools and 120 districts with tool kits and virtual field trip opportunities

Art & Culture
•Sustained and gained new international audiences during the pandemic by becoming a museum without walls with 200+ free and pay-what-you-can virtual programs
•Connected with growing LatinX audiences by delivering the Museum’s most popular programs and Community Day celebrations in Spanish. Partnered with Museum of History, Anthropology and Art at the University of Puerto Rico
•Inspired with up-close virtual encounters with guest experts and culture leaders: artists, astronauts, poets and zoologists
•Took advantage of closure to renovate the gift shop and create a new on-site café to welcome visitors and cultivate community
•Museum Director and CEO Linda Harrison was tapped by Newark Mayor Ras Baraka to chair the City’s Arts, Recreation and Culture Taskforce
•Nominated for the 2021 National Medal of the Institute of Museum and Library Services

Science & Technology
•Launched STEAM virtual services, to inspire isolated audiences of all ages to explore the world around them with sanity-saving programs, guided activities and at-home experiments
•Partnered with on Girls STEAM Ahead to explore and celebrate the contributions of women to science, technology, engineering and mathematics

Mentoring
•Saw 100% of the Museum’s senior Explorers graduate and begin college. Assisted in their navigation of remote learning and college-prep and continue their paid work experience and professional mentoring

Collections
•Hosted virtual studio visits, public talks and gallery tours to connect visitors to the creative process. Supported artists by commissioning new work and installing grant-funded exhibitions enjoyed by the largest online community the Museum has ever served

Financials

NEWARK MUSEUM ASSOCIATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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NEWARK MUSEUM ASSOCIATION

Board of directors
as of 3/4/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Clifford Blanchard

Wm. Blanchard Co.


Board co-chair

Mrs. Christine Gilfillan

THe MCJ Amelior Foundation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/22/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data