Seeing Eye, Inc.

Independence & Dignity Since 1929

aka The Seeing Eye   |   Morristown, NJ   |  SeeingEye.org

Mission

The Seeing Eye is a philanthropic organization whose mission is to enhance the independence, dignity and self-confidence of blind people through the use of Seeing Eye dogs.

Ruling year info

1935

President and Chief Executive Officer

Glenn Hoagland

Main address

PO Box 375

Morristown, NJ 07963 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

22-1539721

NTEE code info

Blind/Visually Impaired Centers, Services (P86)

Other Services (D60)

Eye Diseases, Blindness and Vision Impairments (G41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Seeing Eye is a philanthropic organization whose mission is to enhance the independence, dignity, and self-confidence of blind people through the use of Seeing Eye® dogs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Genetics and Breeding

Before conception even occurs, throughout training, and until the end of its working career, a Seeing Eye® dog has been directed to its special destiny with the benefit of science.  Today, The Seeing Eye leads the way in its research in canine genetics, breeding, disease control, and behavior.

Much of our research is driven by the fact there is no "perfect Seeing Eye® dog.”  Variations in temperament, size, strength, stride, and energy are characteristics that must be closely matched to create a successful partnershito funding cutting edge research in DNA sequencing, The Seeing Eye is the leader in building, if not the "perfect dog,” then certainly the most healthy, productive, predictable, and reliable dog guides possible.

The Seeing Eye breeds German shepherds, Labrador retrievers, golden retrievers, and Lab/golden crosses.  Our breeding station, dedicated in 2002, consists of interconnected geometric pavilions, designed so that dogs can see each other and see people enter the kennel, so barking –not to mention stress – are greatly reduced.  The goal was to provide a facility most conducive to a positive early childhood experience for the puppies and to providing a healthy, active lifestyle for the adult dogs.

The Seeing Eye breeds its own dogs for the program: German shepherds, Labrador retrievers and golden retrievers. Female dogs produce four litters and male dogs sire up to 15 litters before they are matched with a student or are adopted by a loving family. Here a mother rests with her new babies.

Population(s) Served
People with vision impairments

Until a Seeing Eye dog is ready for training, it spends its time with a "foster family", a family that gives the dog love, gentle guidance, and consistent care.  You and your family (children AND adults) can nurture a puppy to accomplish its special destiny.

In 1942 the school partnered with 4-h to organize and maintain puppy-raising clubs. Although many of our clubs still have a strong 4-h connection, there are also many clubs independent of 4-h. Clubs meet regularly to plan outings, provide socialization and share tips on teaching good puppy behavior.

When it’s time for the puppy to begin formal training, the dog returns to The Seeing Eye to learn to assist a blind person in leading a more independent, fulfilling life.  Be a part of the magic of The Seeing Eye!  Volunteer to raise a puppy(/raise/default.aspx?M_ID=425) with a special destiny.

Population(s) Served
Families
Adolescents

Twelve times each year, a group of up to 24 students arrives in Morristown from all over the United States and Canada to begin their instruction with Seeing Eye® dogs. Every dog is specifically matched to meet the individual needs of each student.  Matches are made based on handler/dog compatibility in strength, pace, temperament, and home environment.

Students arrive on campus on Saturday and receive their dogs two days later.  If receiving their first dog guides, they stay to train with the dogs for 27 days; for subsequent dogs, the instruction lasts about 20 days. Each student is assigned to work with one instructor, who has no more than four or five students in a class. 

Daily instructional routines may include traveling throughout the heavily trafficked streets of downtown Morristown, the quiet residential areas, country roads, shopping malls, train stations, bus routes, hotels, and even the nearby streets of New York City.  When the newly formed teams leave The Seeing Eye, they have mastered the techniques they will need to navigate safely through daily life in their hometowns.

What Our Graduates Tell Us

The difference The Seeing Eye makes in the lives of people who are blind can best be demonstrated by the graduates themselves … people who are living their lives – some ordinary and others not-so-ordinary – enhanced by their daily experiences with their dogs. We strive to make constant improvements to our program, listening closely to what all our students have to say during exit interviews at the end of class and in surveys that take place several months after they return home.

Five years of survey results revealed the following:

93.4 percent said they are more mobile now than before they had a dog.
83 percent described their overall Seeing Eye experience as "excellent,” and 13 percent as "good.”
97.7 percent said they would recommend The Seeing Eye program to others.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

American Animal Hospital Association

Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of years of formal education for teachers/instructors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with vision impairments, Adults

Related Program

Instruction and Training

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our instructors must have a four-year college degree followed by a three-year in-house apprenticeship program.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Older adults, Seniors, Young adults, People with vision impairments

Related Program

Instruction and Training

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our class sizes were reduced in 2020 due to COVID-19. In addition, we provide follow-up support as needed to our 1,700 active graduates in the U.S. and Canada.

Total number of periodical subscribers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with vision impairments

Related Program

Instruction and Training

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of guided tours given

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with vision impairments, Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We gave weekly guided tours until COVID-19. We now do virtual tours.

Number of free participants of guided tours

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with vision impairments, Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We have gone to virtual tours in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Hours of expertise provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with vision impairments

Related Program

Instruction and Training

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Each new student spends three weeks living on our campus to learn how to care for and use a Seeing Eye dog. In addition, we provide follow-up support for the lifetime of the partnership.

Total numbers of veterinarians registered/licensed by the veterinary statutory body of the country

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with vision impairments

Related Program

Genetics and Breeding

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with vision impairments

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with vision impairments

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We did not allow volunteers on campus during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Number of program graduates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, People with vision impairments

Related Program

Instruction and Training

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to COVID-19, we reduced our class sizes in 2020.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our Goals:
1 - To increase the independence and dignity of people who are blind, at all times treating applicants, students and graduates with respect.
2 - To provide the best dog guides possible by ensuring they are well bred and cared for, appropriately socialized, and expertly trained.
3 - To educate the public about the use of dog guides and the capabilities of people who are blind, and to provide recommendations regarding public policy issues.
4 - To provide ongoing assistance to our graduates and their dogs in order to extend the life of each partnership.
5 - To practice fiduciary responsibility, ensuring that we can fulfill the future needs of Seeing Eye dog users.

In pursuit of our mission, The Seeing Eye:

1 - Breeds and raises puppies to become Seeing Eye dogs (or obtains them occasionally by purchase or exchange);
2 - Trains Seeing Eye dogs to guide blind people;
3 - Instructs blind people in the proper use, handling, and care of the dogs;
4 - Conducts and supports research on canine health and development

1 - Mission Passion: Our passion for the mission of The Seeing Eye gives each day purpose.
2 - Stewardship: We keep the trust of our constituents and protect their interests through responsible individual action and caring use of the organization's resources.
3 - Teamwork and Collaboration: We hold ourselves accountable for adding value as individuals, being supportive of our colleagues in their work, and working together to foster team success.
4 - Respect for Others: We treat others with the respect and dignity that we desire for ourselves.
5 - Integrity: We are guided by principles of honesty, integrity, and high ethical conduct in all we do. We will always do what is right.
6 - Pursuit of Excellence: We are committed to excellence now and in the future through a shared commitment to quality, timely responsiveness, and to ongoing improvement in every phase of our operations.

Since our founding in 1929, The Seeing Eye has produced nearly 17,500 Seeing Eye dog teams. There are currently about 1,700 active Seeing Eye dog teams throughout the United States and Canada, and each year we serve hundreds of people, including those who are applying for a first or subsequent dog; those we instruct in the use and care of the dogs; and those who request follow-up support after graduation. The Seeing Eye’s mission is to enhance the independence, dignity, and self-confidence of blind people through the use of Seeing Eye dogs, and our long-term goal is to be here to provide Seeing Eye dogs as long as people need them.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    People who are blind or visually impaired who live in the United States or Canada and can benefit from the use of a Seeing Eye dog.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Continual improvements to our facilities result from feedback from graduating students. For example, we are in the process of adding a wayfinding system (a kind of GPS for inside the building) to help new students with orientation to our facility. We also are constantly prototyping and testing new harnesses, collars, leashes, and other equipment based on student feedback. We have revised our dog training techniques based on graduate input about what works in the field. We gather canine health data from veterinarians, graduates, puppy raisers, and others which we keep in a database accessible to staff.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We incorporate feedback from graduates in how we train dogs, provide instruction, and make improvements to our facilities.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Seeing Eye, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Seeing Eye, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 11/11/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Thomas Duffy

KPMG LLP

Thomas Duffy

KPMG LLP

Margaret Howard, D.Litt

Vicki Meyers-Wallen, VMD, Ph.D, Dipl. ACT

J.A. Baker Institute for Animal Health Cornell University

Cynthia Bryant, LLM

Federal Communications Commission

Stuart Fine

Temple University - Fox School of Business

Karon Bales, T.E.P., C.S.

Bales Beall LLP

Ari Benacerraf

Diamond Castle Holdings LLC

Thomas Kean

THK Consulting, LLC

Michael McKitish

Peddie School

Catherine Kiernan

Seton Hall University

OhSang Kwon

Michael Ranger

Diamond Castle Holdings, LLC

Hugh D'Andrade

Michael Mittelman

Salus University

Susan Gnall

Morgan Stanley

Vikram Agarwal

Bean Kinney & Korman

Richard Boulger

David Hertz

Sealy Mattress Co. of NJ, Inc.

Susan Pomerantz, Ph.D.

Glenn Hoagland

The Seeing Eye

Michael Amoruso

Amoruso & Amoruso

Anthony DeCarlo, V.M.D.

RBVH Veterinary Healthcare Network

Ira Fuchs

John Gogarty

Coyne Public Relations

Karen Keninger

National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/11/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/11/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.