Hunterdon Art Museum

Center for art, craft, and design

aka Hunterdon Art Museum   |   Clinton, NJ   |  https://hunterdonartmuseum.org/

Mission

The Hunterdon Art Museum engages people with contemporary art, craft, and design in ways that educate, challenge, and inspire.

Ruling year info

1959

Executive Director

Ms. Marjorie Frankel Nathanson

Main address

7 Lower Center St

Clinton, NJ 08809 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

22-1550244

NTEE code info

Art Museums (A51)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Engaging different communities with art, craft, and design in ways that educate, challenge, and inspire. Creating transformative moments for the community through art.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Classes & Workshops for Adults

Professionally-led classes and workshops for adults to rekindle and/or establish their creativity and unlock their hidden talent and potential. Over 300 classes offered throughout the year.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Young adults

Artist Jim Pruznick leads this open studio class designed for adults and teens with special needs, physical limitations, developmental disabilities and/or any neurodiversity. Art-making topics are tailored to new and returning students, and include drawing, painting, sculpting, mixed media and fiber arts. “Artistic Expressions” is an art class with creative, therapeutic and social objectives, and helps build skills, dexterity and self-esteem.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

After-school classes and workshops for kids and teens in various art mediums. Serving ages 5-16.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Over 40 camp sessions in various art mediums. Serving ages 5-16.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of exhibitions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of academic scholarships awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, People with disabilities

Related Program

Artistic Expressions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Specifically for our Special Needs programs. Scholarships made possible by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Investors Foundation, and donations from other generous individuals.

Number of paid registrants to classes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of campers enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Summer Camps

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Ensure the financial sustainability of the Hunterdon Art Museum.
2. Develop a larger and more diversified Board of Trustees that will govern well, advocate for, support, and be engaged in a sustainable museum.
3. Ensure that the Museum has a culture of diversity, inclusivity, and equity.
4. Offer a strong education program that nurtures creativity, develops skills, meets enrollment capacity, and stands apart from other art education programs.
5. Present exhibitions of excellence that inspire ideas, creativity, curiosity, and a lifelong interest in the arts.
6. Establish a stronger presence.
7. Advance collection management.

1. Increase General Operating Income
2. Build reserves and pay down the Museum’s mortgage.
3. Continue to develop a pipeline of potential board members
4. Ensure that all board members understand their role and responsibilities as well as the benefits of Board membership in order to be strong ambassadors for HAM.
5. Maintain practices that ensure diversity, inclusivity and equity
6. Foster unity between the Education and Exhibition Departments to ensure a common vision and coordinated planning
7. Bring together artists and art educators to discuss HAM’s programming, to suggest programming ideas, and to assist the education staff in connecting to teaching artists
8. Evaluate current programs
9. Ensure that the Education Department is adequately staffed with employees and volunteers

• Develop a strong program of Individual Giving
• Build major donor program . Increase the number of major donors by at least 3 per year.
• Cultivate donors, members and students (with an emphasis on empty nesters) beginning in FY18 with cultivation events, personal meetings and phone calls.
• Build membership. Increase membership by 5% annually.
• Establish planned giving program by FY19.
• Increase Special Events net profit by at least 5% annually beginning FY18 (approx. $1700 annually) (approx. $9,000 over 5 years).
• Include Foundation & Corporate Advancement Officer in early stages of education, exhibition and administrative planning beginning immediately.
• Cultivate officers and administrators of all grantors beginning in FY18
Create a culture among all staff to recognize potential board members and provide that information to the Executive Director or members of the Governance Committee beginning in FY18.
• Share written information with staff regarding the current board profile, trustees’ roles and responsibilities and HAM’s aspirations for the board. Create more opportunities for staff to meet board members beginning in FY18.
• Working with the Development staff, selectively target those already engaged with the Museum for future board membership.
• Identify new ways to be proactive in the search for potential board members
• Provide Board members with written information about trustee role and responsibilities annually
• Conduct in-person orientation with new board members within two months of coming on the board
• Continuously seek out members of underrepresented groups for inclusion as trustees, staff, volunteers, artists, students, members, visitors and in all aspects of the Museum. Underrepresented groups include those defined by economics, ethnicity, race, disabilities, and gender.
• Continuously ensure a working environment that treats staff equitably and professionally and promotes appropriate compensation and opportunities for professional growth on an ongoing basis.
• When planning programs consider how content, artists, and audience reflect diversity, inclusivity and equity.
o Make those responsible for planning programs, including guest curators and committee members, aware of the Museum’s expectations for inclusivity.
• When marketing the Museum and its programs, reach underrepresented groups.
• On a continuing basis, discuss exhibitions and programs in monthly meetings of the Education and Exhibitions Departments for the purpose of planning and ensure that the Education Department has information about exhibitions 18 months ahead of their opening.
• Create an additional paid position as funds allow.
• Create an unpaid internship in FY19.
• Actively seek volunteers in FY18.

We have expanded the communities we serve by transforming our exhibitions into virtual-reality experiences, bringing art to underserved communities and those who would otherwise not have access to our museum. We have moved our in-person classes and workshops online, which has also allowed us to expand and bring our quality programming to new communities.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Hunterdon Art Museum
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Hunterdon Art Museum

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Timothy Fraser

Cathy Ahart

Dana Lane

Jim McDevitt

Pamela Becker

Jorge Blanco

Bill Miller

Kathy Schulz

Jason Vartikar

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/5/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/05/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.