PLATINUM2024

Hunterdon Art Museum

Center for art, craft, and design

aka Hunterdon Art Museum   |   Clinton, NJ   |  https://hunterdonartmuseum.org/

Mission

The Hunterdon Art Museum educates, challenges, and inspires community through the arts.

Ruling year info

1959

Executive Director

Ms. Marjorie Frankel Nathanson

Main address

7 Lower Center St

Clinton, NJ 08809 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

22-1550244

NTEE code info

Art Museums (A51)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Hunterdon Art Museum (HAM) Strategic Plan addresses the challenge of ensuring long-term financial sustainability amid increasing operating expenses, particularly labor costs, and the need for a broader and deeper base of support. The plan emphasizes the importance of diversifying and enhancing programming to attract a wider audience, leveraging the Mill's value, and leading in the regional arts community to increase individual giving and engagement.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Classes & Workshops for Adults

Professionally-led classes and workshops for adults to rekindle and/or establish their creativity and unlock their hidden talent and potential. Over 300 classes offered throughout the year.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Young adults

Artist Jim Pruznick leads this open studio class designed for adults and teens with special needs, physical limitations, developmental disabilities and/or any neurodiversity. Art-making topics are tailored to new and returning students, and include drawing, painting, sculpting, mixed media and fiber arts. “Artistic Expressions” is an art class with creative, therapeutic and social objectives, and helps build skills, dexterity and self-esteem.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

After-school classes and workshops for kids and teens in various art mediums. Serving ages 5-16.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Over 40 camp sessions in various art mediums. Serving ages 5-16.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of exhibitions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of academic scholarships awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, People with disabilities

Related Program

Artistic Expressions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Specifically for our Special Needs programs. Scholarships made possible by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Investors Foundation, and donations from other generous individuals.

Number of paid registrants to classes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of campers enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Summer Camps

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Hunterdon Art Museum's strategic plan outlines several key goals aimed at addressing their challenges and leveraging opportunities for growth and sustainability:

Financial Stability and Growth: To secure the museum's financial health through increased fundraising, diversification of revenue sources, and growth of its endowment.
Audience Development: To broaden and deepen audience engagement by enhancing programming, improving visitor experience, and leveraging digital platforms to reach a wider demographic.
Community Engagement and Partnerships: To strengthen ties with the local and regional community through partnerships, collaborations, and community-focused events, thereby positioning HAM as a leading cultural institution in the region.
Organizational Capacity: To build the organization's capacity by investing in staff, technology, and infrastructure to support growth, improve operational efficiency, and enhance the museum's ability to deliver on its mission.
Excellence in Programming and Exhibitions: To maintain and elevate the museum's reputation for excellence in programming, exhibitions, and education by showcasing diverse, innovative, and high-quality art that engages and educates a broad audience.
These goals are designed to address the museum's immediate challenges while positioning it for long-term success and sustainability, ensuring it continues to serve as a vital cultural resource for its community.

Community Building: HAM aims to broaden its community support by engaging a wide array of demographic groups deeply and meaningfully. This involves creating and delivering value to these groups through quality and diversity in programming and by providing leadership and support within the art community.

Diverse Programming: The strategy emphasizes diversifying programming to engage broader community segments beyond those traditionally interested in viewing or making art. This includes targeting groups interested in cultural and social experiences, supporting local artists, and providing opportunities for casual arts enthusiasts to engage with the museum. Additionally, building relationships with underserved communities through partnerships and supportive programming is a focus.

Strategic Components: The strategic plan outlines several critical components, including:

An unchanging Purpose that defines the value HAM provides to the community.
A Mission that reflects how HAM delivers value through differentiation and creates a memorable strategy story.
A Vision for a bold, long-term goal, guiding the organization towards its future aspirations without detailing every program or initiative.

Strategic Focus: The plan highlights the importance of the museum's mission, purpose, vision, and tagline in guiding its strategic direction, aiming to differentiate HAM from other arts institutions and create unique value for its constituents.

Challenges: It identifies increasing operating expenses, particularly labor costs, and a need for a broader support base beyond contemporary art enthusiasts. Additionally, it acknowledges an underinvestment in marketing and the competitive arts landscape in Hunterdon County.

Strengths: The museum's prime assets include the Mill's unique setting and the institution's reputation for high-quality programming.

Opportunities: The growth in the Hunterdon County arts scene is seen as a chance to increase arts awareness and interest, contributing to local tourism and potentially expanding HAM's audience.

Strategies for Community Engagement: The plan calls for diverse programming to engage a broad audience, including cultural and social experiences beyond traditional viewing or making art, support for local artists, and outreach to underserved communities.

Maximizing the Value of the Mill: There's a focus on reimagining the use of the Mill to encourage more frequent and longer visits, including transforming the Terrace's perception and utilization to attract new visitors.

Leadership in Hunterdon County Arts: HAM aims to raise its profile and attract visitors and donors by leading and collaborating with other arts organizations, promoting the county as an arts destination, and seeking mutually beneficial partnerships.

We have expanded the communities we serve by transforming our exhibitions into virtual-reality experiences, bringing art to underserved communities and those who would otherwise not have access to our museum. We have moved our in-person classes and workshops online, which has also allowed us to expand and bring our quality programming to new communities.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Hunterdon Art Museum
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Hunterdon Art Museum

Board of directors
as of 02/25/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Timothy Fraser

Cathy Ahart

Dana Lane

Jim McDevitt

Pamela Becker

Jorge Blanco

Bill Miller

Kathy Schulz

Jason Vartikar

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/5/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/05/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.