PLATINUM2023

Meals on Wheels of Mercer County

Together, we can deliver!

Ewing, NJ   |  www.mealsonwheelsmercer.org

Mission

Meals on Wheels of Mercer County (MOWMC) is a comprehensive nutrition program committed to providing nutritious meals and related services, while easing the social isolation of our homebound participants. The goal of our services is to assist participants, who wish to remain in their homes, maintain independence, dignity, health, and well-being.

Ruling year info

1974

Chief Executive Officer

Mrs. Sasa Olessi Montaño

Main address

320 Hollowbrook Drive

Ewing, NJ 08638 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Mobile Meals of Trenton/Ewing

Meals on Wheels of Trenton/Ewing

EIN

22-1990231

NTEE code info

Meals on Wheels (K36)

Meals on Wheels (K36)

Meals on Wheels (K36)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The primary goals of Meals on Wheels programs is addressing hunger and isolation in the homebound population, thereby keeping them in their homes and healthy for as long as possible and out of long term care facilities, a placement that lessens their life expectancy . Meals on Wheels participants are far more vulnerable than their comparably aged counterparts. The majority live alone, have limited to no mobility, suffer from multiple chronic conditions, are reliant on numerous daily medications, and are in desperate need of nutritious meals and companionship. Seniors on a fixed income that may only receive a social security check and live below the poverty line, every day must make a choice between their basic needs for daily living and eating. Our Subsidized Meal Program was created to mitigate this. The daily visit by our caring volunteers, makes sure our participants are not only receiving a daily meal, but that they are well and thriving in their homes.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Subsidized Meal Program

In 2006, Meals on Wheels of Mercer County responded to the need for affordable nutritious meals to the homebound by creating the Subsidized Meal Program.  Participants are delivered a hot nutritious meal Monday through Friday, including weekend meals, and are asked to contribute whatever they can afford.  No one is turned away because they can not afford to pay, and we maintain no waiting lists.  Our SMP program now constitutes 80% of our participants.
Participants in the Subsidized Meal Program are homebound, on a fixed income and generally on or below the Federal Poverty Level.  For these participants, the SMP is a lifeline for their health and independence.  
In addition to hot nutritious meals, volunteers deliver nonperishable foods once a month to make sure they have a little "extra" in the house.  Nutrition education materials are also delivered during the month; e.g., nutritional facts, services, events, etc.  Volunteers deliver specialized pet food bags delivered to those who have pets to lessen the burden of caring for their "friends." weekly.  During the winter months, "blizzard bags" are also delivered to our participants so that nonperishable food items are available when meal delivery is interrupted due to severe storms or other events. We also provide nutrition counseling to our most vulnerable and frail SMP participants. We also deliver fresh fruits and veggies in the summer, and library books to our Trenton participants.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

In 1973, the Visiting Nurse Association and community leaders (both civic and religious) joined together to begin Mobile Meals of Trenton in response to the great need exiting in our community to serve those who could not leave their homes and could cook for themselves - the home bound. These community leaders saw that the home bound were becoming malnourished causing ill health and sometimes even death.  
On the first day of delivery, four meals were delivered by volunteers to the homebound in Trenton; that number has now increased to over 325 per day.  The Meals-on-Wheels program with MOWMC is the self-pay program where participants can choose from three different meal plans; Plan 1 (hot nutritious meal - includes entree, 2 sides, salad, dessert, bread and milk); Plan 2 (everything in Plan 1 plus sandwich, milk and snack) . We also deliver weekend meals on Fridays. All meals are delivered between 10:30 am and 1 pm, Monday through Friday by a caring volunteer.  Costs range from $6.00 a day for Plan 1 to $8 per day for Plan 2. Weekend meals are two plan 1 meals. In addition to hot nutritious meals, volunteers deliver nonperishable foods once a month to make sure participants have a little "extra" in the house.  Nutrition education materials are also delivered during the month , e.g., nutritional facts, services, events, etc.  Individualized pet food is also delivered to those who have pets to lessen the burden of caring for their "friends."  During the winter months, "blizzard bags" are also delivered to our clients so that nonperishable food items are available when meal delivery is interrupted due to severe storms or other events.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
People with diseases and illnesses

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Meals on Wheels Association of America

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, People with diseases and illnesses, Low-income people, Seniors, Older adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of emergency meals provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of meals delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

MOWMC measures our success first and foremost by the ability to continue to serve all those who need a meal and not turn anyone away. Secondly, it is the ability to keep seniors in their homes, and healthy, for as long as possible. We use length of stay in our program as an indicator, and reasons for termination as well. Specifically, we:
a) Help reduce the number of older adults placed in long term care facilities by providing nutritional support in the community, thus improving and maintaining the health of these individuals.

b) Improve the ability of homebound older adults to age in place by supporting them living in their own homes for greater periods of time through good nutrition, nutrition counseling, weekend meals for those with no access to food on the weekends, and daily wellness checks to ensure they are safe and thriving in their homes.

c) Support of participants through community partnerships, such as monthly provision of nonperishable groceries, "Blizzard Bags" for inclement weather, nutrition counseling, monthly nutritional/educational information, specialized pet food bags for the "furry" family members of our participants, community news and events, delivery of library books, and voter registration information

d) Assist participants in connecting with other community resources to reinforce community support networks.

In order to do all the above, there are two extremely important things that we need to have: Enough funds for daily operations most importantly, the provision of food, and a constant and steady flow of volunteers to deliver those meals.
The need for meals for the homebound has been a constant for us since 1973, and nationally, previous to the founding of the movement in Philadelphia in 1954, and the national office in 1975.
Meals on Wheels of Mercer County has an active volunteer recruitment program that reaches out locally through churches and civic groups, and uses a myriad of local infinitives to bring in the most caring and kind volunteers eager to give back to their community. Without our volunteers, we could not do what we do on a daily basis.They are also our constituents, and providing a meaningful, and efficent volunteer experience is extremely important to us. Besides doing the daily legwork of meal delivery, always with a smile and a kind word, they are our eyes and ears on the ground, and have on many occasions helped us mitigate life threatening situations with our participants.
We also actively seek grant funding, through government, corporate and private foundations, and maintain an active donor solicitation program to remain as self sustaining as possible to be able to provide subsidies whenever needed. Both these important strategies is what keeps us in business.

Meals on Wheels of Mercer County does a lot with a little. Our annual budget hovers around $1,000,000 with food costs currently representing about 54% of our budget, and we operate on a staff of 4. The division of labor in our agency reflects the three most important areas in our agency; Our participants, our volunteers and our fundraising activities to stay in business. All four staff are experienced professionals, the CEO with close to 30 years experience in executive management.
Meals on Wheels of Mercer County has done everything possible to deliver services in the most efficient and cost effective manner. Being good stewards of the funds entrusted to us by our community to serve those who need us is a top priority. In addition to the above, we partner with another non-profit in the preparation of meals to cut costs, and also offer training opportunities to their program participants.

We have had many achievements over the past three years.
We have expanded into 6 additional municipalities, increasing meals by 57%.
We have added many new programs; weekend meals, nutrition counseling, specialized pet food bags, and fresh fruits and veggies in the summer.
We have increased our volunteer base.
We have been able to increase and stabilize funding to make sure no one who qualifies goes without a meal, and those who qualify for a subsidy receive one.
We have been able NOT to have a waiting list, again, turning no one away who needs a meal.
We have made many QC improvements together with our caterer in our overall meal prep and delivery process, and increased menu offerings.
We have created and implemented our third, three-year strategic plan.
We have completed our Standard Operating Procedures for all areas of the agency.
We have expanded our staff and hired a Development Director.


As mentioned before, it is always our goal to make sure we have enough funding to continue our operations, and remain responsive to the needs of our participants. That will always be an on-going process.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

Meals on Wheels of Mercer County
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Meals on Wheels of Mercer County

Board of directors
as of 10/26/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Brandon Gaines

Princeton University

Term: 2020 - 2021


Board co-chair

Mindy Komosinsky

Capital Health

Term: 2020 - 2021

Marguerite Vera

Princeton University

Jackie Crane

Volunteer

Greg D'Adamo

CHS at Hopewell

Jon Gribbin

Volunteer

Helen Hughes Patterson

Wayne Pinkstone

Fox Rothschild, LLP

Susan Valentine

Emeritus Trustee

Sasa Olessi Montaño

CEO

John Hughes

Emeritus Trustee

Susan Barosko

Proforma

RJ Carletti

Mercadien

Karen S Ali

NJ Hospital Association

Brandon Gaines

Princeton University

Bill Mullowney

Volunteer

Mindy Komosinsky

Capital Health

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/10/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.