PLATINUM2024

Servants of the Word, Inc.

Grace Hope Life

aka The Open Door Mission   |   Glens Falls, NY   |  http://opendoor-ny.org

Mission

Open Door Mission exists to serve people at their point of need, cultivating personal growth and community sustainability. We provide practical solutions to physical, spiritual, and relational brokenness. Open Door Mission's vision is to foster life transformation in a compassionate collaborative community where the marginalized feel safe asking for help, resources are accessible, and all are treated with dignity. Open Door Mission is a Christian organization that cares for those who need help. This care is offered to every person who walks through the door, regardless of race, color, religion or creed, national origin or ancestry, sex, gender, age, physical or mental disability, Veteran status, genetic information, citizenship, etc.

Ruling year info

1978

Executive Director

Mr Jamie Munyon

Main address

226 Warren St.

Glens Falls, NY 12801 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

22-2212538

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Christian (X20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Open Door Mission is working to address the needs of people in poverty, loosely defined as under 200 percent of the federal poverty level, in Warren and Washington counties, New York. The poverty rate in Warren County is 9.9%, 13% for children under age 18, and 25.8% for female heads of household with children. The poverty rate in Washington County is 12.8%, 17.6% for children, and 30.4% for female heads of household with children. In Warren County, 9.7% of the people experience food insecurity, 40% of whom do not qualify for SNAP or other government nutrition programs. In Washington County, 10.5% of the people experience food insecurity, 27% of whom do not qualify for SNAP or other government nutrition programs. The United States Department of Agriculture defines food insecurity as a lack of consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy life. On January 24, 2019, there were 268 homeless people in the Greater Glens Fall area including 24 households with 41 children.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Shelter

Open Door Mission's Temporary Shelters house men and women experiencing homelessness. The primary goal of the Shelter is to house individuals and help them attain self-sufficiency. The Code Blue Winter Shelter is an emergency shelter that operates from roughly November through March, and opens when the temperature drops to 32 degrees or below or there are 12+ inches of snow. Code Blue shelters men and women who need a safe, warm place. The Day Room is a secure, safe place for people to stay during the daytime with access to showers, laundry facility, computers, and resource advocacy. Our new Men's 55-bed dorm opened in early 2023.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Adults
Extremely poor people
Low-income people
Working poor

Open Door Mission's Community Kitchen serves daily meals to community members experiencing food insecurity. Our new Kitchen and Dining facility has a capacity of 100 guests from Warren, Washington and northern Saratoga counties of New York.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Children and youth

The Backpack Program partners with local public schools to provide 4-6 nutritious meals each weekend during the school year, for at-risk children.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Support Services staff work with mission guests, residents, and community members to obtain resources and services available in the community; and to build and maintain relationships with area organizations to keep abreast of resources and provide a “warm hand-off” for individuals in crisis.

Population(s) Served

Life Path is an eight-step program that is fluid, personal and meets each
person at their point of need. The eight steps are: Safe, Sober, Stable, Schooled, Skilled,
Secure, Settled, and Serving. The eight steps begin by meeting the basic needs of housing,
food, clothing, and coaching. Program Participants make progress by continuing through
each step, building goals that will lead to living wage employment and affordable permanent
housing. The individual will complete the program when they are ready to sustain an
independent lifestyle. Mentorship of LifePath graduates continues for several years, helping
them mitigate challenges that may return them to poverty or homelessness. Our Case
Managers (Life Path Coaches) and Resource Advocates work alongside the participants
each day with counseling, coaching, classes, and individual care. We work to help participants break the
cycles of poverty in their lives.

Population(s) Served

The objective of this program is to provide emergency food and assistance to individuals and families experiencing food insecurities. Open Door's Food Pantry is designed to promote dignity in a time of need. Our grocery store style space and shopping carts allow pantry guests to shop for the items that best suit the needs and preferences of their household. Each household is given a card denoting how many items they are encouraged to take from each category (proteins, fruits & vegetables, grains, choice, personal care items). The pantry is staffed by volunteers. They assist guests in finding items, and with product use and cooking suggestions.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

Where we work

Awards

Dorthea Dix Award 2015

Warren Washington Association for Mental Health

Affiliations & memberships

Citigate Network 2023

Adirondack Regional Chamber of Commerce 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people using homeless shelters per week

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Women, Economically disadvantaged people, Men

Related Program

Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our shelter capacity has increased from 8 beds in 2018 to 55 beds in 2023. Numbers do not include our Code Blue Winter Shelter, with a 60 bed capacity from Oct through Apr & 105 bed-nights/wk

Number of bed nights (nights spent in shelter)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Homeless people, Women, Men, Extremely poor people

Related Program

Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

numbers include Temporary Shelter and Code Blue winter shelter.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Backpack Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

During the 9-month school year

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Community Kitchen

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2020 Soup Kitchen meals decreased due to the Covid 19 pandemic. We served to-go packaged meals outdoors.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our primary goal is to help people in poverty to become self-sufficient and contribute toward community sustainability. Poverty is the extent to which an individual does without resources, which could be financial, emotional, mental, spiritual, physical, support systems, relationships/role models, knowledge of hidden rules, and/or coping strategies. In addition to meeting immediate needs, we help those in poverty to evaluate their personal resources, and develop critical thinking skills and problem-solving skills to move toward self-sufficiency.

Our Goals include:
-To meet direct needs for food and shelter .
-To address the deeper issues of poverty.
-To provide a path from poverty to sustainability (life and employment skills, living wage employment,
sustainable housing).
-To encourage relationship. We believe relationship is a driving force in escaping poverty. Our staff and
volunteers emphasize developing relationships with our guests, meeting them where they are.
-Collaborate with other agencies, businesses, churches, and organizations who work with the homeless
and those living in poverty in our community. We increase our impact by partnering with all sectors of the
community, including business, judicial, legislative, health care, religious, and helping.

The Open Door Mission offers a comprehensive, integrated, collaborative system of resources and services, in one central location, to help people in poverty-long term, rather than just in episodic crises. Our current resources and services encompass a/n:

*Soup Kitchen;
*Emergency Food Pantry;
*Backpack Program;
*Gleaning program;
*Temporary Shelter to house homeless men and women from the Greater Glens Falls area and help them attain self-sufficiency;
*Code Blue winter shelter, open from roughly November through March, when the temperature drops to 32 degrees or below, or when there are 12 or more inches of snow;
*Resource Center, connecting people in poverty with resources and services to attain self-sufficiency such as clothing, transportation, primary and mental health care, employment, and training;
*Day Room, a secure, safe place for people to stay during the day, as well as a comfortable space for our staff and other community organizations to engage with our guests; includes computer access, shower access, laundry access.
*Life Path program--An 8-step program to bring people from poverty and homelessness to a sustainable life.

The Open Door Mission's staff, volunteers, and partners emphasize building relationships with our guests, meeting them where they are, because relationship is the driving force in poverty. As we show the love and grace of Jesus in our actions, our guests feel safe to share their lives and ask for guidance. Help is available to every person who walks through the door, regardless of race, color, religion or creed, national origin or ancestry, sex, gender, age, physical or mental disability, Veteran status, genetic information, citizenship, etc.

Open Door Mission has fed the hungry and homeless in the greater Glens Falls area since 1991.

Every Open Door Mission staff position requires specific qualifications related to the area of service. Qualifications, duties and responsibilities are detailed in the job description for each position.

Open Door's numerous volunteers also play an essential role in operating our programs.

Currently, Open Door has an six-member Board of Directors, all of whom have demonstrated a high level of commitment to the organization and its mission. They oversee the organization's finances and fundraising, and provide a connection to the community. All members serve without remuneration and adhere to the organization's give or get policy.

The majority of our funds come from individual donors and grants. Open Door continually researches and approaches appropriate foundation and corporate prospects to underwrite the cost of our services.

Hunger Relief:

The Open Door Mission began in 1991 as a Soup Kitchen, serving one meal per week.

In 2010, Open Door Mission purchased a restaurant-style building for the operation of our Soup Kitchen at 47 Lawrence Street, Glens Falls, NY. The building also gave us space to add an emergency food pantry.

In 2014, we initiated the Code Blue Emergency Shelter to provide a warm, safe place to sleep for unsheltered people in dangerously cold weather.

In 2016, having outgrown our Soup Kitchen facility, recognizing the need for emergency shelter for individuals experiencing homelessness, and the growing need to provide assistance and resources to community members experiencing poverty led Open Door Mission’s Board and Leadership to begin the multi-year Pathway Home initiative. This has involved the purchase and ongoing refurbishing of our facility at 226 Warren Street, Glens Falls, NY.

In 2017, we completed construction of our temporary Administration Offices, Resource Center, and Men’s Emergency Shelter, and began utilizing them to provide services.

In 2018, we began using our newly completed Classroom, Day Room, Laundry Facilities, and Restroom. We also relocated Code Blue to our new facility.

In 2019, we completed construction of and began services at our new facility, including our Food Pantry, Clothing Closet, expanded Men’s Shelter, and new Women’s Shelter

In 2020, we continued providing food and shelter during the Covid-19 emergency, adhering to social distancing and sanitation protocols. We also initiated the Life Path program for shelter residents, and completed the construction and relocation of our new Kitchen and 100-seat Dining Area.

In 2021 we began construction of our men's dorm and dedicated Life Path program area on our second and third floors.

In 2022, our men's 55 bed shelter dorm was completed and the Life Path program area has been white boxed.

In 2023, we are expanding our Code Blue winter shelter to 60 beds, with space for guests to keep the same bed and store their belongings during the day.
















How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Servants of the Word, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Servants of the Word, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 01/24/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jeff Purner

Medtronic

Term: 2022 - 2023

Andrea Palmer

Glens Falls National Bank and Trust

Jeffrey P Purner

Medtronic

Pamela Cleveland

CMJ, LLP

Dr. John Quaresima

Hudson Headwaters Health Network

Dave Liebetreu

International Paper, retired

Ryan Van Amburgh

Career Jam

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/28/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/06/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.