Anchor House, Inc.

Providing hope, home and healing to youth and their families

aka Anchor HAnchorou   |   Trenton, NJ   |  anchorhousenj.org

Mission

Mission Statement: Anchor House Inc.'s mission is to provide a safe haven where abused, runaway, homeless, aging out and at-risk youth and their families are empowered to succeed and thrive. Vision Statement: Anchor House, Inc. will be recognized as New Jersey's preeminent advocate for abused, runaway, homeless, aging out and at-risk youth and their families, and a model of trauma-informed best practices in the field.

Ruling year info

1983

Executive Director

Ms. Kim McNear

Main address

482 Centre St

Trenton, NJ 08611 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

22-2229995

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As a leader and one of New Jersey’s preeminent advocates for youth Anchor House is taking bold steps to end youth homelessness. According to the Mercer County 2019 Point-in-Time Count of the Homelessness, youth homelessness accounts for 25% of total homelessness within the City of Trenton. Anchor House offers a myriad of programs and services that meet the complex needs of youth, ages 12 to 24 and their families from Mercer County and throughout the state of New Jersey and beyond. Our programs work together to provide a continuum of care with the goal of addressing traumas, providing support during a crisis, assisting youth in securing safe, stable housing, moving youth to permanent living arrangements and success in independent living.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Anchor House Shelter

Anchor House Shelter provides 24-hour emergency crisis intervention and shelter for youth throughout New Jersey. Residential services include shelter, food, clothing, medical, mental and dental care; residents and out clients receive individual, family and group counseling, life skills education, educational preparation, job readiness skills, substance abuse prevention and counseling, transportation, recreation, and service linkages. Youth receive a physical while at the shelter, as well as any necessary medical care and substance abuse assessment. In addition, counseling and crisis intervention services are offered to youth and families in the Mercer County community on an out client basis to prevent out of home placement. All youth are welcome to attend other Anchor House programs’ prevention and education workshops.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Adolescents

The Anchorage Transitional Living Program is a group home for older youth, 18 through 21 years of age, who lack the skills necessary to obtain stable employment, secure adequate housing, or otherwise act as mature young adults. The Anchorage accepts youth who are transitioning out of the child welfare system, youth leaving residential facilities and ready for step down programs, and youth uninvolved with the child welfare system and struggling to survive on their own by living on the streets.

Most youth had a disruptive adolescence, lack social supports, have behavioral and/or mental health needs, increased risk factors associated with familial and neighborhood poverty, experienced trauma, and suffer from long term effects of choices made in adolescence. These youth often require multiple system involvement, yet consistently underutilize critical services for which they are eligible.
To meet its objectives, The Anchorage provides:
-Safe, supervised living accommodations for up to eight youth for average periods of 18 months, the duration of which is determined on an individual basis
-Food, clothing, and transportation
-Mental health assessments, individual therapy, and psycho-educational groups
-Substance abuse screenings and referrals
-Life skills education and assessments
-Assistance in obtaining employment
-Assistance in completing or furthering education
-Case management and advocacy
-Recreational/cultural activities
-Opportunities to volunteer in the community
-Opportunities to increase support networks and establish life-long connections
-Referrals to community resources

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
At-risk youth

Anchor Line Supportive Housing Program provides subsidized apartments for homeless youth, 18 through 21 years of age. Youth receive live skills training, employment and education assistance, medical and mental health attention and therapeutic counseling. Youth are taught how to advocate for themselves, access supportive services, and obtain and retain employment. Our programs seek to provide asset and skill development activities to assist youth in making a successful transition to adulthood and to integrate various preventative and supportive strategies to promote positive youth development, competence building and independence. Life skills training include, but not limited to: job development skills, financial education, computer literacy, driver’s education, home management, and a wide range of other life domains.
We serve the youth who have no safe place to call home and help them build a better life. We use positive youth development and trauma informed care approaches, and are incorporating Youth Thrive which stresses the importance of building relationships within the community, not just concrete supports and access to resources.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
At-risk youth

Anchor Link serves any youth under the age of 22 who is homeless, runaway, abandoned, abused, or at-risk of exploitation in Mercer County. Services are provided on the streets, at the drop-in center, in schools, in homes, at police stations, and in any convenient community location to help minimize a youth’s resistance.to accepting assistance. Anchor Link staff are available 24 hours per day 7 days a week to youth in crisis, and the program provides access to shelter services when youth are willing to leave the streets or need crisis intervention
The objectives of Anchor Link are 1) To provide outreach services that focus on establishing and building relationships between street youth and program staff in order to help youth accept services and leave the streets; 2) To provide comprehensive services with an asset based, trauma informed approach that include emergency shelter or alternative living arrangements, prevention education, crisis intervention, counseling, case management, transportation, survival aid, information, referrals and advocacy to runaway, homeless, and street youth who have been subjected to or are at risk of exploitation or sexual abuse; 3) To provide additional follow up support. Each objective has measurable outcomes that must be met.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Homeless people

The Connecting Youth Program helps youth ages 14-17 build a support system so they have life-long connections within the community. The program helps youth find family or people they consider as family, and mentors to help them transition into adulthood. Youth receive assistance in high school, help finding employment, planning a career and applying to college or vocational school. Connect to Home provides supportive housing through Housing Choice Vouchers

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

CoC Rapid Supportive Housing serves youth 18 to 24 years of age who are HUD eligible for supportive housing. The program provides rental assistance, case management, employment and educational assistance, life skills training and assistance with housing counseling and searches.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Young adults

Coordinated Entry for Homeless Youth is located at the Trenton CEAS Center and serves homeless youth, ages 18 to 24 years of age. CEAS encourages all homeless youth to come to the Center to learn what resources are available to them. Our program conducts community and street outreach and offers housing assessment, crisis intervention and case management, and referrals to social service agencies.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Young adults

Life Skills Program is provided for youth who are referred directly from the DCP&P. The program, led by a Youth Coach aims to improve social and emotional development, achieve self-sufficiency and interdependence and healthy lifestyles. The Youth Coach provides individual coaching on life skills topics such job skills, resume writing, career path, dating, healthy relationships, budgeting, applying to college and other topics of interest to them.

Population(s) Served

School Outreach provides individual and group counseling to students in middle and high schools in Mercer County. Recognizing the heavy toll that homelessness takes on students, Anchor House students receive support to remain in school and improve their well-being.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
At-risk youth
At-risk youth

Anchor House offers individual counseling to clients across programs through an agency therapist. Youth are referred in and outside of the agency for specific mental health issues or for a higher level of care. All aspects of our services and programming are trauma informed and geared to maintaining healthy minds and relationships.Substance abuse counseling is also available.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Anchor House serves more than 900 individuals each year through all programs and services.

Number of program sites

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Anchor House programs are offered at five locations throughout the City of Trenton

Number of clients stably housed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Anchor House placed 162 youth in a secure environment in 2021

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to help prevent and end youth homelessness by providing increased access, services and housing to homeless youth. This goal is shared by federal, state and county agencies who in the framework to end youth homelessness, identified core outcomes which included not only ensuring the youth has stable housing but also improving their permanent connections, social-emotional well-being, and education and employment opportunities. All our programs work to improve these outcomes. Street Outreach and Coordinated Assessment for Homeless Youth Programs are specifically engaged in getting homeless youth off the street, safely housed and accessing needed services. From emergency shelter to transitional housing and permanent housing Anchor House works to assure youth have a safe home as well as supportive and educational services for a better future. .

Anchor House provides the only shelter, transitional living, street outreach program in Mercer County, and one of two supportive housing programs in the county for older youth. In the past few years, Anchor House has expanded housing programs for youth ages 18 to 24 to address the lack of affordable housing and works with youth to improve their ability to live independent, productive lives. Staff uses a positive youth development approach in a safe and secure environment in which residents may build upon their strengths and add to their knowledge and practice of life skills in a number of areas, including social and communication, education, employment, physical health (medication self-administration, preventive care vs. sick care, prescription management), mental health (therapy, psychiatric/behavioral health, trauma informed care), community resources, self-sufficiency/interdependence, recreation and leisure.

Anchor House Inc. uses a trauma informed approach as most of our youth have experienced complex trauma including childhood abuse whether it be physical, sexual, or emotional, neglect, frequent changes of caregivers, being a witness or victim to domestic, gang or street violence and homelessness. The impact of traumatic stress can be devastating and long-lasting, interfering with a person’s sense of safety, ability to self-regulate, sense of self, perception of control and self-efficacy, and interpersonal relationships. We build youth's protective factors, provide concrete support in times of need and reduce risk factors. We encourage youth to build a support network of their own with friends, family (birth and foster/adoptive), and community resources.

Anchor House has highly trained and competent staff with intensive experience working with youth. Anchor House outreach and housing programs provide assessments, intensive case management to youth, individual and group counseling, life skills, community service and engagement, referrals, and aftercare. Our purpose is to ensure youth have safe, stable housing, access to health care, increased social and emotional well-being, and improved permanent social connections, education and employment skills. Anchor House, Inc. provides the only shelter, transitional living, Section 8 Apartments in Mercer County targeting abused, runaway and homeless youth. Anchor Line Apartments and Rapid Rehousing Programs offer supportive housing. We help youth build a support system, gain the life skills they need to be successful, address physical and mental health issues, learn how to advocate for themselves and peers, and become productive, engaged citizens. We ensure youth have a safe place to live and time to develop competencies so they can reach their dreams.

Current programs include Safe Housing (Youth Emergency Shelter, Anchorage Transitional and Apartment Living, Connect to Home, Rapid Re-Housing) Street Outreach/Youth Homelessness Prevention, Counseling, School Outreach, Life Skills and Education Assistance and Youth Leadership Development. Across all programs, we provide food, clothing, crisis intervention, individual, family and group counseling, life skills education, transportation, case management, access to medical/dental/mental health care and aftercare.

One of our biggest achievements is that Anchor House has been able to keep our doors open and programs operating during the pandemic. Our staff was resilient and adaptive to the many changes they faced during the pandemic, continuing to meet the needs of the youth and families we serve. Our Street Outreach efforts are at the forefront of Mercer County’s youth homelessness prevention efforts.

Other recent achievements include:

• The number of items our Street Outreach Program (SOP) team distributed in 2021 on the streets and at our Drop In Centers were exponentially higher than 2020 and included 5,165 food items, 2,083 clothing items and 2,379 personal hygiene and medical items to youth (including face masks)
• In 2021, Anchor House was able to safely house 162 youth.
• We provided 41 youth with a supportive housing voucher or rental assistance through our Connect to Home and Rapid ReHousing initiatives.
• In partnership with the City of Trenton’s Coordinated Entry for Homeless Youth Program we placed 21 youth into transitional living or an apartment for the first time.
• Anchor House began a new strategic planning process in 2021 to develop a roadmap for our future.

Mental health programming and services are needed now more than ever during the pandemic. To demonstrate the need for mental health services, in 2021, our Therapist conducted 613 sessions, on average holding 50 sessions per month.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Anchor House provides services to a diverse population of youth, young people and families, mostly low income and from distinct racial/ethnic backgrounds. Our target population is runaway, homeless and vulnerable youth, ages 12 - 24, many who have experiences in child welfare and juvenile justice systems. Over 90% of clients are black with 10% hispanic, multiracial and white. 100% of the youth we serve are from households in Mercer County, with 95% primarily from Trenton.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We recently moved the Youth Advisory Group meeting to later in the evening to allow time for youth to attend after school or work. We have also listened to preferences in the way youth communicate with our clients responding more to texts. The text communications have increased engagement between youth and street outreach staff. In response to street outreach youth asking for basic cleaning supplies to keep their apartments clean we have established a partnership with a local organization to provide supplies and other basic needs through their food pantry. For our Connect to Home outings, staff gathers feedback on programs, preferred communication style and timing of meetings/groups. We recently completed group sessions in anger management and sexual health based on feedback.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    By asking and listening to feedback our youth feel more respected and engaged.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

Anchor House, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Anchor House, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 06/30/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Kristie Sells

Guardian Life

Terrance Stokes

Trenton Board of Education

Beth Mowery

ETS

Dionne Hallback

The college of New Jersey

Kristie Sells

Guardian Life

Richard Belli

Stark & Stark

Russell Buckley

Republic Specialty Insurance

Monisha Kumar

MSK Consulting

Christine Sadovy

Cabinet Secretary, NJ Governor

Elaine Tanimura

PamTen Inc

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/28/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/30/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.