PLATINUM2024

Child Find of America, Inc.

Bringing Kids Home - Keeping Them Safe

aka Child Find   |   New Paltz, NY   |  http://www.childfindofamerica.org

Mission

To help create a world in which every child can thrive in a safe, healthy, and legal environment. Child Find of America provides professional services to prevent and resolve child abduction and the family conflicts that can lead to abduction and abuse. Our free programs and services are available nationally and internationally. Our 1-800-I-AM-LOST line connects callers to our in-house location staff who search for missing, kidnapped, and runaway and parentally-abducted children. Child Find's Parent Help program provides professional services design to defuse family conflicts that can lead to abduction and abuse, such as crisis intervention, conflict management, safety planning, communication, parenting skill-building, and training programs for allied professionals.

Ruling year info

1981

Executive Director

Donna Linder

Main address

PO Box 277

New Paltz, NY 12561 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

22-2323336

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Family Services (P40)

Victims' Services (P62)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

For over 40 years, Child Find has been working with the families of missing, abducted, runaway, and throwaway children, putting us at the vanguard of agencies that recognize the link between family conflict and parental abductions, runaways, and youth trafficking. Through our work in locating the missing, as well as educating the public in safety and awareness, we recognize that preventing a child from going missing requires proactively addressing the issue of family conflict.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Location Services

Child Finds 1-800-I-AM-LOST line connects callers to our location staff who coordinate efforts with a network of professional partners. Child Find searches for missing, kidnapped, runaway, and parentally abducted children. When safe and appropriate, posters of missing children are disseminated nationwide via social media and with the support of media outlets, businesses, and volunteers. I

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Child Find's Parent Help program provides professional services to defuse family conflicts that can lead to abduction and abuse such as: crisis intervention, conflict management, safety planning, communication / parenting skill-building, and more.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Child Find's Education & Training program delivers workshops to human service professionals and educators to prevent and resolve the impact of parental conflict on children. The curriculum is informed by casework and through staff development through trainings concerning the latest research on educational techniques and program issues. Child Finds extensive Information & Referral network and resources serve parents and professionals. Free materials are available on our website and by calling our toll free number.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Where we work

Awards

A+ Charity Rating 2020

Charity Watch

Seal of Excellence 2020

Independent Charities of America/Children's Charities of America

America's 100 Best Charities 2001

Worth Magazine

Certified 2020

America's Best Charities

100/100 Encompass Rating 2021

Charity Navigator

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of missing children profiled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Location Services

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

#s include children whose photos were not published due to safety concerns re: dom. violence, trafficking, gangs and other co-occurring issues which publicity would contribute to their endangerment.

Number of missing children who were profiled and have been located

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Location Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

FY 22/23: Of 449 missing cases, 158 were returned, 47 caller unsafe, 34 caller disengaged, and 51 pending. 159 remain active incl. 61 open for more than 10 years.

Number of clients referred to other services as part of their support strategy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Child Find's Parent Help

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All clients received this service. The number reflects the total number of referrals, with many clients in need of multiple referrals re: DV, mental health, legal, substance abuse,DSS, etc

Number of training events conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Child Find's Education & Professional Training

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Concentrated on new and updated trainings. Slow post-COVID return to live trainings, projecting more for FY 23/24. 30 educational tool kits were sent to NYS Mid-Hudson Valley early education centers.

Number of families served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Child Find's Parent Help

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Issues worked on include: child abduction, runaways/trafficking, child safety, domestic violence, custody, denied access, drug & alcohol abuse, co-parenting plans, negotiating legal systems and more.

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Child Find's Education & Professional Training

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Combined #: 1 Podcast, How Parental Conflict Creates Unsafe Environments for Children. 1 webinar, Dads and Mental Health Matter. 1 in-person workshop, Peer Brainstorming at the Fatherhood Table.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Child Find's Parent Help

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In FY 22/23: 376 new missing children cases impacted 1,375 left behind siblings who cope with feelings like anger, guilt, fear, and helplessness. Caseworker efforts address these children as well.

The number of case worker efforts promoting The 5 Protective Factors that help to mitigate Adverse Childhood Experiences in children

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Child Find's Parent Help

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Work directly promotive of a child's well-being, addressing and improving on what child welfare research calls The 5 Protective Factors, protecting from adversity and promoting healthy growth.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To create a world in which every child can thrive in a safe, healthy and legal environment, Child Find of America provides professional services to prevent and resolve child abduction and the family conflicts that can lead to child abduction and abuse, and the sense of hopelessness that causes children to run away.

Many parents are unaware of the impact their conflict has on their children, but research shows early prevention interventions, especially the dissemination of educational materials, are impactful and lead to better outcomes for children and families. From a very early age, children who live in high conflict homes live with fear, anger, anxiety, sadness, disturbed sleep, and more health problems than their peers. They are more likely to be aggressive, depressed, and antisocial, and they are at risk for developing poor interpersonal skills, cognitive abilities, and difficulty focusing and succeeding at school.

Exposure to parental conflict teaches kids the wrong way to interact with others. Children do not get used to parental conflict - they become more sensitive to it and more vulnerable to its effects. Consequently, they are more likely to continue the cycle of conflict and high-risk parenting.

"Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) have a tremendous impact on future violence, victimization and perpetration, and lifelong health and opportunity. Working together, we can help create neighborhoods, communities, and a world in which every child can thrive."

In 2017, Child Find received a grant from the American Legions Child Welfare Foundation to produce and distribute our In Safe Hands tool kit to Head Starts nationwide, which addressed family conflict and violence and its adverse impact on children (ACEs). Head Start collaboration offices in all 50 states received a supply of kits, free of charge, to distribute to local Head Start agencies. The response to the kit was very positive, with dozens of Head Start offices requesting additional kits as well as trainings on its application and delivery in the field of early childhood education.

In FY 17/18 Child Find piloted the In Safe Hands project, conducting workshops for Head Starts and early educators in New England and throughout New York. Each presentation was evaluated by participants who were enthusiastic, and comments informed the development of future trainings.

In FY 18/19 Child Find pursued funding for reprinting the tool kit, and funding to defray costs of Child Finds educational sessions. While we received some funding to provide workshops. Without funding, Child Find charges, at cost, allied professionals for the delivery of workshops and materials. (All programs and services to families remain free of charge.) Strategies for making this project happen, mirror those of our proven strategies for sustaining our agency over the years, such as: grant-writing, targeted emailing, and listing in national 211 Directories.

Starting in 2020, largely due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Child Find began exploring avenues for targeting outreach to families in isolation. We focused our efforts on our social media platforms, which we primarily use for sharing information about missing children. We began to overhaul our social media presence by expanding our platforms to include Instagram and Threads and implementing targeted ads on Meta platforms to reach parents and families who needed our help most. We have also shifted our focus to include information and resources for families.

We have seen a steady increase in the number of cases reported to us as a result of these outreach efforts Our numbers are tied to Child Finds continued investment in our website and social media efforts accounting for 51% of all case referrals in FY 22/23, up 6% from FY 21/22 and 16% from FY 20/21.

We have also significantly overhauled our website and in turn increased website traffic. Website growth stats show a 116% increase in users in the last year, with over 140,000 users referred to our website via search engines.

Child Find was founded in 1980 by the left-behind mother of a parentally abducted child. Since then, Child Find has played a significant role in the creation of laws that now make all forms of child abduction a crime, and in the establishment of a national clearinghouse to assist law enforcement in their investigations. Child Find also contributed to the establishment of May 25th as National Missing Children's Day. In 2002, the White House recognized Child Find's vital work and expertise by inviting the Executive Director to speak at the first White House Conference on Missing and Exploited Children.

Over the years, Child Find has greatly expanded its scope of services, providing prevention, education, mediation, conflict resolution, investigation, information and referral and support services to families in crisis in both the United States and internationally in more than a dozen countries. Child Find is a national expert in the prevention and resolution of parental and family abduction.

Child Find's training team is comprised of experienced case workers who have helped thousands of people facing family crisis situations, domestic violence, child abuse, parenting disputes, and child safety issues. Our work, staff development, and extensive research informs and updates our curricula.

The CDC-Kaiser Permanente Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study is one of the largest investigations of childhood abuse and neglect and household challenges and later-life health and well-being.

Child Find's development and continued distribution of the In Safe Hands tool kit addresses common caregiving risk and protective factors related to ACEs. To date over 2,000 tool kits have been delivered to early education centers in all 50 states.

In FY 19/20, we developed our Continuity of Operations Plan and purchased equipment that enabled Child Find to continue providing our essential services to children and families uninterrupted through the pandemic. The following year we upgraded our mobile phone system adding the ability to pick up calls from the office in real-time, and contracted with a translation service allowing us to access over 300 languages for clients while the caller is on the line without having to call back. That same year, we assessed and upgraded our case management system (CMS) to streamline the input process and capture information we were unable to measure before.

In FY 21/22, we further refined the CMS for more accurate demographic client reports to inform outreach efforts. Our CMS now captures caseworker's efforts that support protective factors in children to mitigate ACEs. In FY 21-22, over 6,900 efforts were recorded, in FY 22-23 the number rose to 8,688.

Challenges and What's Next:

Education & Training:
We ran into roadblocks due to staff absences during COVID, delaying production of live webinars. Due to the post-COVID revival of in-person trainings, we have altered the timeline for completion of that project. Instead, in FY 23/24 we are submitting proposals to several high-profile conferences being held throughout the U. S. for professionals and parents. Conference themes include Victims of Crime, Partners for Justice, Responsible Fatherhood, The Well-being of Children and Families, Early Childhood Education, and Children's Justice.

Outreach:
In FY 21/22 we created an ongoing social media promotion for the Parent Help Program, which by the end of end of FY 22/23, generated 482,382 impressions, 283,472 reach, 7,093 link clicks, and 2.15% CTR. Plans for FY 23/24 include concurrently running a program outreach ad in Spanish.

In response to an increasingly remote climate we revamped our website and social media outlets, with a more accessible user interface to accommodate individuals with disabilities. We have made significant upgrades to our Active Missing web pages optimizing that database with convenient shareable links, allowing website visitors to easily distribute essential information about missing children.

Our social media presence has improved significantly. We have amassed an average of 700 clicks on Meta ads every month, and we are expanding our presence on Instagram, Twitter, and Threads - a substantial step for issuing missing child alerts and educating families seeking our services.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Child Find of America, Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Child Find of America, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 03/14/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Eric Malter

Vizion Advertising LLC

Term: 2023 - 2026

Eric S. Malter

CEO Vizion Advertising

Donna Linder

Child Find of America

Elizabeth M. Baker

EMB Consulting, LLC

Arthur H. Finnel

Ahersla Health, Inc.

Michael C. Titens

Holland & Knight LLP

Lena Green

HOPE Center, Harlem

Karen Kozac Reiter

NYS Commission on Judicial Conduct, Retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/13/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data