UNITED WAY OF HUNTERDON COUNTY

United We All Win

aka United Way Community Volunteer Center   |   Flemington, NJ   |  www.uwhunterdon.org

Mission

Every individual deserves the opportunity to thrive. United Way of Hunterdon County focuses on poverty prevention, financial empowerment and advocacy to create positive change in our community. United Way of Hunterdon County is a community center of volunteerism. leadership and philanthropy that envisions a community where all individuals and families achieve their full potential through income stability, healthy lives and education.

Ruling year info

1985

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Bonnie Duncan

Main address

4 Walter E. Foran Blvd., Suite 401 PO Box 2290

Flemington, NJ 08822 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

22-2431065

NTEE code info

Fund Raising Organizations That Cross Categories includes Community Funds/Trusts and Federated Giving Programs) e.g. United Way (T70)

Community Coalitions (S21)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In a community where a single adult must earn over $25,000 to make ends meet and a family of four is expected to take home
~$82,000 to be self sufficient it is no wonder that ALICE represents 19% of Hunterdon County households.The United Way of Hunterdon County Community Volunteer Center is the place where families come together to reinforce a culture of volunteerism, a place where neighbors come to lend a hand to neighbors in need, a place where the community comes together to make a difference and build a stronger community. The Volunteer Center is also a place for folks to come together to engage in long term recovery efforts after any disaster.

The Volunteer Center welcomes more than 1,000 volunteers annually who take part in our core programs – Holiday Hands, Tools 4 School, Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, Hunterdon Diaper Bank as well as many other community programs facilitated by United Way and our partners.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Hunterdon Thrive

Hunterdon Thrive, a unique outcomes-driven initiative, successfully completed its 3-year pilot phase in 2019. Hunterdon Thrive provides ALICE, our neighbors who are Asset Limited, Income Constrained and Employed (or retired), with community system navigation, financial coaching and goal setting. Out of 253 referrals, 96 "thrivers" achieved or set financial goals. These numbers are significantly higher than seen in similar long-term, behavior modification programs.

Population(s) Served

This IRS-certified service is available thanks to a unique partnership of United Way of Hunterdon County and the IRS. The goals of this program are to provide savings on tax preparation fees as well as assist individuals and families in the claiming of tax credits such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Child Tax Credit (CTC), and to encourage putting some of your tax refunds into savings accounts. By claiming these credits and splitting refunds, individuals and families have more money to pay bills, pay down debt and achieve or maintain financial stability. In 2018 more than $2.2 million in refunds benefited local families and the local economy.

Population(s) Served

United Way will match individuals or organizations with a family and/or individual and provide their wish list. Unwrapped gifts and/or gift cards are brought to the United Way of Hunterdon County's office. Gift cards are always needed, especially for individuals and family that are not "adopted."

Population(s) Served

Tools 4 School provides 1,300 school supply kits and/or backpacks to ensure all Hunterdon County students go back to school feeling confident and prepared. Supply donations will be accepted

Population(s) Served

TIRO – Technical Interventions for the Reduction of Obesity aims to reduce health disparities among the Latino population in Hunterdon County through exercise, education and awareness programs. The initiative is partially funded by Johnson & Johnson Somerset County Companies Healthcare & Basic Needs Fund and the State of New Jersey Department of Health’s Office of Minority & Multicultural Health (OMMH). Additional operational support and materials are provided by United Way of Hunterdon County, ShopRite, Hunterdon County YMCA and the Hunterdon Healthcare System.

Population(s) Served

FDIC SmartMoney trained and certified volunteer coaches work one-on-one with clients to help them set goals and guide them as they work toward achieving those goals.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Holiday Hands

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Holiday Hands program helped ensure that 2655 adults and children in our community had a brighter holiday season; and connects households to resources to help when the holidays are over.

Number of savings accounts used by clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Volunteer Income Tax Assistant (VITA) free tax program generated over $2.4 million in tax refunds and credits for 1535 individuals. This year we introduced a formal savings component.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

TIRO

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Thriving Communities Wellness initiative focuses on decreasing health disparities within the Latino community through education, access to healthy eating and fitness programs.

Dollars saved in tax preparation fees

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The VITA Free Tax Preparation Program helps clients save money on fees, receive EITC and EIC credits and encourages savings while also connecting clients to financial coaching and other resources.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

UWHC's goals over the next four years (2016-2019) are to:
1. Develop, lead and partner in activities that support Community Impact initiatives in the areas of financial stability, health and education that focus on specific segments of the population such as Latinos, seniors, ALICE (residents who are Asset Limited, Income Constrained, and Employed) and students;
2. Demonstrate work being done to improve the financial stability of 10,000 county residents by 2020 (10x20), and specify and communicate other goals in the areas of income, health (TIRO) and education in Hunterdon County; and providing equal opportunities for the same;
3. Educate community stakeholders (government officials, service agencies, community and religious organizations, local businesses, volunteers, residents and donors) about the value of the Community Impact initiatives in addressing the needs of Hunterdon County residents like ALICE.

1. Continue the work of the Hunterdon Thrive collaborative financial stability initiative and assess outcomes against the 10x20 goal and Financial Stability indicators of change, making programmatic adjustments as needed to scale and sustain;
2. Continue the work of TIRO (Technical Interventions for the Reduction of Obesity) and assess outcomes against Health Indicators of change, making programmatic adjustments as needed to scale and sustain; and
3. Develop a dashboard of metrics that shows alignment of outcomes to identified individual/community indicators of change;
4. Develop a pilot initiative/program in the area of education and review indicators of change and alignment to initiatives in the areas of Income/Financial Stability and/or Health.

Measurement tools: Tracking against outcomes and surveys will be used to measure progress in these areas.

Resource development is not simply fundraising. Therefore our organization is focused on the expansion and enhancement of the time, talent and treasure needed to accomplish UWHC's mission.
UWHC's Resource Development Committee will continue to focus its efforts on the expansion and enhancement of these resources (supported by the UWHC Board, all UWHC Committees, and UWHC staff.

Ongoing staff and volunteer training is at the core of all UWHC program work. In addition, senior staff is expected to participate in external organizations that will ensure a broad base of community knowledge and expertise (eg, government, other nonprofits and business)
Revenue generation and donor retention remains the primary concern of Board of Trustees and resource development activities led by the RD Committee.
Expanding revenue streams has been a priority that UWHC accomplished through increased grant writing, taking distributions from the Endowment Fund, soliciting sponsors for UWHC events and soliciting
in-kind gifts. Maintaining funding levels during these economically challenging years is a significant accomplishment which the Board of Trustees acknowledges. However, for UWHC to continue to advance its objectives, alternatives to the long-standing revenue generation approach need to continue to be explored identified, selected, developed and enhanced.
Most recently UWHC introduced its Community Volunteer Center- a center built by volunteers for the community locate in the heart of Hunterdon County. This allows program flexibility, planning and sustainability. The center isn't just a place where things get done, it is a space where lives get changed.

UWHC is pleased with the progress it has made against its goals. The greatest challenge is increasing the numbers of program participants in newer programs and initiatives such as the TIRO health program and in Hunterdon Thrive. Some of this is attributed to the rural nature of our county, which makes transportation a challenge. It also takes time to create the trust necessary when asking people to share personal health or financial information. Even with those challenges, TIRO and Hunterdon Thrive have each positively touched more than 100 of our neighbors over the last year.

We are proud to share that the VITA free tax program brought more than $1.5 million in tax credits and refunds back to hardworking households in Hunterdon County, allowing for many families to start saving or purchase a necessity such as a new car. The Tools 4 School program provided backpacks and school supplies to nearly 1400 children and the Holiday Hands program made the holiday season a little brighter for almost 2800 neighbors.

There is always more work to be done but we have created a sustainable infrastructure that ensures UWHC will be able to support our community for the long term.

Financials

UNITED WAY OF HUNTERDON COUNTY
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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UNITED WAY OF HUNTERDON COUNTY

Board of directors
as of 07/20/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Ann McCrystal

Community Member

Term: 2016 - 2018

Joseph DePinto

Johnson & Johnson

Matt Holt

County Of Hunterdon

Ann McCrystal

Community Volunteer

Barbara Piwinski

Community Volunteer

Robert Barter

ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Inc.

Linda Bryant

Hunterdon Medical Center

Kathy Closs

UWHC Volunteer

Isidoro Perez

Bradford Muller

The State of NJ, Dept. of Law and Public Safety

Kendra Schroeder

Michael's

Anix Vyas

Harding Loevner

Barry Goodman

Greenbaum, Rowe, Smith & Davis LLP

Gail Kosyla

Hunterdon Healthcare System

Diana Fredericks

Gebhardt & Kiefer

Eloise Keane

Community Member

Patrice Marks

Raritan Valley Community College

John Paciga

Northwestern Mutual

Becky Testa

Community Member

Joe Galioto

Community Member

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes