GOLD2022

The Open Door/Cape Ann Food Pantry, Inc.

Feeding people. Changing lives.

aka The Open Door   |   Gloucester, MA   |  www.foodpantry.org

Mission

The mission of The Open Door is to alleviate the impact of hunger in our community. We use practical strategies to connect people to good food, to advocate on behalf of those in need, and to engage others in the work of building food security.

Ruling year info

1985

President and CEO

Ms. Julie Hazen LaFontaine

Main address

28 Emerson Avenue

Gloucester, MA 01930 USA

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Formerly known as

The Open Door/Cape Ann Food Pantry

EIN

22-2513482

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The mission of The Open Door is to alleviate the impact of hunger in our community. We use practical strategies to connect people to good food, to advocate on behalf of those in need, and to engage others in the work of building food security.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Pantries

Our pantries in Gloucester and Ipswich offer weekly curbside grocery pickup
Milk, produce, eggs, meat, cheese, dry and canned goods
Free delicious meals ready to eat
Diapers and pet food

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Sexual identity
Social and economic status
Work status and occupations

Where we work

Awards

Partner Agency of The Year 2011

Greater Boston Food Bank

Community Health Activist Award 2012

North Shore Health Project

Wellspring Leadership Award 2012

Wellspring House, Inc.

Live United Leadership Award 2012

North Shore United Way

Paul Harris Distinquished Service Award 2014

Gloucester Rotary Club

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goals of The Open Door directly reflect the key language in our mission to alleviate the impact of hunger in our community. We connect people to good food. We advocate on behalf of those in need. We engage others in the work of building food security. Throughout our programs and services we provide good healthy food, nutrition education and advocacy to help improve the lives of the underserved who are at the most risk of devastating health consequences due to poor nutrition. We are a Community Food Resource center committed to ensuring that the most vulnerable amongst us have access to good, nutrient dense food because we know that Good Food = Good Health.

In 2021, to chart a path to recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, The Open Door’s Board of Directors approved a Strategic Framework to guide the organization’s focus through Fiscal Year 2025. The Directors identified four pillars to fulfill our mission in the established time frame: Capacity, Connection, Culture, and Communication.

Specific goals for each pillar include:
To build capacity through key investments to improve food distribution efforts.
To expand community connections to improve service, outreach, and collaboration.
To strengthen culture and deepen core values with a focus on mission.
To improve communication and thought leadership with internal and external stakeholders.

Using a prevention-based approach, grounded in nutrition education, public health, and community development, we provide those in-need with consistent, adequate access to nutrition in a socially acceptable environment. Our programs are strategically placed in areas of the greatest need to directly improve the health and welfare of vulnerable and underserved populations. We have taken a leadership role in the North Shore Hunger Network to help sister food pantries replicate our programs and provide alternative food solutions in their communities. Multidisciplinary collaboration is vital to help people and communities find their own local solutions to ending hunger. Our partnerships from across the region are varied from scouts to young offenders, faith-based organizations and corporations, schools and businesses, government agencies and hospitals, young and old who together provide the collective muscle to connect those in need with good food year-round.

Regarding our strategic goals, we are building capacity to improve food distribution efforts by launching the building phase of a new kitchen and addition to increase food processing, food rescue, and storage capacity; investing in key technology to improve data collection and communication efforts; developing and implementing an online inventory, ordering, and delivery system improving food choice and accessibility; increasing transportation capacity to expand program reach through fleet investments; hiring staff in key roles to improve operations and management capacity; and leveraging fundraising assets to generate increased revenue.

We're expanding community connections to improve service, outreach, and collaboration by formalizing community partnerships at the individual and organizational level to better reach target populations; incorporating clients' lived experiences and feedback into programs to improve service delivery; reducing barriers to food access and healthy choices through targeted, innovative programming; and building food connections through technology and capacity investments, as well as collaborative interventions.

We're strengthening culture and deepening core values with a focus on our mission by placing DEI at the heart of organization and programs; utilizing a client-directed, trauma-informed care model to ensure lived experience informs mission delivery and best practices; building a positive data culture and making data-driven decisions; and expanding training and education offerings for clients and staff members.

We're improving communication and thought leadership with internal and external stakeholders by positioning The Open Door as a thought leader among hunger relief organizations; promoting nutrition education by expanding accessibility of remote learning and digital programming to fill gaps in in-person learning opportunities, increasing media presence across digital and print enterprises; and developing and communicating Best Practices with intention.

Strong Leadership and team: Staff come from a variety of socioeconomic and educational backgrounds and are all committed to alleviating the impact of hunger. The Open Door has also taken on a leadership role in the North Shore Hunger Network to support the work of sister food pantries in the region, to share lessons learned, and replicate successful models. Financially sound and stable organization: The Open Door has strategically diverse grassroots support. We incorporate a rich blend of groups, corporations, individuals, foundations, government agencies along with fundraising events, appeals and our entrepreneurial thrift store so that our programs do not depend upon one source for funding, Thoughtful growth and expansion: We place programs strategically in areas of the greatest need in low-income and poverty tracts, food deserts, and medically underserved areas. Expansion is deliberate according to need and resources. Innovative approaches to food security: We have moved beyond traditional hunger-relief programs and implemented point of service nutrition education, increased access to healthier foods, and advocacy. Community Collaborator: Approximately 16,200 volunteer hours were clocked in 2020 to connect people to good food and provide financial and in-kind support. Leveraging our partnership with the Greater Boston Food Bank, our robust Food Rescue program engages local grocers, farmers, seafood vendors and caterers that allowed us to distribute 2.46 million pounds of food in 2020.

In 2020, The Open Door distributed 2.46 million pounds of food (2.05 million meals) to 9,681 low and limited income people (4,703 households).

When the COVID-19 pandemic hit in 2020, The Open Door implemented grocery and meal deliveries overnight – so that older adults, people with disabilities, and those quarantining or vulnerable had consistent access to food. The Open Door never missed a day and met significant need over the course of the pandemic (as much as a 40% increase in requests for food assistance in the initial stages of the pandemic). The Open Door swiftly transitioned to offer No-Contact pick-up and delivery options for the first time-- which remain in place as of January 2022. A Fulfillment Center was created to support food pickup and deliveries, all in a COVID-19 sensitive environment. New staff were brought on to support these initiatives. For safety and to ensure programs remained in place to serve the community, The Open Door distributed bags of pre-selected groceries until launching an online ordering system in June 2021, giving a new level of choice to clients. The Community Meals program also never missed a day and began packaging meals to be picked-up or delivered, Monday through Friday, with extra meals available on Fridays for the weekend. The Community Meals program adopted degradable packaging in September 2021, and the kitchen team is now preparing double the number of meals that it was making pre-pandemic. Programs that could be offered remotely transitioned to remote platforms, including SNAP (Food Stamps) assistance and advocacy, nutrition counseling, and Medically Tailored Groceries.

Transportation was identified as a barrier for clients, and The Open Door obtained funding for a new truck, nutrition van, and Mobile Market Farmers Truck to increase delivery and food rescue capacity as well as active outreach. Technology investments were also made to increase organizational capacity to serve more people and distribute free, healthy food. Beginning with the leadership team, The Open Door is also prioritizing Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion through staff training, among other initiatives.

The Open Door hopes to break ground on a capital project in spring 2022 (supply chain allowing), launching the building phase of a new kitchen and addition to increase food processing, food rescue, and storage capacity.

The Open Door is further launching a new program, New Americans, Old Traditions, a data-driven collaboration to expand food partnerships between local farms and food pantries by growing culturally responsive produce for key immigrant populations.The initiative amplifies immigrant voices in the community through the distribution of fresh, local produce to those most in need. The program will grow culturally responsive produce to honor the food traditions of key client minority groups and local immigrant populations with clients informing which local foods will be grown by local farms.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

The Open Door/Cape Ann Food Pantry, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Open Door/Cape Ann Food Pantry, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 12/15/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Chris Barker

FCTLGlobal

Term: 2021 - 2022

Chris Barker

JMR Barker Foundation

Tracy Davis

Tracy Davis Public Relations

Brandon Pratt

CrossCountry Mortgage

Irene Josephson

Joset Corporation

Jason Andree

Addison Gilbert Hospital

Dennis Doolin

BankGloucester

Rebecca Furtado

Salem Five Bank

Tom Cronin

Adam Curcuru

Veterans Services

German Disla

Disla Media

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/15/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/15/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.