PLATINUM2024

Father Bills & Mainspring Inc

Nobody Should Be Homeless

aka Father Bill's Place   |   Brockton, MA   |  www.helpfbms.org

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Mission

Father Bill's & MainSpring is committed to ending and preventing homelessness in Southern Massachusetts with programs that provide emergency and permanent housing and help people obtain skills, jobs, housing, and services. We help people who are struggling with homelessness or are at risk of homelessness achieve self-sufficiency.

Ruling year info

1987

President & CEO

Mr. John Yazwinski

Main address

430 Belmont Street

Brockton, MA 02301 USA

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Formerly known as

Quincy Interfaith Sheltering Coalition (Father Bill's Place)

EIN

22-2538039

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Employment Training (J22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Housing Resource Centers/ Emergency Shelter

We are in the process of converting emergency shelters to Housing Resource Centers. Individuals facing a housing crisis can connect with case managers to complete an assessment and determine the best options available to either: prevent homelessness, divert an individual from entering shelter by identifying more suitable alternatives and/or providing short-term assistance, or re-housing them as quickly as possible. Those with the greatest barriers to maintaining mainstream housing are prioritized for Permanent Supportive Housing.

Our focus is on identifying the specific needs of each guest and moving them on as quickly as possible, thus reducing reliance on shelter. Services include connection to health care, recovery, education, employment and housing search assistance. Our Housing Resource Centers in Quincy and Brockton serve 2,000+ annually, 250+ nightly. We also have two congregate family shelters and scattered apartments throughout the region, sheltering 140 families nightly.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
People with disabilities
Substance abusers

Accessible housing is the key to ending homelessness. When people are provided with a supportive home of their own, they can achieve self-sufficiency faster and more effectively. We operate more than 700 units of supportive housing for individuals and families who had once been homeless. We target our housing to those who cannot find and retain a home without our help, including persons who have been homeless a long time, have disabilities or face serious challenges. This includes a growing number of elders. People in our housing work with a case manager to access services and sustain their housing. 93% of tenants in FBMS PSH remain housed at least 3 years, effectively ending their homelessness.

Housing production is a key pillar of our Strategic Plan, with a goal of creating 150 new units in three years. Even with some annual turnover, FBMS anticipates needing to develop at least 20-50 new units per year to meet the current demand for affordable supportive housing across our region.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
People with disabilities
Substance abusers
Veterans
Adults

The single best predictor of homelessness is having previously been in shelter. We are working to keep people in their homes and help them avoid homelessness. We have specially trained staff in the housing courts to help tenants and landlords avoid costly evictions. We mediate disputes and negotiate with housing court judges; arrange for supportive services for disabled tenants; and assist people to secure emergency help with rent, food and other resources. Prevention services are offered for both individuals and families, with 96% of households served by our Tenancy Preservation Program remaining housed.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families
Adults
People with disabilities

Where we work

Awards

Social Innovator Impact Investing: Scaling Social Enterprise/WorkExpress 2012

Root Cause Social Innovation Forum

Champion In Action 2005

Citizens Bank Foundation

Excellence in Service, Volunteer of the Year Award 2010

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Foundation

Non-Profit/Charity Organization category winner 2023

South Shore Community Choice Awards

Community Impact Award - financial stability 2023

United Way Greater Plymouth County

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of clients experiencing homelessness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Figures indicate the total number of individuals and families in households served throughout all agency programs, including housing, shelter, workforce development, tenancy preservation, and more.

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans

Related Program

Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Breakfast, lunch, and dinner served to community members in need.

Number of veterans served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Veterans served throughout agency programs, including housing, shelter, workforce development, tenancy preservation, and more.

Percentage of households remaining in housing for at least one year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans

Related Program

Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Percentage of households remaining in our housing (owned or operated) at least one year after initial placement.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

In FY23 FBMS served 5,425 total people. FBMS sheltered an average of 247 individuals nightly in the region's three shelters for homeless individuals. Of the individuals served in shelter, 7% were veterans; 8% were young adults (18-24); and 21% were elders (60+). 212,612 total meals were served (breakfast, lunch, and dinner) across the shelter sites in Quincy and Brockton. Twenty-four percent of the individuals in shelter exited to housing or another system of care.

FBMS operated 713 units of permanent housing, and 676 unduplicated households were served in FBMS housing during FY23; on average, 98% stayed housed for at least one year.

Performance goals include transforming our emergency shelter response into a Housing Resource Center model, increasing homelessness prevention and diversion efforts, and the continued investment in permanent solutions, including increasing inventory of permanent housing units.

Housing Resource Center Model: FBMS is transitioning from a traditional emergency shelter response to a service-delivery model focused on immediate assessment, connection with housing opportunities or other systems of care, with the goal to reduce shelter stay or avoid it altogether. By integrating a wide variety of support services, housing options, and staff resources in a single location FBMS intends to reduce the need for emergency shelter. FBMS has constructed our first Housing Resource Center (HRC) in Quincy and are in the process of replicating the model and facility in Brockton to offer an array of day services, and community supports designed to connect with people at-risk or experiencing homelessness and develop a tailored plan to stabilize their housing situations and ultimately move individuals to greater self-sufficiency. The Yawkey HRC in Quincy opened in November 2023 and construction on the Brockton HRC began in summer 2023.

Housing: More than a decade ago, the FBMS board and staff decided that to advance our mission of ending homelessness we needed to do more than provide shelter; we needed to create housing. FBMS committed itself to providing housing for the most vulnerable populations it serves: high need people experiencing homelessness. Our explicit priority has been to develop housing for those who require permanent supportive housing, housing combined with wraparound supports to ensure success and stability in housing. This type of housing is generally not provided by the mainstream affordable housing sector. FBMS is pursuing an ambitious plan to create at least 20-50 new housing opportunities every year to keep up with demand and provide stability for our most vulnerable neighbors. In the next 2 to 3 years, The new apartments adjacent to the HRCs (totaling 62 units) are among several FBMS housing development projects in the pipeline. In the coming year or so, we will be operating a total of more than 800 permanent supportive units for formerly homeless individuals, families, and Veterans.

Community Relations: FBMS continues to strengthen its community relations plan to "tell our story" more effectively. Aimed at enhancing the community's understanding of our mission and scope of services, the plan makes clear our value as a community partner in ending homelessness. A key part of the plan is educating key stakeholders and the general public about our innovative Housing Resource Center model and our growing housing portfolio.

For over 40 years, FBMS has led innovations to end homelessness, with programs that shelter and connect people to housing, jobs, and services. FBMS has been nationally recognized as a Housing First agency since 2005 and has evolved from a single service provider of family and individual emergency shelters to a comprehensive regional service provider operating in 41 cities and towns in Southeastern Massachusetts. FBMS has a proven ability to leverage funds from diverse sources, with a yearly operating budget of $38 million. Funding is comprised of state funds (40%), federal funds (40%), and private, in-kind, and earned income (20%). Private sources include dozens of leading foundations, corporate leaders, and thousands of individual supporters and community volunteers. FBMS is led by a CEO and four-person executive team. The agency has eleven departments, each led by a director. Goals are developed by department on an annual basis and informed by FBMS Strategic Plan, which is developed on a 3-5 year basis in coordination with FBMS executive leadership and board members. FBMS Board of Directors meets bi-monthly and is an engaged volunteer board, comprised of a cross-section of community members from across the region including local business owners, the religious community, and former program participants. Our Board Development Committee meets with potential board members to ensure a diverse representation of leadership that is consistent with the makeup of the community and complementary to our mission. Financial accounting practices include a Chief Financial Officer who is a Certified Public Accountant, Board Review, and outside audits.

Housing Resource Center (HRC) Model: The HRC which opened in Fall 2023 in Quincy includes a drop-in day center, a new service-delivery model, and 30 units of on-site PSH. We broke ground on a second HRC in the Summer of 2023 to bring the model in Brockton.

Emergency Shelter for Individuals: FBMS currently operates two congregate individual shelters, the Yawkey Housing Resource which replaced Father Bill's Place in 2023 (Quincy) and MainSpring House (Brockton). In FY23 FBMS sheltered an average of 247 individuals nightly across all shelters. The shelters are open 24 hours per day/7 days per week and are low threshold, accepting any person in need ages 18 and over. Services include shelter, breakfast, lunch, and dinner, onsite health clinics, case management, and assistance with rapid exit to housing or long-term treatment. Emergency Shelter for Families: FBMS operates three congregate shelters and units of scattered site shelter for 161 homeless families nightly.

Diversion and Prevention: FBMS provides diversion and prevention to both individuals and families and is the regional Tenancy Preservation Program provider.

Housing: FBMS has developed a portfolio of over 700 affordable housing units, with a yearly housing retention rate of 98%. FBMS has over 80 units of permanent housing for families.

FBMS is at a point of fulling realizing a longstanding vision of how we address homelessness. Replacing a reactive emergency shelter model with a proactive housing-based approach. Our bold plan invests in more homelessness prevention and diversion resources, expands daytime wraparound supports, and pursues creative opportunities to create housing for our most vulnerable neighbors.

Housing Resource Center Model: FBMS is transitioning from a traditional emergency shelter model to a one location Housing Resource Center facility focused on immediate assessment and rapid exit to housing or other systems of care. The Yawkey HRC includes a day facility, including a commercial kitchen for community meals, a full-service health clinic, partner resources, a smaller emergency shelter, and 30 units of on-site PSH. The purpose of this model is to assess individuals at risk of or experiencing homelessness in one location and provide connection to resources that help them return to housing as rapidly as possible. FBMS does this by engaging with individuals as soon as they make contact with our program, creating a tailored rehousing plan, and connecting them to appropriate resources in the community in real time.

The new model was intentionally developed so that shelter diversion is possible, or the length of stay is brief. Last year 24% of individuals exited to housing or another appropriate system of care (such as a substance use disorder treatment facility, hospital, or nursing home). FBMS successfully reduced the average length of time homeless by 57 bed nights between FY21 and FY22, despite the extremely tight housing market in the region and entire Northeast and housing cost inflation. As homelessness and the cost of living continue to rise, FBMS has developed other evidence-based practice models across the spectrum including homelessness prevention, eviction prevention, rapid re-housing, healthy meals programs, supportive housing, and job training programs. Each of these are being implemented now within the Yawkey HRC and will be an increasingly significant part of the service delivery continuum.

Permanent Housing: In FY23, FBMS operated 713 permanent housing units, either owned or leased by FBMS. From FY21 to FY23, we increased our housing portfolio from 580 to 713 units (an increase of 133 units). We are building new development and pursing cost-effective solutions to achieve our housing goals. We are starting plans on our second hotel-to-housing conversion in the region. Our first project, the Roadway Apartments in Brockton, converted motel rooms into 69 units of PSH for individuals and has been occupied since summer 2022. The second project will convert an empty motel in Stoughton into 24 units of PSH.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Father Bills & Mainspring Inc

Board of directors
as of 02/27/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Al Becker

Jack Conway & Co.

Mary Catherine Finn

Brockton Neighborhood Health Center

Elizabeth Kim

Arbella Insurance

Michael Kryzanek

Bridgewater State University

Jay Lynch

Lynch & Lynch Law Office

Jane Wing

The Cooperative Bank

James Oslin

Jesson, Oslin & Associates, LLP

Adolph Wismar

Wallaston Lutheran Church

Joyce Hogan

Valentine Street Program for Women

Corey Anne Beach

New York Times

Al Becker

Jack Conway & Co.

Ronald Chapman

DHS, US Coast Guard

Joyce Livramento-Young

SER-Jobs for Progress, Inc.

Robert Pineau

Electroswitch

Kervins Jean

Bitstamp

Jennifer White

HarborOne Bank

Robert DiGiovanni

South Shore Bank

David Arnold

Blue Cross Blue Shield of MA

Jaclyn Collier

State Street Global Advisors

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/30/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/19/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.