PLATINUM2023

CENTRAL CARIBBEAN MARINE INSTITUTE INC

VIBRANT OCEANS, HEALTHY REEFS

aka CCMI   |   Princeton, NJ   |  www.reefresearch.org

Mission

The Central Caribbean Marine Institute's (CCMI) challenge is unlocking the secrets of coral resilience. Our vision is a world with vibrant oceans and healthy coral reefs. We make this vision a reality by undertaking cutting edge, impactful research and transforming this research into conservation and education initiatives to bridge the gap between knowledge and action. As a Caribbean premier marine research facility, our mission is to conduct and facilitate research, education, and conservation programs that protect marine biodiversity. The organization, founded in 1998, is incorporated as a US 501(c)3 nonprofit (ID# 22-3609293), a UK charity (# 1104009) and a Cayman Islands charity.

Ruling year info

1999

Director of Research

Dr. Gretchen Goodbody-Gringley

Main address

1 Airport Place Suite 3

Princeton, NJ 08540 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

22-3609293

NTEE code info

Marine Science and Oceanography (U21)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (B05)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (O05)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Coral reefs are among the most threatened ecosystem on earth and they are also the most diverse marine ecosystem. We work in major areas of research addressing the following questions: Can we innovate ways to reverse the decline of coral reefs ? Can we build resilience into coral reef ecosystems, potentially through coral restoration ? The ocean covers 2/3rd of the earth and provides the air we breath, controls climate and offers a significant food source. Children have limited knowledge about the ocean through formal school curriculum until later in school. Yet their most formative years are in grade school. We use informal science learning through field experiences and through our Reefs Go Live program to provide real-time interactions direct from under the ocean to schools all over the world.' This is a opportunity to teach a large number of students about the human interactions that can be transformed to reduce our impact on coral reef ecosystems,

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Coral Reef Research to Build Resilience and Protect Biodiversity

Research program investigating herbivorous fish and to develop biodiversity action plans that can improve the protection of coral reefs in the Cayman Islands and at the Little Cayman Research Station.

Population(s) Served

Ecological, Bio-Chemical & Geological Research on Ocean Acidification and temperature stresses on coral reefs

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

informal science education with k-12 schools in the Caribbean

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Live broadcast from under the ocean at Little Cayman for students all over the world to learn about coral reefs.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Research to unlock the secrets of coral resilience. Outreach programs to community a healthy reefs message and campaign for reducing human impact on coral reefs.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents

Reef Ecology and Evolution Laboratory (REEL) at the Central Caribbean Marine Institute is focused on understanding how ecosystems function in order maintain biodiversity. Using a combination of large-scale in situ ecological surveys, small-scale laboratory experiments, and molecular ecology, we examine population structure, reproductive ecology, and genetic connectivity on tropical coral reef ecosystems, ranging from shallow inshore reefs to the mesophotic zone. Upcoming projects range from understanding molecular and physiological mechanisms of adaptation by corals to extreme environments, to enhancing reef complexity using out-planting techniques to restore key ecosystem functions. Both theoretical and applied, the research conducted by the REEL group will advance our understanding of how coral reefs and all of the organisms that reside there will not only survive, but thrive, under future environmental conditions.

Population(s) Served

The purpose of the Women in Ocean Science Award (WIOSA) is:
advancement of women in ocean sciences so they become world-leading professionals by establishing a network and providing mentorship, funding, and field access for a cohort of women in ocean science coming through the ranks to push the frontiers of science,
enacted by granting 2 scholar awards and 4 intern awards per year for 6 years.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Adults
Children and youth
Adults
Children and youth
Women and girls
Academics

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Military personnel

Related Program

Coral Reef Research to Build Resilience and Protect Biodiversity

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

K-12, College, and Citizen science programs in marine ecology and conservation

Number of multi-year grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Students

Related Program

Coral Reef Research to Build Resilience and Protect Biodiversity

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Grants supporting research and conservation of coral reefs

Number of invasive species removed from managed area(s)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Adults, Military personnel

Related Program

Coral Reef Research to Build Resilience and Protect Biodiversity

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Removal of the invasive Lionfish from Caribbean coral reefs

Number of species introduced to the area(s) managed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Coral Reef Research to Build Resilience and Protect Biodiversity

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

individuals of the Endangered Acropora cervicornis species reintroduced to the wild

Number of stakeholders/stakeholder groups with whom communication has been achieved and expectations shared

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Coral Reef Research to Build Resilience and Protect Biodiversity

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Individuals visiting Facebook posts primarily on various programs and projects

Number of students who receive scholarship funds and/or tuition assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

K-12 Ocean Literacy

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

1500+ scholarships awarded to local students

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Coral reef ecosystems are critical to healthy oceans, which support life on Earth. Though over 75% of corals worldwide are severely endangered, CCMI published groundbreaking research in 2013 demonstrating that coral reefs today are capable of being resilient and regenerating--even after extreme climate change disruptions--if local actions are contained.

Our goals include:

• To scientifically understand necessary conditions for coral reef resilience and ecosystem biodiversity through ongoing research and monitoring programs.
• To ensure that this knowledge is transformed into action and stewardship
• To directly support coral reef conservation and health through our coral restoration and citizen science programs.

• Research & Action: We conduct research programs in coral reef resilience, biodiversity, and long-term assessment and monitoring of climate change conditions. Our Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) freely provides near real-time oceanographic and atmospheric information from Caribbean coral reefs.

• Education: Through active field learning experiences we teach children ocean literacy; train current and future leaders in ocean sciences; and disseminate cutting-edge research through collaborations and public awareness programs.

• Conservation: We conduct and participate in local conservation and restoration programs that support coral reef regeneration and biodiversity

CCMI maintains an extraordinary facility and has resources for scientific research at one of the most vibrant reefs in the Caribbean. The organization is uniquely positioned to conduct research on coral reef resilience because the reefs around Little Cayman, where CCMI's research station is located are expressing the capacity to recover from temperature stress.

CCMI leadership has a strong, demonstrated track record in research, education, and conservation programs as well as establishing collaborative partnerships including with five universities including Harvard, Wellesley, Dartmouth, and Rutgers, and leading institutions that include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Science Foundation, Smithsonian Institution, UK Darwin Initiative, and the Earthwatch Institute.

Research output and partnerships:
• CCMI research has provided over 20 years of baseline data on both coral and fish. Researchers have published nearly 150 scientific papers, abstracts, presentations and directly supported 20 + graduate students successfully earning MS and PHD degrees in field and lab research.
• We have hosted more than 200 visiting scientists from 8 countries.
• Five major U.S. universities have programs based at LCRC each year.

Education:

• Over 1000 local students have been involved in the Ocean Literacy education program and nearly 2000 visitors attend tours and workshops each year;
• Hosted 5 international workshops on ocean acidification, coral diseases, and coral restoration to build capacity and collaboration within the region;
• Established education programs with several major universities worldwide.

Conservation and Restoration:

• Launched the first coral restoration pilot project (Acropora cervicornis) in the Cayman Islands in 2012 which has led to new policy for expanding coral nurseries and for conducting research.
• Engaged in a major 'citizen science' community lionfish culling program in the Caribbean region
• Discovered juvenile Nassau Grouper and mapped their critical juvenile habitats for the first time on Little Cayman.
• Discovered Gramma dejongi on Little Cayman in 2013, the first ever sighting of this fairy basslet relative outside of Cuba.
• Have located and are mapping Ecologically distinct and globally endangered (EDGE) coral colonies around Little Cayman which is an important precursor to endangered species conservation and ecosystem-based management

To be Accomplished -- Opportunities for Growth and Impact:

• Establish long-term funding to sustain our research program and to support the infrastructure needs of the facility.
• Establish an International Collaborative Network of 3-5 researchers collaborating on grants and projects;
• Expand current research programming by establishing full-time fully funded scientific teams focused in the areas of coral reef health and resilience, biodiversity, and climate change;
• Expand dissemination of research and conservation knowledge by establishing a collaborative scientific and policy network focused on coral reef ecosystem resilience.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

CENTRAL CARIBBEAN MARINE INSTITUTE INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CENTRAL CARIBBEAN MARINE INSTITUTE INC

Board of directors
as of 06/28/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Peter Hillenbrand

CCMI

Term: 2021 -

Tim Ecott

CCMI - UK

Dominic McCahill

CCMI - UK

Andrew Hersant

CCMI-UK

Kate Holden

CCMI-UK

Timothy Kary

CCMI

JS DeJager

CCMI-Officer-Treasurer

Peter Hillenbrand

CCMI

Sydney Coleman

CCMI

Christopher Humphries

CCMI

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/8/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data