Womens Education Project

Sisterhood. Leadership. Economic Independence.

aka Women's Education Project (WEP)   |   New York, NY   |  www.womenseducationproject.org

Mission

For women to become confident, knowledgeable, skilled and economically independent—beyond the expected, inspiring the values of a global world.

Ruling year info

2003

Principal Officer

Zoe Timms

Main address

244 Fifth Avenue w208

New York, NY 10001 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

22-3862361

NTEE code info

Employment Training (J22)

Public Foundations (T30)

Women's Studies (V32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Indian women's participation in the labor force, already one of the world's lowest in 2019 (at 20.3% and declining), has continued to plunge due to COVID-19. (In comparison, male participation has recovered since the pandemic’s onset.) Other, equally bleak statistics are growing. Over 10 million young women are at risk of dropping out of secondary schools; child marriage, one of the world's highest rates at 27%, is spiking. Many are forced into informal, low-wage jobs. These young women, ages 15-24, which WEP estimates to be approximately 38 million, will remain uneducated and unskilled, trapped, voiceless, and vulnerable.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

WEP's Leadership Academy

WEP provides NGO partners the Leadership Academy—a holistic, mentor-supported, certificate curriculum. It consists of academic, life and career preparation courses, workshops, field trips and skill-building activities.

The Academies are lively, safe places. Within this spirited sisterhood of peers, young women develop confidence, expand their understanding of the world, and enter professional or entrepreneurial careers.

This vision-expanding program culminates in introductions to training programs, colleges and courses - many on WEP scholarship, and an invitation to the Alumnae Sisterhood to mentor new students and continue connection with their peers.

WEP works in partnership with NGOs in Rajasthan, Tamil Nadu, Telangana and Andhra Pradesh.

Population(s) Served
Young women

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Women's Education Project (WEP) leads young women to formal sector employment, by providing partnering NGOs our Leadership Academy. WEP’s holistic, locally-resourced curriculum inspires young women (15-24) to complete school and make informed career choices.

Composed of in-person, online, and mobile-based courses, mentors, workshops, field trips, and skill-building activities in a safe, supportive environment, this vision-expanding program culminates in education, training, and, crucially, employment. The WEP experience continues through its Alumnae Sisterhood, where graduates mentor new students.

WEP provides individual and networked NGO partners the Leadership Academy—a holistic, mentor-supported, certificate curriculum consisting of academic, life and career preparation courses, workshops, field trips and skill-building activities.

The Academies are lively, safe places. Within this spirited Sisterhood of peers, young women develop confidence, expand their understanding of the world, and enter professional or entrepreneurial careers.

This vision-expanding program culminates in introductions to training programs, colleges and courses - many on WEP scholarship, and an invitation to the Alumnae Sisterhood to mentor new students and continue connection with their peers.

The WEP Academy expands awareness of employment possibilities and training opportunities, aligning aptitude and interest, before embarking on careers of students’ choosing.

WEP has worked in India since 2002 in partnership with local grassroots NGOs. Over 2500 young women have graduated from the WEP program.

WEP-India, a Trust registered, has a 4 member in-country staff to oversee the program, manage compliance, and strategic growth in India.

Both WEP and WEP-India have boards and council's whose diverse professional experience and networks support the further development of WEP .

WEP has a over 2500 alumnae who participate in an active Alumnae Sisterhood.

2017 and 2020 surveys of 200 Hyderabad and Madurai WEP Alumnae indicated that 64% were employed in careers of their choosing; 75% credited WEP “the principal factor” in securing employment; 95.8% recommend WEP “highly.” Of those unemployed, 96% were confident of starting careers.

Alumnae include lab technicians, therapists, teachers, nurses, social workers, receptionists, and entrepreneurs. There is a lawyer, a dentist, a bank director, and, from a landless farming family, an agricultural engineer.

“WEP has opened a new world to me. I have become self-confident, which every girl needs in this unequal world.” - Madurai alumna.

What Academy students learn ripples throughout their neighborhoods. In Hyderabad, they closed an illegal liquor shop. In Kadapa, one student prevented over 60 foeticides. In all locations, students assist neighbors to plant kitchen gardens, organize clean-ups, prevent child marriages and loan shark activity and re-enroll girls in school.

WEP graduates are locally employed, (earning 15% higher than peers), proud of their community; its food, language, and literature; and aware of civic responsibilities. They are role models and take the lead addressing important social community issues.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve young women from the ages of 15 to 24. They complete surveys twice throughout the Academy program.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    From surveys, we found that our students were unable to attend our location Academies. In response, we have designed a satellite Academy, using tablets and mobile phones, to operate the Academy, without a permanent building location.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    From the start of our program in 2002, we have listed to our students needs to develop activities and curriculum. A student was anemic -- we started a kitchen garden program and daily nutritious snack. A student didn't have textbooks receiving a scholarship from WEP to attend college -- we started a textbook library program. Since 2019, we have collected these details in regular surveys from our students.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Womens Education Project
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Womens Education Project

Board of directors
as of 5/12/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

MInal Patel

No Affiliation

Term: 2021 - 2020


Board co-chair

Deepika Mandrekar

Gaurav Verma

USISPF

Kathleen Hurley

Hurley Consulting

Nalini Dhar

Veeru Srivastava

Minal Patel

Deepika Mandrekar

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/11/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data