PLATINUM2022

PAN AFRICAN SANCTUARY ALLIANCE

Protecting Primates Together

aka PASA   |   Beaverton, OR   |  https://pasa.org

Mission

To support and represent PASA members in their critical work to protect and prevent the extinction of Africa’s primates.

Notes from the nonprofit

PASA is excited about the growth planned for 2021 and beyond. PASA hopes to secure additional supporters, and we welcome any questions or additional information about what it is we do. Our executive director may be reached at [email protected].

Ruling year info

2003

Executive Director

Kelly O'Meara

Main address

9450 SW Gemini Dr PMB 59741

Beaverton, OR 97008-7105 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

22-3878683

NTEE code info

Wildlife Sanctuary/Refuge (D34)

Protection of Endangered Species (D31)

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Pan African Sanctuary Alliance (PASA), the largest association of wildlife centers in Africa, includes 23 organizations in 13 African countries. Our members are securing a future for Africa’s primates by working to stop the illegal trade in wildlife, rescuing, rehabilitating, and reintroducing orphans of the trade, protecting wild primate populations and their habitats, and educating and empowering communities. PASA strengthens our member organizations and is building a global movement to save Africa’s great apes and monkeys. The combination of PASA’s worldwide network and our members’ local expertise uniquely positions the Alliance to make a sustained impact on a large scale.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Working on the ground to protect African primates and their habitat

PASA sanctuaries are actively engage in monitoring local wild primate populations in the protected areas where they work. They work with governments and local community members to educate them about primate and forest conservation, and advocate for enforcement of primate protection laws. Sanctuaries help support the creation of new protected areas as well as supporting the enforcement of laws to secure existing protected areas. In some cases sanctuaries pay the salaries for local rangers or provide staff for snare removal programs and anti-poaching patrols.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Illegal hunting and the sale of primates is commonplace in many regions of Africa. National and international laws prohibit chimpanzees, gorillas, bonobos and other rare primates from being hunted, sold or kept as pets. But these laws go unenforced unless there are sanctuaries where government officials can take confiscated animals to be cared for. In most cases these animals need significant medical attention. Wild
primates that have been kept as pets need rehabilitation and a safe environment where they can interact with others of their species and learn to live like apes and monkeys again. PASA’s 23 sanctuaries work closely with governments to confiscate illegally captured animals and prosecute people who are hunting and selling them, or keeping them illegally as pets. We also advise the development of sanctuaries in countries lacking confiscation resources and are experiencing high levels of illegal bushmeat hunting and primate pet trade activity.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

PASA sanctuaries provide the highest standards of care for confiscated primates, based on a system of operational standards that has been the model for other sanctuary accreditation organizations globally.   PASA provides a conduit of information across sanctuaries, outside experts in conservation, animal welfare and science groups, to bring technical expertise, scientific knowledge, and best practices to increase sanctuaries’ effectiveness in tackling primate care and conservation issues. We provide emergency funding for PASA sanctuaries that experience natural disasters, disease outbreaks or other unforeseen problems. PASA engages with sanctuaries outside our membership to help them raise their standards, and advises on the development of conservation education, veterinary care and reintroduction programs. 

PASA provides annual training and skill-building workshops, as well as equipment and medicine that enable sanctuaries to deliver quality healthcare and rehabilitation for confiscated primates and other wildlife.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent

PASA member sanctuaries are some of the pioneers in the reintroduction of Africa’s endangered great apes: gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos. Sanctuaries are also developing new methods to successfully rehabilitate and reintroduce monkey species. We bring together scientists and practitioners of ape and monkey reintroductions to share knowledge and determine best practices. Reintroduced apes from PASA sanctuaries have been breeding in the wild, and are helping to secure threatened habitats with new protected area designations.

Population(s) Served
Tribal and indigenous religious groups

Pasa sanctuaries conduct active education and outreach programs in schools and communities. PASA conservation education programs and activities reach thousands of children and their families every year in 13 countries across Africa. PASA works with global education and conservation experts to develop materials and empower sanctuaries to create conservation programs that are tailored to the needs in their communities. We support sanctuary staff and reward excellence in animal care and conservation through awards, recognition and training opportunities. 

Encouraging sustainable community projects:
PASA works with conservation organizations and funders to help sanctuaries develop individual programs for sustainable income projects including planting low impact crops that don’t attract wildlife; native tree nurseries; raising livestock sustainable in the local environment to replace bushmeat hunting; and developing women’s craft cooperatives. 

Forging real solutions for human-wildlife conflict:
One of the most pressing problems in conservation is human-wildlife conflict – the competition between people and wildlife over natural resources.  As human populations increase, Africa’s endangered primates including gorillas, chimpanzees and bonobos are in direct competition with human communities for
natural resources like timber, forest products, and land.   As Africa’s human population grows, these primates are increasingly being hunted as "pests” because they consume or damage human food crops and other natural resources. 

There is no one-size-fits-all solution as human-primate conflict has many sources.  In some areas, crops such as sugar-cane are planted adjacent to prime primate habitat causing chimpanzees and monkeys to come out of the forest and raid the crops. In other areas, people go into the "protected” forest to harvest resources, often coming into conflict with the resident primates. An outcome that all too often occurs is that someone—human or chimpanzee or gorilla or monkey—gets hurt.     

PASA is embarking on a landmark three-year program to provide PASA educators and managers with the skills and tools they need to develop effective solutions to the human-wildlife conflicts in their locations. PASA member sanctuaries are uniquely positioned to effectively address human-wildlife conflict, as PASA is an alliance of global primate protection experts working together with wildlife sanctuaries in 12 countries across Africa.  PASA sanctuary staff have unrivaled access and influence as permanent members of the communities where they live and work. 

This program will support advanced training for the PASA sanctuary educators and managers so they can continue to develop programs that will help stop the killing of primates while at the same time building better livelihoods and stronger communities that value primates and will work to conserve them.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals provided with long term care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Animal care, rehabilitation and veterinary health

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

PASA members are actively working to address the root causes of the illegal wildlife trade crisis while providing outstanding support for confiscations and long-term animal care.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Combating poaching and illegal trade

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

PASA member organizations rescue primates from wildlife trafficking, the illegal bushmeat trade, and other threats.

Number of released animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Reintoduction

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Reintroducing rehabilitated primates to the wild is a valuable conservation strategy. Successful reintroductions ensure the viability of wild populations and help to establish new protected areas.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

With our network of members throughout Africa, PASA is in a unique niche to address conservation issues on a large scale and produce lasting changes to protect primates from extinction. As a registered U.S. nonprofit with close partnerships with 23 African wildlife organizations, PASA ensures your donations go where they are most urgently needed and are used as efficiently as possible. Furthermore, we provide a trusted way to send money to projects on the ground in Africa.

PASA strengthens its member organizations in Africa and unifies them into a growing movement. Furthermore, the Alliance’s innovative accreditation program ensures member organizations’ sustainability and high standards of animal care and gives them credibility.
PASA gives a future to Africa’s primates by:

• Working with member organizations to rescue primates from cruelty and abuse

• Ensuring wildlife centers will persist through emergencies

• Giving training in topics such as animal care, veterinary treatment, education, community development, and strategic planning

• Developing innovative community-based education programs

• Raising awareness worldwide about the threats to primates

• Creating global networks of specialists

PASA’s member organizations throughout Africa are leaders in wildlife protection, with decades of experience working closely with African cultures, governments, and communities.

PASA member wildlife centers’ diverse programs include:

• Fighting the illegal wildlife trade and enabling arrests of smugglers by rescuing confiscated animals

• Giving lifelong, loving care to over 3,000 victims of the trade

• Reintoducing apes and monkeys to the wild

• Patrolling forests and protecting wildlife from poachers

• Conserving vast tracts of critically threatened natural habitat

• Giving communities alternative livelihoods to hunting wildlife and exploiting natural habitats

• Educating more than 500,000 people every year about the importance of wildlife and the environment

These pioneering organizations employ over 500 African people and generate over $5 million each year for local communities.

PASA member organizations throughout Africa are leaders in wildlife conservation. Their decades of experience working closely with African cultures, governments, and communities ideally positions them to enact lasting changes to save endangered species.

PASA's member organizations regularly call on us for support on a wide range of subjects. We advocate for the wildlife centers on an international scale and work closely with them to raise awareness globally about wildlife conservation issues. Additionally, we give our members resources they need to succeed by:
- Providing funding and technical support during emergencies
- Building their capacity through training in topics such as strategic planning, public education and community engagement, veterinary treatment, and animal care
- Creating global networks of advisors and other specialists

Since PASA was founded in 2000, we have expanded our mission and our impact.

One recent accomplishment is that PASA is collaborating with three members in Cameroon to integrate wildlife conservation into the national education curriculum. The goal is that all Cameroonian schoolchildren will learn the value of protecting wildlife and the environment.

PASA has taught countless workshops/conferences in areas such as:

- Conferences for wildlife center directors:
• Empower African primate sanctuaries to become stronger leaders in conservation in their countries
• Train sanctuary directors in government relations, including negotiating, building relationships, and writing effective agreements (many have MOUs with their governments that are unfavorable or need to be renewed)
• Enable sanctuaries to more effectively train and cultivate their staff, including African nationals and other management staff
• Strengthen sanctuaries’ strategic planning, such as succession planning and building, managing, and motivating their Boards of Directors
• Teach sanctuaries to improve their public communications, particularly using social media, photos, and video

- Veterinary workshops:
• Increase sanctuaries’ collaboration with veterinarians and researchers worldwide.
• Cultivate a stronger global primate veterinary community, particularly to facilitate collaboration and provide support for less-experienced sanctuary vets.
• Build the capacity of primate sanctuaries by professionalizing their veterinary treatment and management of animal health.
• Empower sanctuary vets to work to international standards.
• Instill a more evidence-based approach to decision-making.

-Education, diversity, programs for school children, programs for African communities, outreach programs, etc.

Financials

PAN AFRICAN SANCTUARY ALLIANCE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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PAN AFRICAN SANCTUARY ALLIANCE

Board of directors
as of 08/24/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Michele Stumpe

Norm Rosen

Susan Lutter

Michelle Stumpe

Mary Rose

Richard Wrangham

Rebecca Rose

Franck Chantereau

Pam Cunneyworth

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/9/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data