Bergen County's United Way

Paramus, NJ   |  http://www.bergenunitedway.org

Mission

Bergen County’s United Way (BCUW) has served our community for 52 years. We fulfill our mission by providing help that is direct, concrete and timely, to the most vulnerable residents in our community and by developing programs and financial resources that address unmet needs. You will find that our operating costs, at only 9%, are half those of many other nonprofits, which means your contribution goes directly to help people in concrete and vital ways. Our services include:

• 2-1-1: the United Way’s 24 hour statewide service answering every call or click for help, 24 hours a day. It is a system that is free and easy to use – think 9-1-1 emergencies, 2-1-1 everything else.

• The Compassion Fund: direct financial assistance to help when no one else can to ensure that the most basic needs are met for people in crisis.

• Housing Works: helping neighbors build communities with the creation of new and affordable housing for low income families, senior citizens and adults with special needs.

For more information visit: www.bergenunitedway.org.

Ruling year info

1965

President

Mr. Thomas Toronto

Main address

6 Forest Avenue 2nd Floor

Paramus, NJ 07652 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

22-6028959

NTEE code info

Personal Social Services (P50)

Housing Development, Construction, Management (L20)

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

NJ 2-1-1 Helpline

Our 2-1-1 system responds to requests for help with government benefits, health and human services programs and community-based services while adhering to standards and procedures that focus on compassionate concern and client-driven response. 2-1-1 and its companion website www.nj211.org have been providing statewide 24/7 information and referral services since 2005.

This easy-to-remember number saves time and frustration by eliminating the need for callers to navigate a maze of 800 numbers and help lines. When a person calls 2-1-1, specially trained information and referral personnel analyze what is needed and provide the appropriate resource and related information. Additionally, 2-1-1 screens for our Compassion Fund, making the connection to BCUW when all other resources have been exhausted.

Concurrently, 2-1-1 is an effective management tool. The system generates real time data on requests, complaints and services - alerting us to emerging needs and making it possible to direct our limited resources to where they will do the most good.

Think 9-1-1 emergency; 2-1-1 everything else.

Population(s) Served

The Compassion Fund provides financial assistance to Bergen County residents to meet critical needs during a short term, temporary crisis, such as job loss/reduced income, illness/disability, loss of property due to fire or other disasters, i.e., floods, hurricanes, etc. The fund also assists employees of our corporate partners when needed. Priority is given to those at risk of homelessness or loss of utilities, families with minor children and vulnerable adults.

Our Compassion Fund is a fund of last resort – to be called upon when no one else can help. We provide direct financial assistance to ensure that the most basic needs for safety and security are met for people in crisis. The way it works is simple, but the impact significant.

Most referrals come from our 2-1-1 helpline, the 24/7 information and resource service which helps individuals identify potential resources in their community and directs them where to find the help.

Population(s) Served

The affordable housing shortage profoundly affects more than 40% of the callers to our 2-1-1 helpline. They don’t earn enough despite working (many more than one job) to afford to live here. Rents and other costs are so high that one unexpected car repair bill, or one unexpected medical bill (most have no health insurance), and the rent check is delayed. Financial crisis follows, so increasing the supply of homes people can afford makes sense as a crisis prevention strategy. That is why Bergen County’s United Way is building affordable housing (though we prefer to call it Housing Works) hand in glove with municipal governments and with the support of communities. Our housing looks great, is well built, and is remarkably affordable.

We’ve formed BCUW/Madeline Housing Partners to handle all aspects of development. The Madeline Corporation, led by second-generation housing developer, Shari DePalma, is a nonprofit organization dedicated to developing affordable housing for seniors, families and individuals with special needs. To date, BCUW/Madeline Housing Partners has completed 15 projects and has the opportunity, over the next several years, to build an additional 26 community-based affordable and special needs housing developments.

Special Homes for Very Special People:

Today, in New Jersey, an estimated 50,000 adults are developmentally disabled. Nearly 8,000 of them are on a waiting list for supportive housing. Many live at home, often cared for by aging parents increasingly concerned about who will care for their adult children when they no longer can. Still others, live in institutional settings but could live independently and productively in community-based affordable housing were it available. Demand is growing exponentially as the first generation of children diagnosed with autism reach adulthood. Real but very scary, is that New Jersey has the highest rate of autism in the country.

Our special needs housing in particular fills a desperate need. The serious lack of accessible and affordable housing for individuals with developmental disabilities restricts independence. Our Very Special Homes prevent costly and inappropriate institutionalization.

Population(s) Served

In its simplest terms, Women United in Philanthropy (WUIP) is a circle of women who pool their donations and vote together to collectively make one large charitable grant to a program or service that can dramatically change the lives of women in Bergen County. Giving is focused on helping women become economically strong and independent. That means assisting women in getting what they need to provide for themselves—a safe place to live, affordable health care, a living wage, and support along the way. For more information, visit www.wuip.org or email [email protected].

Population(s) Served

Where we work

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add geographic service areas to create a map on your profile.

Login and update

Awards

Excellence Award - Supportive Housing for Orchard Commons in Allendale 2010

Governor's Conference on Housing

Innovation in Supportive Housing Award for Airmount Woods in Ramsey 2013

NJ Supportive Housing Association

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Bergen County’s United Way helps people 24 hours a day whenever and wherever help is needed by providing concrete solutions to critical community problems – with tangible results directly impacting individuals and families throughout every municipality in the county.

Our strategies for making help happen include:
• 2-1-1, the United Way’s 24 hour statewide service answering every call or click for help – 24 hours a day. It is a system that is free and easy to use – think 9-1-1 emergencies, 2-1-1 everything else.

• The Compassion Fund, direct financial assistance to help when no one else can to insure that the most basic needs are there for people in crisis.

• Housing Works, helping neighbors build communities with the creation of new and affordable housing for working poor families and individuals with special needs.

Our strengths are the quality of our programs, the professionalism of our staff, the dedication of the members of our Board of Directors and our capacity to build strategic partnerships to advance our mission.

2-1-1 has successfully completed the first phase of national accreditation. Certification by the Alliance of Information and Referral Systems (AIRS) is expected in March 2015.

BCUW/Madeline Housing Partners is designated as a Certified Housing Development Corporation (CHDO) by the New Jersey State Department of Community Affairs and recognized as a developer of choice by the New Jersey State Department of Developmental Disabilities.

Our free, confidential, and multi-lingual 2-1-1 service handles 200,000 calls for help each year. Our Compassion Fund provides temporary financial assistance to hundreds more, when no other source of help is available. Once the immediate crisis is stabilized, we connect families to services to help them rebuild. Our Back to Work program has put 220 long-term unemployed back into the job market.

Perhaps less familiar to most, is that BCUW, in partnership with the Madeline Corporation has been building award winning “Special Homes for Very Special People” to meet the need for independent living opportunities for individuals with developmental disabilities; a desperately needed alternative to costly out-of-state residential placements and unnecessary institutionalization.

Creative Housing Solutions for People with Special Needs
“Our son has lived in the Crescent Commons community in Allendale for nearly two years and they have been the most independent two years of his life thus far,” Liz Mulholland mother of JJ - age 27 (Paramus)

Today, in New Jersey, an estimated 50,000 adults are developmentally disabled. Nearly 8,000 of them are on a waiting list for supportive housing. Many live at home, often cared for by aging parents increasingly concerned about who will care for their adult children when they no longer can. Still others, live in institutional settings but could live independently and productively in community-based affordable housing were it available. Demand is growing exponentially as the first generation of children diagnosed with autism reach adulthood. Real but very scary, is that New Jersey has the highest rate of autism in the country.

To date, the BCUW/Madeline Partnership has completed 15 projects and has the opportunity, over the next several years, to build an additional 26 community-based affordable housing developments that will provide independent living opportunities for 291 adults with special needs – including Down syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, Autism, Multiple Sclerosis and other intellectual disabilities. The tenants who reside in the housing we have built are living proof that with carefully tailored and individualized supports and services all people can grow and develop in housing they control, no matter how significant their disabilities.

BCUW has raised or secured funding totaling $27 million from a combination of sources including local, state and federal grants, foundations, and private philanthropy to underwrite the cost of the projects already built or under construction. Our collaborative strategy works, and we seek to maximize our growth pace through securing private support of $5.2 million over the next 5 years.

Financials

Bergen County's United Way
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Bergen County's United Way

Board of directors
as of 06/06/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Peter (Pete) Ingrasci

IBM Corporation

James Aramanda

The Clearing House

Gary M Albrecht

Cole, Schotz, Meisel, Forman & Leonard, PA

Catherine Callagee

UPS Information Services

Elinor (Ellie) Ferdon

Community Volunteer

James Healey

Community Volunteer

Joseph (Joe) M Healy

Kolmar

Richard S Hong

First Presbyterian Church of Englewood

Robert (Bob) J Iacullo

United Water Inc.

Ralph A LaRossa

PSEG

Ann M Limberg

Bank of America Private Wealth Management

Irwin M Pollack

Community Volunteer

Alan M Posencheg

Community Volunteer

Valerie A Reardon

Emblem Health

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes