Recreation, Sports, Leisure, Athletics

PRINCETON-BLAIRSTOWN CENTER INC

A Place to Grow

Princeton, NJ

Mission

Princeton-Blairstown Center empowers young people, primarily from under-resourced communities, to strengthen their social-emotional skills through experiential, environmental, and adventure-based programming. Social Emotional Learning (SEL) includes five core competencies: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making.  Acquiring these skills will enable Princeton-Blairstown Center participants to change their communities and the world.

Ruling Year

1944

President & CEO

Pam Gregory

Main Address

13 Roszel Road, Suite C204A

Princeton, NJ 08540 USA

Keywords

social emotional learning, leadership development, academic enrichment

EIN

22-6075831

 Number

2299485456

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Recreational and Sporting Camps (Day, Overnight, etc.) (N20)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

PBC focuses on teaching critical 21st Century social-emotional and leadership skills like communication, cooperation, teamwork, problem-solving and healthy risk-taking. The staffing agency, Adecco compiled a survey that found that, “44% of respondents cited soft skills, such as communication, critical thinking, creativity, and collaboration, as the area with the biggest gap." According to the P21, “the 3Rs are no longer adequate and collaboration, as the area with the biggest gap." SEL skills are critical to being a good student, citizen, and worker, and help young people avoid risky behaviors like drug use, violence, bullying, and dropping out of school. PBC's ropes and challenge courses focus on crucial P21 skills and students have multiple opportunities to apply and practice them each day. Additionally, daily project-based learning groups provide opportunities for students to reflect, problem solve, cooperate, think creatively, and collaborate in small groups.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Blairstown Campus Programs

Summer Bridge Program

Where we workNew!

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of children who have the ability to understand and comprehend communication

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

At-risk youth

Related program

Summer Bridge Program

Number of children who have access to education

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

At-risk youth

Related program

Summer Bridge Program

Number of students showing interest in topics related to STEM

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

At-risk youth

Related program

Summer Bridge Program

Number of youth who demonstrate leadership skills (e.g., organizing others, taking initiative, team-building)

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

At-risk youth

Related program

Summer Bridge Program

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

The Princeton-Blairstown Center works in partnership with school and community-based organizations to help young people increase their social-emotional skills (i.e. assertiveness, empathy, social responsibility, and self-regard). These are an important part of an individual's overall emotional intelligence (E.I.). Daniel Goleman, in his 1998 book “Working with Emotional Intelligence," reports that job performance, as measured by superiors, peers and subordinates, is predicted three times as well by an individual's E.Q., a measure of EI, than by I.Q. Experts from close to 500 corporations, government agencies and nonprofits throughout the world have replicated this finding. Goleman also reports that leadership skills are directly related to Emotional Intelligence. John Gottman, in his 1997 book, “Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child," reports that children with high E.Q. are more likely to succeed academically than those with low E.Q. Further, he reports that aspects of a child's E.Q. predict the likelihood of later delinquency, violence, and drug and alcohol abuse. These findings demonstrate that E.I. is an important indicator of many aspects of future success. By building the skills and qualities of E.I., PBC prepares students for accomplishment and readies them to make positive personal choices.

PBC's Blairstown Campus programs help young people:
1. Form positive and supportive relationships with peers and adults:
PBC's curriculum is sequential and intentional. Small groups of students are engaged in initiatives, trust-building activities, challenge course activities, and then they progress to work on the low and high ropes courses. Through this carefully facilitated programming, groups set norms, learn to trust each other, develop effective and powerful ways of solving problems, overcome challenges, and celebrate individual and group successes. Strong bonds and friendships form and are transported back to school. Faculty members reference these experiences when students return to the classroom, helping to transfer the learning back home. The documented benefits of challenge course programming include gains in team building, trust, and cohesiveness (Glass & Benshoff, 2002; Priest, 1998).

2. Foster positive, productive social skills:
PBC's experiential education programs are designed to build SEL skills. Students will live and work in small groups. They must work together to successfully complete challenge course activities and restoration (stewardship and clean up of the site). Communal living and working together in a rustic setting strengthens empathy, cooperation, and conflict resolution skills. Challenge course work has been proven to increase self-esteem, group cohesion, leadership skills, self-efficacy, work efficacy, and leadership efficacy (Hart & Silka, 1994; Hatch & McCarthy, 2005; Paxton & McAvoy, 2000; Propst & Koesler, 1998).

3. Develop group norms that support school climate and culture:
PBC helps young people and their leaders develop and reinforce group norms around climate and culture. According to the National Council on School Climate, “school climate refers to the quality and character of school life and is based on patterns of students', parents' and school personnel's experience of school life that reflects norms, goals, values, interpersonal relationships, teaching and learning practices and organizational structures." A positive school climate fosters positive youth development and learning. A positive climate consists of school norms, values and expectations that support people feeling socially, emotionally, and physically safe; students, faculty, and staff who are engaged and respected; students, parents, and educators working together to develop, live, and contribute to a shared school vision; educators who model and nurture attitudes that emphasize the benefits and satisfaction gained from learning; and students, faculty, and staff who take pride in the school and the care of the physical environment. Peer-reviewed educational research has consistently demonstrated that a positive school climate is associated with academic achievement, effective risk prevention efforts and positive youth development.

PBC has a beautifully maintained 264-acre campus in Northwest New Jersey complete with 11 rustic log cabins, challenge courses, ropes courses, climbing towers, Bass Lake, Blair Creek, hiking trails, classrooms and a modern dining room and group meeting space. PBC's staff is carefully trained in experiential education methodology so that they can facilitate student learning. PBC has partnerships with more than 100 schools and community based organizations.

PBC measures progress in its Blairstown Campus programs through the use of student surveys. Students take a pre- and post-assessment that measures attitudinal changes. PBC uses instruments that were developed in conjunction with the American Camp Association as part of a National Research Study conducted by Phillibur Research Associates to measure the impact of an intentional summer experience on a specific set of constructs.

PBC's Blairstown Campus Programs have demonstrated strong results. Results from our 2015 Summer Bridge Pilot Program demonstrated that:
• 60-70% of the students felt their SEL skills increased a little, somewhat, or significantly; also, 60-70% felt their appreciation of/comfort in the natural world increased a little, somewhat, or significantly;
• 33% rated the experience a “10" for “the best time ever;" nearly 80% rated it an “8" or higher.
• 45% believed that Summer Bridge helped them to be more effective in helping a group be successful.
• 48% felt more tolerant toward others with opinions different from their own.
• More than half felt better able to cooperate with others.
• One-third were more likely to look for problems to solve; 42% felt more inclined to stop and think before making decisions and believed they'd make good choices.
• More than half felt more comfortable being outdoors.

External Reviews

Awards & Accreditations

American Camping Association (ACA) - Accreditation

Affiliations & Memberships

American Camp Association - Member

Chamber of Commerce

Financials

PRINCETON-BLAIRSTOWN CENTER INC

Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

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  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2015
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2015
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to see what's included.

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

Race & Ethnicity

Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Diversity Strategies

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We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
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We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
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We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
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We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
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We have a diversity committee in place
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We have a diversity manager in place
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We have a diversity plan
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We use other methods to support diversity