PLATINUM2023

AMERICAN BOARD OF OPHTHALMOLOGY

Advancing Excellence in Eye Care

Doylestown, PA   |  www.abop.org

Mission

The American Board of Ophthalmology (ABO) is an independent, not-for-profit organization and the nation's oldest medical specialty certifying board, founded in 1916. Our mission is to serve the public by certifying ophthalmologists through the verification of competencies.

Ruling year info

1946

Chief Executive Officer

Dr. George B. Bartley

Main address

PO Box 1887

Doylestown, PA 18901 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-1693176

NTEE code info

Professional Societies, Associations (G03)

Consumer Protection and Safety (W90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In the early 20th century, the quality of medical education varied widely and there were few recognized standards on which the public could rely to judge the competence of someone claiming to be a physician. The ABO was formed, in 1916, to offer a credential that a physician could electively pursue to assure the public that he or she had successfully completed a legitimate educational program and had demonstrated the knowledge, skills, and judgment necessary to practice the specialty of ophthalmology. The ABO was the first medical certification board in the United States and its model was soon adopted by other specialties. For more than a century, the ABO’s fundamental mission has remained constant: to serve the public. Broadly defined, the public includes patients as well as their families and loved ones, other members of the medical profession, and health care organizations and payers, many of whom regard ABO certification as an important credential.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Board Certification

Certification is granted to ophthalmologists who meet a series of accredited medical training requirements in ophthalmology, sign a practice pledge indicating their intent to practice with compassion, integrity, and respect for human dignity, and complete an intensive evaluation process which includes two examinations: a Written Qualifying Examination (WQE) and an Oral Examination.
Physicians who meet all of the requirements for initial certification become diplomates of the Board and earn a certificate valid for a period of 10 years.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The American Board of Ophthalmology's Continuing Certification program focuses on six core competencies a physician needs in order to deliver high quality patient care. These competencies were co-developed by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Measuring and strengthening each of these competencies is the goal of Continuing Certification.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percentage of diplomates who recertify

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Continuing Certification

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Overall, the percentage of time-limited certificate holders, who, within their 10-year cycle, complete Continuing Certification and successfully renew their ABO certification.

Use of public verification tool (number of times search tool is accessed annually)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Continuing Certification

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of times the search tool is used to verify a physician's Board Certification status

Percentage of ophthalmology residents who pursue board certification

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Board Certification

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Overall, the percentage of ophthalmology residents, who, within their 7-year eligibility, pursue ABO certification.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Accomplishing the American Board of Ophthalmology's mission and honoring its principles requires the successful execution of two processes: initial certification that typically occurs early in an ophthalmologist's career, after the completion of formal educational programs, followed by periodic demonstrations of competence and professionalism throughout the ophthalmologist's years in clinical practice. The latter has been termed “Maintenance of Certification” or “Continuing Certification.”

Since 1916, the ABO has conducted over 244 written and oral examinations for initial certification, certifying more than 33,000 ophthalmologists. As regards periodic reconfirmation of competence and professionalism, the ABO is a member board of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) and follows its continuing certification standards. These require that diplomates possess an unrestricted medical license, complete continuing medical education (CME) activities, demonstrate clinical practice knowledge, and participate in activities to improve the quality of medical care.

The American Board of Ophthalmology's strategic goals include maintaining financial viability while keeping fees as low as possible and ensuring that the organization fulfills its societal responsibility of professional self-regulation. The ABO's strategic priorities are based on seven guiding principles:

1. Certification promotes and recognizes aspirational goals, not minimum standards.
2. Certification is a lifelong process that promotes excellence through continuous improvement.
3. Certification should be voluntary, as our founders intended.
4. Certification should be challenging and meaningful, yet not burdensome to busy practitioners.
5. ABO diplomates are professionals and colleagues, and we honor them accordingly.
6. The ABO stewards its finances with integrity and transparency.
7. The ABO is an independent certifying board of practicing ophthalmologists who collaborate whenever possible with professional societies, organizations, and other stakeholders who strive to advance excellence.

The American Board of Ophthalmology's greatest asset is the dedicated commitment of approximately 550 volunteer ophthalmologists, who create examination material and administer the oral examination without compensation. The ABO collaborates closely with the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the largest membership society in ophthalmology, and approximately a dozen subspecialty organizations.

The ABO is governed by a volunteer board composed of practicing ophthalmologists and two public directors. The composition of the board ideally represents its constituency as regards gender, ethnicity, practice setting, geography, and subspecialty focus. Because all certificates issued by the ABO since 1992 have been time-limited (that is, with a ten-year expiration date), all new appointees to the board hold time-limited certificates or, if certified prior to 1992, voluntarily participate in continuing certification. The board’s day-to-day operations are managed by a full-time professional staff.

Administered the Oral Examination online for the third consecutive year while exploring emerging methods for assessing the competencies that ophthalmologists must possess to deliver high-quality care.
Advocated for the design and development of meaningful ABMS standards for Continuing Certification programs that protect the public and promote professionalism and proficiency in practice without imposing undue burden on physicians.
Set several goals aimed at promoting diversity, equity, and inclusion for all persons associated with the ABO and the ABO’s programs and policies, including redesigning the processes and guidelines for volunteering to increase diversity and representation in Board activities and requiring bias-mitigation training for volunteers.
Engaged the community of ophthalmology and other health care stakeholders in continuously improving our processes and programs. In particular, the ABO is collaborating with the American Academy of Ophthalmology to identify opportunities to improve patient safety and the overall quality of ophthalmic practice.
Implemented strategies to enhance the board certification experience from residency graduation through recertification.
Measured progress towards organizational goals and objectives using a balanced scorecard, which is available to the public on the ABO’s web site.
Established the ABO Foundation, a 501(c)(3) entity, to promote research about certification.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

AMERICAN BOARD OF OPHTHALMOLOGY
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

AMERICAN BOARD OF OPHTHALMOLOGY

Board of directors
as of 06/29/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Dr. Andreas K. Lauer

Oregon Health & Science University - Casey Eye Institute

Term: 2023 - 2023


Board co-chair

Dr. Steven J. Gedde

University of Miami Health System - Bascom Palmer Eye Institute

Term: 2023 - 2023

K. David Epley, MD

Children's Eye Care

Steven J. Gedde, MD

University of Miami School of Medicine

Don O. Kikkawa, MD, MBA

UC San Diego Health

Andreas K. Lauer, MD

Oregon Health and Sciences University

Sarah M. Nehls, MD

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

Ann A. Warn, MD, MBA

University of Oklahoma College of Medicine

Chris V. Albanis, MD

Arbor Center for Eye Care

Bennie H. Jeng, MD, MS

University of Maryland School of Medicine

Lorrayne Ward, MBA, MPP

Public Director - Dell Medical School

Martha M. Wright, MD

University of Minnesota

Keith A. Warren, MD

Warren Retina Associates

Esther M. Bowie, MD

Penn State Health Eye Center

Hans E. Grossniklaus, MD

Emory Eye Center

Tamara R. Fountain, MD

Ophthalmology Partners

Anne M. Menke, PhD

Public Director

Julie M. Falardeau, MD

Oregon Health and Sciences University

Robert E. Wiggins, MD

Asheville Eye Associates

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/26/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/19/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.